E-Media Professor’s Technology Article Wins International Award for Excellence

Assistant Professor of E-Media Peter DePietro.

Assistant Professor of E-Media Peter DePietro.

Technology is changing the social fabric of cities in Central Europe and pushing them into a new cultural renaissance, according to University of Cincinnati Electronic Media Professor Peter DePietro. His research into this renaissance was praised by the Technology, Knowledge & Society Research Network, which recently awarded DePietro an International Award for Excellence for Volume 12 of The Technology Collection for his article “Tech in Europe: Cultural Reboot.”

The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society offers the annual award for newly published research or thinking that has been recognized to be outstanding by members of the Technology, Knowledge & Society Research Network. DePietro’s winning article was selected from the ten highest-ranked articles that emerged from the peer preview process. Published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Technologies in Society, DePietro’s research compares Europe’s “cultural reboot” of today to the existential movements of the past.

“German existentialist Friedrich Nietzsche advocated for cultural rebirth in Europe,” DePietro wrote. “Europe is experiencing such a rebirth with digital media: creating artistic and social cultures that are wildly interesting and progressive and have technology integrated in them.”

His article argues that Vienna is a “hotbed” of innovative applications of digital media in art. Vienna is creating a new kind of “digital modernism” by creating things that are “different, weird and strange.” DePietro also states that Berlin is poised to become a leader in digital media in Europe by integrating it into art, commerce, education and lifestyle.

“Digital media is bringing together high society and bohemianism, in an effort to create a new economy,” DePietro wrote.

The professor has taught within the E-Media Division at UC’s College-Conservatory of Music since January 2009 and is the founding Director of Digital Innovation Lab: A New Media and Technology Incubator. He’s taught courses at UC that focus on social media, new media, interactive media, electronic game design and development, and digital storytelling and innovation.

“In my career as a scholar, tech artist, digital media leader and teacher, I have known innovation to be the all-important foundation of significant new work,” he said. “Innovation is authentic. Innovators are makers.”

DePietro is especially attuned to the effects of innovative digital media and interactive technologies on culture. He previously served as the founding Director of Digital and New Media for the Clinton Foundation in New York and the Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock. DePietro analyzed new technologies and implemented those that best communicated former President Bill Clinton’s post-Washington message, and led a team in the design and development of new media platforms to support Clinton’s initiatives, among other responsibilities. His team’s work won an international award.

DePietro is also the author of the book Transforming Education with New Media, published by Peter Lang International Publishers. He is Associate Editor of the International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society, and his research on new media and emerging technologies has been published internationally in academic journals, as well as the mainstream press.

For more information on DePietro’s research, visit www.depietro.com.

About the Technology Collection:
The Technology Collection has an acceptance rate of 58 percent and a circulation of over 64,000. This collection explores innovative theories and practices relating technology to society. The collection is cross-disciplinary in its scope, offering a meeting point for technologists with a concern for the social and social scientists with a concern for the technological. The focus is primarily, but not exclusively, on information and communications technologies. Established in 2005 and currently publishing its 13th volume, The Technology Collection is indexed by EBSCO, the Australian Research Council, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Cabell’s, Genamics Journal Seek and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. This collection offers both personal and institutional subscriptions and is published electronically and in print. For more information, please visit www.cgnetworks.org/journals/slr.

About Common Ground Research Networks:

The Technology Collection contains four among the 70 scholarly journals published by Common Ground Research Networks. Common Ground, which was founded in 1984, seeks to take the pivotal ideas and challenges at play within established disciplines and create spaces for interaction that cut horizontally across legacy knowledge structures. As a result, in addition to providing a space for publication within its catalog of journals and their associated book imprints, Common Ground encourages researchers and practitioners to meet at the annual academic conferences that it organizes around the world and then connect and share their work virtually using Scholar, Common Ground’s innovative social knowledge software. For more information, please visit www.cgnetworks.org.

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Dean Mogle holds the white and black swan design sketches for CCM's production of Swan Lake.

From Sketch to Stage: The Making of CCM’s ‘Swan Lake’ Costumes

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There is a shortage of tutu makers in the world, said CCM Professor and Head of the Costume Design and Technology Program Dean Mogle, who faced the daunting task of designing costumes for Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake ballet.

CCM is working to fix that shortage by training the next generation of costume designers and technicians, whose work will debut on stage in the conservatory’s first ballet production to have costumes designed and built in-house.

A timeless tale of love, magic and mystery, Swan Lake will grace the Corbett Auditorium stage from April 22-24, marking the second time in CCM’s nearly 150-year history that a full-length story ballet has been included in the Mainstage Series.

Costuming for CCM's 'Swan Lake.' Photo by Ryan Strand.

Staff and students within the Costume Design and Technology program have worked on the ‘Swan Lake’ costumes for the past 18 months.

Presented by CCM’s Department of Dance, the ballet uses three different casts and the principal roles are all double cast ­— which is challenging for the costume shop students and staff responsible for ensuring the pieces fit each dancer correctly.

“You have to understand what dancers go through—what they need,” Mogle said. “Balance becomes really important.”

Costume designers and technicians must consider the weight of the fabrics and headpieces so the dancer can retain their natural balance. There is also limited “real estate” on the costume for artistic expression or characterization, Mogle said. If a female dancer needs to be lifted, safety dictates the fabric around her waist can’t be too slick and can’t get caught on anything.

“The ballet world is a totally different beast.”

Costuming for CCM's 'Swan Lake.' Photo by Ryan Strand.

Newly designed costumes for the Hungarian Czardas in Act III of ‘Swan Lake,’ made by costume students and staff. To the far right is Prince Siegfried’s jacket, made by Jessica Barksdale.

Mogle, with a team of students and faculty within the Costume Design and Technology program, has worked on the Swan Lake costumes for the past 18 months. They’ve borrowed and modified some costumes from a previous CCM performance of Brigadoon and the Broadway production of Cyrano, The Musical. Costumes for the principal and specialty roles in the ballet are newly designed and made.

Iconic white tutus, bodices, vibrant dresses and rich fabrics have taken over their workshop. The costumes are designed in the traditional style typically associated with the classic ballet. CCM plans to reuse and rent out some of them after the performance.

Costuming for CCM's 'Swan Lake.' Photo by Ryan Strand.

Jessica Barksdale is building Mogle’s design for Prince Siegfried’s costume, which will be worn in Acts III and IV.

Mogle, who previously designed costumes for the Cincinnati Ballet’s The Nutcracker, watched five or six different productions of Swan Lake to prepare for his costume designs. The pieces are still evolving on a daily basis, he said.

“Since we are making the production to last about 30 or 40 years, we don’t ever want to get too wild and crazy with the concept because it is pretty traditional,” Mogle said. “The things that really change in a traditional ballet like this are going to be the specialty characters.”

Those include the newly designed and made pieces that will be worn at the ball in Act III, where the Queen invites potential wives from Poland, Hungary, Italy, Spain, Naples and Poland to match with her son, Prince Siegfried.

Costuming for CCM's 'Swan Lake.' Photo by Ryan Strand.

A sketch and sleeve of Von Rothbart’s Act III costume, made by Erin Winslow.

At the ball, Prince Siegfried will wear a newly designed black and gold jacket made by Jessica Barksdale, first-year costume technology graduate student. Rothbart, the evil sorcerer who cursed the prince’s love Odette, will wear an intricately detailed costume made by senior costume technology student, Erin Winslow, as part of her capstone project.

Barskdale and Winslow are also making the iconic white and black swan costumes for leading female characters Odette and Odile. Associate Professor of Costume Technology Regina Truhart is managing all costume production for the ballet.

Costuming for CCM's 'Swan Lake.' Photo by Ryan Strand.

The in-progress white and black swan costumes for characters Odette and Odile are being made by Jessica Barksdale and Erin Winslow, respectively.

After 27 years at CCM, Mogle is familiar with the 30,000 costume pieces the conservatory has in stock. Luckily, the costume department was able to pull pieces from past performances of Brigadoon and Cyrano to modify them for courtier and peasant costumes in Swan Lake.

The costume department dyed some of the costumes in bright jewel tones and added details such as sashes, sleeves, aprons and hats. Net petticoats were used to make the costumes lighter and easier to dance in.

Costuming for CCM's 'Swan Lake.' Photo by Ryan Strand.

Costumes from the CCM production of ‘Brigadoon’ are being modified for the female peasants in Act I of ‘Swan Lake.’

“Every time we do [Swan Lake], we’ll add more to it and rely less on our costume stock,” Mogle said, adding that when the ballet is performed again in 6 years they will likely build new peasant costumes.

“That’s how some companies do it anyway. They’ll use tutus from many kinds of shows. Pulling together a show like this from all of these different places is a great exercise.”

Acquiring materials is one hurdle but then, of course, the costumes must actually fit.

It helps that musical theatre bodies and dancer bodies are similar in stature, Mogle said. It would cost around $5,000 to reproduce one of the Cyrano costumes today.

Costuming for CCM's 'Swan Lake.' Photo by Ryan Strand.

Costume technicians included three clasp sizes on the ‘Swan Lake’ bodices so they can be adjusted for different dancers.

With three different casts, and double-cast principals, it was important to make the costumes interchangeable for different dancers. The technicians included three clasp sizes for the bodices to make them more adjustable and, in some cases, built extra costumes.

The process and pieces are evolving daily, with more adjustments expected after fittings and the dress rehearsals. A beautiful design can look perfect on a mannequin but flawed when put on a body that needs to breathe, dance and kick. That is why it’s important for the costuming students to learn each step in the creative process, said Mogle.

 “The whole focus of our program is teaching design and technology so designers know how to make stuff and makers know how to design stuff. So they all have the same sensibility as to how things should look and how they should be handled. If the knowledge base in those two roles isn’t strong then things fall apart.”

After the designs are sketched, the appropriate fabrics need to be found, Mogle said of the costuming process. Then there’s making the patterns and cutting them out of the cloth and stitching them together. There’s also fabric painting and dying and mask and jewelry making.

“Each one of those is a profession in itself,” Mogle said. “The more skills you have as a technician and the more kinds of plays and operas and ballets that you can design as a designer, your job market opens up. It’s a good part of training and real life experience.”

Co-directed by Dance Department Chair Jiang Qi and Associate Professor of Dance Deirdre Carberry, the Mainstage Series production features students from CCM’s BFA Ballet program. The lavishly staged spectacle features accompaniment by CCM’s lauded Concert Orchestra under the direction of Assistant Professor of Music Aik Khai Pung.

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Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake runs April. 22 – 24 in Corbett Auditorium. Tickets are $27-31 for adults, $17-20 for non-UC students and $15-18 UC students with a valid ID.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online at ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/mainstage/swan-lake.

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CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Mainstage Season Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Community Partner: ArtsWave

Production Sponsors: Rosemary & Mark Schlachter, Teri Jory & Seth Geiger and Graeter’s
____________________

Story by Rebecca Butts

CCM News CCM Slideshows Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Costume Design and Technology Celebrates the Work of Legendary Designer Jane Greenwood with Exhibit During USITT Conference Next Week

Next week, Cincinnati will welcome the United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT) to the Duke Energy Convention Center for its 55th annual Conference and Stage Expo. Running from March 18 – 21, this multidisciplinary showcase will draw performing arts industry leaders from throughout the world, as well as scores of current and former CCM students and faculty members.

Legendary costume designer Jane Greenwood will be honored with the USITT Costume Commission’s Distinguished Achievement Award during this year’s conference and CCM’s Costume Design and Technology Program will curate a costume exhibition during the event in honor of her achievements. Last year, Greenwood was awarded the Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre.

Organized by CCM Costume Design and Technology Professor and Program Head Dean Mogle, the exhibit will feature the magnificent costumes from Greenwood’s Broadway production of The Scarlet Pimpernel. CCM had the opportunity to purchase this extraordinary collection several years ago, as the national tour of The Scarlet Pimpernel came to an end.

Mogle explains, “I was particularly interested in acquiring this collection due to its exceptional attention to period design and detail, as well as the wide range of fabrics and costume crafts represented, from hats to shoes to hand-painted textiles.”

CCMJaneGreenwoodCollectionCollage

According to Mogle, this single production demonstrated the full range of Greenwood’s creative imagination, character work and mastery of her craft: from the lavish “Cupid” costumes and headpieces, to the elegant ball clothes, to the animal-inspired “Creation of Man” ensembles, to the beautifully hand-painted examples of lower class citizenry.

CCMJaneGreenwoodCollection6Not only did this collection add to CCM’s 25,000 piece costume stock inventory, it has also been used as a preeminent example of professional skill for the training of Mogle’s students in tailoring, dressmaking, millinery, crafts, and design.

Dubbed simply “Magnificent!”, this exhibit will also call attention to the expertise of the makers and crafts artisans from the studios of Eric Winterling, Parsons-Meares, John David Ridge and Lynne Mackey, among others, who were responsible for bringing Ms. Greenwood’s designs to life.

Mogle and his team are making final preparations this week and 30 costumes from Greenwood’s Broadway production of The Scarlet Pimpernel will then be transported to and installed in the Duke Energy Convention Center. Exhibition visitors will be able to appreciate up-close the beautiful fabrics, cut, construction, finish and craft details for which Greenwood and her collaborators are well known.

About Jane Greenwood
hs_janegreenwood
Jane Greenwood is the legendary costumer designer of more than 125 Broadway shows,  including last season’s Act One, along with numerous productions for regional theaters, opera and ballet companies, television and film. She was honored with the Tony Awrd for Lifetime Achievement in Theatre in 2014.

Ms. Greenwood’s professional career began with training at Liverpool Art Academy and London’s Central School of Arts and Crafts. She learned from such influential historians, designers and crafts artisans as Norah Waugh, Janet Arnold, Tanya Moiseiwitsch and Desmond Heeley. This early training is reflected in her true understanding of period silhouettes, fabrics, trims and construction techniques.

Beyond these technical considerations, Jane Greenwood is ultimately respected for her impeccably detailed character work from principles to supernumeraries. All characters, no matter what their role or whether they speak or sing a word, have a story to tell. Ms. Greenwood’s designs always tell their story.

About the USITT
The United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT) is a place to network, exchange ideas and grow. Professionals and pre-professionals in design, production and technology for the performing arts have been keeping USITT vital and strong since 1960.

USITT provides learning opportunities and networking for over 3,800 members worldwide. From the architects who design the spaces to those who create and manage productions, USITT is the place where the performing arts community gathers. Learn more by visiting www.usitt.org.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare

CCM Welcomes Video Game Composer Chance Thomas for Public Lecture and Master Class on Feb. 18

CCM’s Division of Composition, Musicology and Theory hosts award winning video game composer, educator and entrepreneur Chance Thomas for a one-time-only event next week.

Thomas will present a public lecture on “Composing Music for Games: The Art, Tech and Commerce of Video Game Scoring” from 3:30 – 4:30 p.m., which will be followed by a master class from 4:30 – 6 p.m., on Wednesday, Feb. 18, in room 3240 of the Corbett Center for the Performing Arts. These events are free and open to the general public.

This special guest lecture will offer students an extraordinary opportunity to learn vital music design principles, revolutionary adaptive scoring techniques and powerful entrepreneurial strategies from one of the game industry’s most innovative and successful composers.

How does music change seamlessly to follow the action in popular online multiplayer video games like Defense of the Ancients 2? What is the single most powerful piece of technology available to video game composers today? What should every composer take into every single business pitch? Come and discover answers to all of these questions and many more as Thomas delves into the complex and fascinating world of music scoring for games!

CCM alumni are already making names for themselves in this dynamic field. After working on the major motion picture Star Trek: Into Darkness, alumnus Michael John Mollo (MM Composition, 2005) found himself working on his very first interactive score for a video game: Strider HD. Read more about his experiences in the video game industry here.

About Chance Thomas
Chance Thomas is an American composer, educator and entrepreneur. He helps students and professionals navigate the intersection of music scoring, technology and business.

His music has underscored blockbuster commercial success and critical acclaim, including an Oscar, an Emmy and billions of dollars in video game and film sales worldwide. Just last year, more than four million people bought Thomas’ original music score for Defense of the Ancients 2 (otherwise known as DOTA 2) as part of the T14 compendium.

Thomas’ top video game credits include DOTA 2, Lord of the Rings Online, James Cameron’s Avatar, Heroes of Might and Magic, Marvel Ultimate Alliance, Dungeons and Dragons Online, Peter Jackson’s King Kong and many more.

His music can be heard on hit television shows like Pawn Stars, The Bachelorette and America’s Most Wanted. His movie scores include an Academy Award-winner, Columbia Pictures’ delightful animated short film, The ChubbChubbs!

Thomas is a director of the Game Audio Network Guild and serves on several advisory boards. His business interests range across studios, publishing and audio services, successfully supporting an active composing career spanning more than 20 years.

For complete credits, awards and music samples, please visit www.chancethomas.com.

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CCM's Cohen Family Studio Theater.

CCM Lighting Design Majors Show Off Their Skills With Help From Vincent Lighting Systems

LightingDesign0226The stars-of-tomorrow in CCM’s Lighting Design and Technology program will have the chance to shine brighter than ever this week thanks to the generosity of Vincent Lighting Systems.

Each year, students in CCM’s course on “Moving Light Programming” get an opportunity to show off their mastery of the art and science of lighting design in a dazzling class presentation entitled “BAMM!”

Students spend weeks planning for this capstone event and are then given only a few days to execute their plans, programming complex lighting on a rig of various fixtures – each with different attributes and abilities – in CCM’s versatile Cohen Family Studio Theater.

This year, long-time CCM supporter Vincent Lighting Systems has donated equipment to the event, allowing students to install and work with some of the most advanced gear available in the lighting industry.

This unique experience puts these students on the forefront of lighting education, reinforcing CCM’s reputation as the finest training program for lighting professionals in the country.

CCM’s faculty, staff and students would like to thank UC alumni Paul Vincent and Adam Hayward, along with the rest of the Vincent Lighting Team, for making this experience possible.

CCM Lighting Design and Technology presents BAMM! at 8 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 16. This is an open class presentation, however seating is limited.

Learn more about CCM’s Lighting Design and Technology program by visiting ccm.uc.edu/theatre/tdp/lighting.

Learn more about Vincent Lighting Systems by visiting http://www.vls.com.

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CCM Alumnus Travis Hagenbuch Nominated For Fourth Primetime Emmy

CCM Alumnus Travis Hagenbuch with the first two Emmys he won.

CCM Alumnus Travis Hagenbuch with the first two Emmys he won.

CCM alumnus Travis Hagenbuch (BFA, 2007) was nominated for his fourth primetime Emmy award this year (ceremonies were held on Sept. 22).

Nominated in the category of “Lighting Design,” Hagenbuch has designed lighting for such live televised events as the Olympics, President Obama’s inaugural celebration, a Super Bowl halftime show with Tom Petty, the Academy Awards, the Grammy Awards, the Tony Awards, the Academy of Country Music Awards, BET Awards, as well as TV specials for Lionel Richie, Betty White’s 90th birthday and Celine Dion.

The three Emmys has won to date are for the Vancouver Olympics’ opening ceremony in 2010 and for two Grammy ceremonies in 2011 and 2012.

You can learn more about Travis Hagenbuch courtesy of UC Magazine.

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CCM Announces New Electronic Media Division Head

Professor John Owens has been appointed head of CCM's Division of Electronic Media.

Professor John Owens has been appointed head of CCM’s Division of Electronic Media.

CCM is pleased to announce that Professor John Owens, PhD, has been appointed head of the Division of Electronic Media (E-Media). Owens’ appointment will take effect this summer, following the retirement of former E-Media division head Marjorie Fox.

Owens joined CCM E-Media’s faculty in 1999 and has taught a variety of courses concentrated in the areas of media sales and programming. He also leads students in the development and management of Bearcast, the University of Cincinnati’s official internet radio station. In 2001, he was recognized with a CCM Ernest N. Glover Outstanding Teaching Award.

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Discussing ‘The Magic Flute’ Costume Designs with CCM Professor Dean Mogle

From left to right, Tara Deieso (who sings the role of First Lady in CCM's production of 'The Magic Flute'), Assistant Costume Designer Kaitlyn Munro, Professor Dean Mogle and Draper/Dressmaker Christie Peitzmeier.

From left to right, Tara Deieso (who sings the role of First Lady in CCM’s production of ‘The Magic Flute’), Assistant Costume Designer Kaitlyn Munro, Professor Dean Mogle and Draper/Dressmaker Christie Peitzmeier.

CCM Professor of Costume Design Dean Mogle recently gave CCM Public Information Assistant and Arts Administration student Sara Kissinger a behind-the-scenes tour of the costume shop, which is in full swing in these last crucial weeks before the opening of The Magic Flute. All photography by CCM Arts Administration student Shawn Kelly.

Sara Kissinger: Dean, thank you so much for inviting me to visit the shop today. The Magic Flute is an iconic work in opera repertoire – have you designed for this show before?

Dean Mogle: I have not designed a production of Flute before. The last time CCM did Flute was the 1986-87 season, before I joined the faculty.

SK: Did you have a specific concept for your design?

DM: There were two major influences on the design. The first is the 18th century influence, which is a nod back to when Mozart wrote the opera. This is the Queen of the Night’s world. It’s midnight: there are a lot of blues and everything is deep and dark and rich. The second influence is a sort of modified Egyptian style, which is Sarastro’s world. The costumes are warm colors – gold and bronze.

Dean Mogle shares the original costume rendering for the Queen of the Night.

Dean Mogle shares the original costume rendering for the Queen of the Night.

SK: What was the process of making the costumes like?

CCM News Faculty Fanfare

CCM Theatre Design & Production Students Win State-Of-The-Art ETC Consoles

We are proud to announce that a team of CCM Theatre Design & Production (TD&P) Lighting Design and Technology students won second place in Electronic Theatre Controls‘ recent “Show Us Your ETC!” student-video challenge.

The students involved in this effort included producers Nik Robalino, David Seitz and Ethan Peterson with assistance from Natalie Estes, Alan Hanson, Alan Kleesattel and Tim Schmall. Their project involved combining their technical and graphic skills to pixel-map Fred Foster’s face.

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CCM Offers New Undergraduate Major in Commercial Music Production

CCM is now accepting applications for an innovative new bachelor of music degree in Commercial Music Production (CMP) that will be offered beginning fall semester 2012. This unique program combines core training in music theory, composition, arranging and musicianship with recording studio techniques, commercial music, songwriting, film scoring and media technologies.

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