Mezzo-soprano Quinn Patrick Ankrum joins CCM as Assistant Professor of Voice in August of 2017.

Acclaimed Mezzo-Soprano Quinn Patrick Ankrum Joins CCM Voice Faculty

Mezzo-soprano Quinn Patrick Ankrum joins CCM as Assistant Professor of Voice in August of 2017.

CCM Interim Dean bruce d. mcclung has announced the addition of acclaimed mezzo-soprano Quinn Patrick Ankrum, DMA, to the college’s roster of distinguished voice faculty members. Ankrum’s appointment as Assistant Professor of Voice becomes effective on August 15, 2017.

Celebrated for her strong lyric voice, sizzling coloratura facility and engagingly sincere personality, Ankrum has performed a wide variety of repertoire spanning the centuries from Claudio Monteverdi to John Harbison. She has sung with opera companies and orchestras throughout the United States, as well as with the National Orchestra of Mexico in Mexico City.

In the 2014-15 and 2015-16 seasons she demonstrated her versatility as she collaborated on the operatic, recital and concert stages with musicians in Missouri, Texas, New York, Florida and Kansas, along with international engagements in Toulouse, Paris, Mondavio (Italy) and Oban (Scotland). She will return to the U.K. this May where she will appear in a recital featuring the music of American composers at East of England Organ Day at the Royal Hospital School, Holbrook, as well as in a concert featuring the music of Rameau with the East Anglian Academy.

Ankrum is an advocate of contemporary composers. She recently premiered Romanian composer Vlad Burlea’s chamber piece “Oglinda” (Texas and Kansas 2016) and created the role of the Mother in the world premiere of J. Todd Frazier’s opera Breath of Life (Lubbock, Texas, 2015).  In addition, she co-premiered John Harbison’s chamber work Crossroads with colleagues at Texas Tech University (2013). She is the co-creator of Living Song Project with pianist and University of Oklahoma faculty member Elizabeth Avery, DMA. This unique database project promotes the art song and vocal chamber music of living American composers.

In addition to being an active performer and teacher, Ankrum takes an interest in musicians’ health and wellness. She is an Andover Educator trainee, and will be licensed to teach the course What Every Musician Needs to Know About the Body when she finishes her training.

Ankrum received degrees from Trinity University in San Antonio (BM, MAT), the University of Colorado at Boulder (MM) and the University of Rochester, Eastman School of Music (DMA), where she studied with Robert McIver. She was a Young Artist in the Glimmerglass Opera Young American Artists Program and the Baltimore Opera Studio, and participated in the National Association of Teachers of Singing Intern Program.

She has been a finalist and winner in numerous regional and national competitions, including the Metropolitan Opera National Council auditions (Rocky Mountain Region) and the National Association of Teachers of Singing Artist Awards competition (2nd place winner, 2006). She has served on the faculties of the State University of New York at Fredonia, Nazareth College (Rochester, New York) and Texas Tech University (Lubbock).

Please join us in welcoming Ankrum to the CCM family this fall!

Learn more about CCM’s illustrious faculty by visiting ccm.uc.edu/about/villagenews/faculty.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare
Old 'Thinking About Music' lecture logo.

CCM’s ‘Thinking About Music’ Lecture Series Resumes on Feb. 6

Each semester, CCM welcomes distinguished experts for a series of free Friday afternoon musical discussions. This spring, the Thinking About Music lecture series will present five free public talks, beginning with a presentation by Tufts University Professor Joseph Auner on Friday, Feb. 6.

Sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, these music theory and history discussions feature diverse topics presented by distinguished experts from all over the United States and are designed to engage participants’ imaginations and to consider music in new ways.

This semester’s guest lecturers also include University of Minnesota Professor Michael Cherlin (Feb. 20), Cornell University Professor Annette Richards (March 6), National Jazz Museum Artistic Director Loren Schoenberg (March 13) and Eastman School of Music Professor Ellen Koskoff (April 17). See the listings below for more information on this semester’s presentation topics.

Since its inception in 1997, the Thinking About Music Series has presented over 120 lectures and one symposium by guests from a number of different colleges, universities, schools of music, foundations, institutes, museums and publications.

The subjects of the lectures have covered historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, along with the ancillary fields of organology, dance, music business and law, cognitive psychology, and the philosophy, theology and sociology of music.

Event Information
Unless otherwise indicated, all Thinking About Music lectures take place on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. in the Baur Room of CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts, which is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

These events are free and open to the public. All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu for the most current event information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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2015 SPRING JOSEPH AND FRANCES JONES POETKER THINKING ABOUT MUSIC LECTURE SERIES

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Guest speaker Joseph Auner.

2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 6
THE STOPPED CLOCK: SOME MOMENTS IN TONALITY AND TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1950
Joseph Auner, Tufts University

This talk will focus on the second half of the 20th century and two technologies that have contributed to different ways of working with tonality and tonal materials: namely, voltage controlled modular synthesizers and the tape loop. With reference to a wide range of music, Professor Joseph Auner will argue that the synthesizer and the tape loop, and related technologies like a tape-delay system, facilitated and required a kind of close listening to and manipulation of sound that could open up new perspectives on any acoustic phenomenon, including triads and tonal materials.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Guest speaker Michael Cherlin.

Guest speaker Michael Cherlin.

2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20
LUIGI NONO’S FRAGMENTE-STILLEAN DIOTIMA AND THE INEFFABLE
Michael Cherlin, University of Minnesota

The Romantic fragment, in poetry and music, points toward something that is ineffable – the sounds listeners hear point toward those that cannot be realized.  Whether it is beyond or still within Romanticism, it is this aesthetic that Michael Cherlin associates with Schoenberg and Webern, most particularly. Nono’s string quartet, a meditation on Diotima, continues that tradition. The lecture will explore the implications of this composition for a poetics of musical interpretation (whose falsifying “scientific” name is analysis).
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Guest speaker Annette Richards.

Guest speaker Annette Richards.

2:30 p.m. Friday, March 6
This talk has been postponed due to weather-related flight delays.
SENSIBILITY TRIUMPHANT: C. P. E. BACH AND THE ART OF FEELING
Dr. Annette Richards, Cornell University
In Goethe’s Triumph der Empfindsamkeit (1777), sensibility, feeling and sympathy are brutally exposed as trivial obsessions with postures and props. Excess, bad taste and poor behaviour are the focus of Goethe’s hilarious critique of the craze unleashed by his own Sorrows of Young Werther. Embodied in this strange and funny text is satire aimed not only at the cult of Empfindsamkeit and at the works of the artist himself, but also at the conspicuous blurring of public and private spheres, the untoward exposure of personal proclivities and private feeling. Given the ubiquitous text-book designation of C. P. E. Bach as the architect of the ‘Empfindsamer Stil’ in music, Dr. Annette Richards takes another look at what ‘Empfindsamkeit’ might mean, especially for Bach’s late keyboard works. Revisiting the broader cultural contexts within which Bach lived and worked, she will map out the contemporary landscape of feeling constructed by critical and literary texts, as well as musical and visual artworks (including portraits in Bach’s collection). She hopes to suggest that some of Bach’s late music, especially the rondos and fantasias, complicate humour with satire and pathos with parody, in a way that presents a complex and disconcerting picture of what it might mean to sympathise, and to feel, musically. In the process, Bach’s own claims about the competing aesthetics of public and private music will be reconsidered.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Guest speaker Loren Schoenberg.

Guest speaker Loren Schoenberg.

2:30 p.m. Friday, March 13
LESTER YOUNG: NEW DISCOVERIES
Loren Schoenberg, Artistic Director, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem

As an American jazz tenor saxophonist and a member of Count Basie’s orchestra, Lester Young was one of the young genre’s most influential forces. In the last few years, a significant amount of previously unheard recordings have shed new light on his innovations. As Loren Schoenberg will attest, every surviving sound recorded by Young is vital, since there are no documents that capture the qualities that his peers remember most vividly.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Guest speaker Ellen Koskoff.

Guest speaker Ellen Koskoff.

2:30 p.m. Friday, April 17
IS ETHNOMUSICOLOGY INHERENTLY FEMINIST?
Dr. Ellen Koskoff, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester
Dr. Ellen Koskoff will present excerpts from her recent book, A Feminist Ethnomusicology. In the process, she will raise several important questions. What, if anything, is feminist about ethnomusicology? What do fieldwork, ethnography and music contribute to the process of dismantling hierarchies of power based on gender? Furthermore, what does feminism contribute to a deeper understanding of social and musical difference? These questions will set the stage for a lively discussion.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Community Partner: ArtsWave

CCM’s Thinking About Music Series is sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, Ritter & Randolph, LLC, Corporate Counsel; along with support from Dean Landgren’s Office, the Graduate Student Association, and the Division of Composition, Musicology and Theory at CCM.

CCM News

In Memoriam: Former CCM Dean Douglas Lowry

University of Rochester Eastman School of Music Dean Emeritus Douglas Lowry in the Wolk atrium of Eastman Theatre on October 19, 2010. Photography by  J. Adam Fenster (University of Rochester).

University of Rochester Eastman School of Music Dean Emeritus Douglas Lowry in the Wolk atrium of Eastman Theatre on October 19, 2010. Photography by J. Adam Fenster (University of Rochester).

It is with heavy hearts that we report the passing of Douglas Lowry, who served as Dean of the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music from 2000 through 2007. In August of that year, Lowry became the sixth head of the Eastman School of Music. He stepped down from that role last month due to health reasons.

“It is with great sadness that I let you know that Doug Lowry has passed,” CCM Dean Peter Landgren said in a message to the CCM family this morning. “Those of you who worked with Doug know him very directly and honestly. Since I did not have the pleasure of working with Doug, my window into him is more limited than yours, yet I saw him as a strong leader, a compassionate and creative individual and someone who had a good sense of humor combined with a good sense of self. My thoughts and prayers are not only with his family but with those of you who called him a friend and colleague.”

Click here to view the official statement from the University of Rochester.

The Cincinnati Enquirer remembers Douglas Lowry here.

A memorial service is planned for 3 p.m. on Nov. 3 in Kodak Hall at the Eastman School. Gifts in his memory may be directed to the Douglas Lowry Fund for Musical Excellence, University of Rochester Office of Gift and Donor Records, 300 E. River Road, P.O. Box 270032, Rochester, N.Y., 14627.

CCM News

CCM Welcomes Kurt Weill Foundation President For A Series of Talks On Nov. 15 and 16

Guest speaker Kim Kowalke.

Guest speaker Kim Kowalke.

CCM is delighted to welcome Richard L. Turner Professor of the Humanities at the University of Rochester and President of the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music Kim Kowalke for a series of talks this week in conjunction with the Mainstage production of Street Scene.

Kowalke will speak to students enrolled in CCM’s “Kurt Weill’s Music Theatre” course on the morning of Thursday, Nov. 15 and then present a free talk before the opening performance of Street Scene. This talk is open to the public and will last from 7:15 – 7:45 p.m. in the Baur Room of UC’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts.

Kowalke will also present a Thinking About Music lecture on “What Makes Weill Weill” at 2:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 16. This talk will be held in the Baur Room and is also free and open to the general public.

A full schedule of related public events is listed below. Click here for more information on CCM’s 2012-13 Kurt Weill Festival.

CCM News

CCM Announces Updated Event Information for November and December 2012

Today, we are delighted to provide you with CCM’s updated schedule of major events for November and December 2012. All updated listings are highlighted in red.

All events listed below take place in CCM Village on the campus of the University of Cincinnati unless otherwise indicated. Admission is free to many CCM performances, although some events do require purchased tickets or reservations. Please see individual event information for details and ordering information.

All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu or contact the CCM Box Office at 513-556-4183 for the most current event information.

CCM News

Cincinnati Enquirer Previews CCM’s Kurt Weill Festival

This weekend, the Cincinnati Enquirer‘s Jackie Demaline provided an early look at CCM’s yearlong Kurt Weill Festival. You can read her preview here.

The festival resumes next month with a Mainstage production of Kurt Weill, Langston Hughes and Elmer Rice’s great American opera Street Scene, conducted by Mark Gibson with stage direction by Steven Goldstein. Street Scene runs Nov. 15 – 18 in UC’s Patricia Corbett Theater.

Visit CCM’s official Facebook page for a behind-the-scenes look at the production!

CCM News

CCM’s Resident Kurt Weill Expert Featured in New York Times

Railroads on Parade Program Cover

CCM’s resident Kurt Weill scholar, Associate Professor of Musicology bruce mcclung, was quoted in an Oct. 21 New York Times article on the discovery of a previously unknown recording of Weill’s “Railroads on Parade” composition from the 1939 World Fair.

Record collector Guy Walker discovered the recordings in 2007 and plans to release the music on CD this month, with liner notes by mcclung. Read the full New York Times article here.

CCM’s yearlong Kurt Weill Festival kicked-off earlier this month. You can learn more about that unprecedented series of events here.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare

CCM Celebrates Iconic Composer Kurt Weill With Yearlong Festival

Theatre composer Kurt Weill in New City, ca. 1945 (photo: Engel). Image courtesy of the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music.

Theatre composer Kurt Weill in New City, ca. 1945 (photo: Engel). Image courtesy of the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music.

Beginning this month, CCM will celebrate the iconic work and enduring legacy of composer Kurt Weill with an unprecedented series of events. Opening on Friday, Oct. 19, and running through Tuesday, March 12, CCM’s Kurt Weill Festival will incorporate the renowned theatre composer into a broad range of both public performances and classroom exercises.

Perhaps best known for The Threepenny Opera and its opening ballad, “Mack the Knife,” Weill’s work has been championed by performers as diverse as Louis Armstrong, Bobby Darin, Nina Simone, The Doors, Judy Collins, Teresa Stratas, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Todd Rundgren, Tom Waits, Lou Reed and Sting.

CCM’s yearlong Kurt Weill Festival will include Mainstage opera and musical theatre productions, cabaret performances, collaborative concerts, master classes and more. Funded in part by the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, CCM has never before hosted a festival of this magnitude.

CCM News