Old 'Thinking About Music' lecture logo.

CCM’s Thinking About Music Lecture Series Resumes On Friday, Jan. 27

Each semester, CCM welcomes distinguished experts for a series of free Friday afternoon musical discussions. This spring, the Thinking About Music lecture series will present four free public talks, beginning with a presentation on Arnold Schoenberg and the 1913 Scandal Concert by Vanderbilt University Professor of Musicology Joy H. Calico on Friday, Jan. 27.

Schoenberg caricature originally published in 'Die Zeit' on April 6, 1913.

Schoenberg caricature originally published in ‘Die Zeit’ on April 6, 1913.

Sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, these music theory and history discussions feature diverse topics presented by distinguished experts from all over the United States and are designed to engage participants’ imaginations and to consider music in new ways.

This semester’s guest lecturers also include University of Kentucky Professor Donna Kwon (Feb. 10), Case Western Reserve University Professor Francesca Brittan (March 3) and Bowling Green State University Professor Per Broman (April 7). See the listings below for more information on this semester’s presentation topics.

Since its inception in 1997, the Thinking About Music Series has presented over 130 lectures and one symposium by guests from a number of different colleges, universities, schools of music, foundations, institutes, museums and publications.

The subjects of the lectures have covered historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, along with the ancillary fields of organology, dance, music business and law, cognitive psychology, and the philosophy, theology and sociology of music.
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2017 SPRING JOSEPH AND FRANCES JONES POETKER THINKING ABOUT MUSIC LECTURE SERIES

TAM guest lecturer Joy Calico.2:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27
ARNOLD SCHOENBERG AND THE 1913 SCANDAL CONCERT
Joy H. Calico, Vanderbilt University

On March 31 of 1913, Arnold Schoenberg conducted a concert in the Great Hall of Vienna’s Musikverein, which became known as the city’s most notorious scandal concert. The event was broken up by a melee, charges were filed and the subsequent court proceedings were reported in the press. This lecture analyzes the ways in which both the scandal and Schoenberg’s response to it sit at the nexus of fin-de-siècle anxieties about Central European concert life, the anti-noise movement and emerging copyright law.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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TAM guest lecturer Donna Kwon.2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10
STEPPING IN THE MADANG: SITE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE IN KOREAN DRUMMING AND DANCE
Donna Kwon, University of Kentucky

In Korean folk expressive culture, the outdoor village courtyard or madang is often conceived in opposition to the concert stage or mudae. In this presentation, Donna Kwon will discuss how the madang became central to the promotion of site-specific Korean drumming and dance. She will first discuss how this contributes to the expressive ecology of a place-based tradition in shamanist ritual forms of Korean drumming or p’ungmul. Then she will explore how the madang and site-specific performance concepts are applied by contemporary ch’angjak yeonhui groups. These groups consist of performers who are trained in Korean drumming and other traditional performing arts but who combine them into new works.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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TAM guest lecturer Francesca Brittan.2:30 p.m. Friday, March 3
ELECTRIC BATON: SOUND, SCIENCE AND THE BIRTH OF THE PODIUM CONDUCTOR
Francesca Brittan, Case Western Reserve University

Hector Berlioz, among the first of the modern conductors, was a larger-than-life figure, at once magisterial, quasi-magical and military. Among the formative moments of his conducting career was a concert given at the height of the Exposition universelle (Paris, 1855), which established him as a musical leader of formidable power. Here he relied on a new wedding of music and technology — an “electric baton” — to wield the massive forces under his command. This talk examines the nature of his device and, more broadly, the ways in which telegraphy and electricity (both artificial and nervous) emerged as central to romantic notions of conducting.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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TAM guest lecturer Per Broman.2:30 p.m. Friday, Apr. 7
BERGMAN’S MUSIC(IANS): MIRROR AND MEANING
Per Broman, Bowling Green State University

Ingmar Bergman’s love of classical music, especially that of J.S. Bach, is well known and is exhibited frequently in his films. Many films also feature musicians. In this presentation, Broman will analyze the role of these characters — who they are, what they do, how they behave and what they talk about — and argue that they are essential for understanding Bergman’s aesthetics.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Event Information
Unless otherwise indicated, all Thinking About Music lectures take place on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. in the Baur Room of CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts, which is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

These events are free and open to the public. All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu for the most current event information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
___________________

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

CCM’s Thinking About Music Series is sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, Ritter & Randolph, LLC, Corporate Counsel; along with support from Interim Dean mcclung’s Office, the Graduate Student Association and the Division of Composition, Musicology and Theory at CCM.

 

 

CCM News
Old 'Thinking About Music' lecture logo.

CCM’s Thinking About Music Lecture Series Opens Friday, Sept. 9

Each semester, CCM welcomes distinguished experts for a series of free Friday afternoon musical discussions. This fall, the Thinking About Music lecture series will present four free public talks, beginning with a presentation by Indiana University Jacobs School of Music Professor Halina Goldberg on Friday, Sept. 9, held as part of CCM’s Fall Polish Festival.

CCM's Fall 2016 Thinking About Music Lecture Series schedule.Sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, these music theory and history discussions feature diverse topics presented by distinguished experts from all over the United States and are designed to engage participants’ imaginations and to consider music in new ways.

This semester’s guest lecturers also include University of Alabama Professor Stephen Peles (Sept. 16), Yale University Professor Brian Kane (Sept. 30) and Miami University Professor Tammy Kernodle (Oct. 28). See the listings below for more information on this semester’s presentation topics.

Since its inception in 1997, the Thinking About Music Series has presented nearly 130 lectures and one symposium by guests from a number of different colleges, universities, schools of music, foundations, institutes, museums and publications.

The subjects of the lectures have covered historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, along with the ancillary fields of organology, dance, music business and law, cognitive psychology, and the philosophy, theology and sociology of music.

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2016 FALL JOSEPH AND FRANCES JONES POETKER THINKING ABOUT MUSIC LECTURE SERIES

CCM's Thinking About Music Lecture Series welcomes Halina Goldberg on Sept. 9, 2016.2:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9
THE NATIONAL COMPOSER / THE COSMOPOLITAN COMPOSER: IN SEARCH OF POLISH (?) MUSIC
Halina Goldberg, Jacobs School of Music

Dr. Halina Goldberg, acknowledged as one of the world’s foremost experts on Polish music, will present a lecture on aspects of Polish art and culture.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE

Polish Festival Sponsor: Judith Heiny and Piotr Chomczynski
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CCM's Thinking About Music Lecture Series welcomes Stephen Peles on Sept. 16, 2016.2:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16
HOW THE GIVEN IS TAKEN: BABBITT, PRINCETON AND THE PSYCHOLOGIZATION OF POSTWAR AMERICAN MUSIC ANALYSIS
Stephen Peles, University of Alabama

The public controversy engendered by Babbitt’s call for a “scientific” music theory has tended to overshadow other more enduring aspects of his meta-theoretical program. This lecture argues for the significance to Babbitt’s legacy of his insistence on the centrality of the listener (real and imagined) to analytic claims.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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CCM's Thinking About Music Lecture Series welcomes Brian Kane on Sept. 30, 2016.2:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30
HEARING DOUBLE: JAZZ ONTOLOGY
Brian Kane, Yale University
Philosophers have often considered the ontology of music, worrying over the relation between works, scores and performances — yet jazz has not received the same consideration. This lecture argues for a non-essentialist, network-based ontology of jazz standards.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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CCM's Thinking About Music Lecture Series welcomes Tammy Kernodle on Oct. 28, 2016.2:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28
I TOO SING AMERICA: BLACK WOMEN MUSICIANS, LANGSTON HUGHES AND THE ADVANCEMENT OF BLACK RADICAL EXPRESSIVE CULTURE IN COLD WAR ERA AMERICA
Tammy Kernodle, Miami University

This talk will explore how poet/activist Langston Hughes’ collaborations with Margaret Bonds, Odetta and Nina Simone provided the foundation for the type of radical expressive culture that advanced, musically, the ideals of political and social equality during the 1950s and 1960s.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Event Information

Unless otherwise indicated, all Thinking About Music lectures take place on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. in the Baur Room of CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts, which is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

These events are free and open to the public. All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu for the most current event information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

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A preeminent institution for the performing and media arts, CCM is the largest single source of performing arts presentations in the state of Ohio.

All event dates and programs are subject to change. For a complete calendar of events, please visit us online at ccm.uc.edu.

CCM News
Old 'Thinking About Music' lecture logo.

CCM’s ‘Thinking About Music’ Lecture Series Resumes on Jan. 29, 2016

Each semester, CCM welcomes distinguished experts for a series of free Friday afternoon musical discussions. This spring, the Thinking About Music lecture series will present five free public talks, beginning with a presentation by Indiana University Jacobs School of Music Professor Blair Johnston on Friday, Jan. 29.

CCM's Spring 2016 'Thinking About Music' Schedule.

CCM’s Spring 2016 ‘Thinking About Music’ Schedule.

Sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, these music theory and history discussions feature diverse topics presented by distinguished experts from all over the United States and are designed to engage participants’ imaginations and to consider music in new ways.

This semester’s guest lecturers also include University of California at Los Angeles Professor Daniel Neuman (Feb. 26), Yale University Professor Brian Kane (March 11), Cornell University Professor Annette Richards (April 1) and Tufts University Professor Emerita Janet Schmalfeldt (April 15). See the listings below for more information on this semester’s presentation topics.

Since its inception in 1997, the Thinking About Music Series has presented nearly 130 lectures and one symposium by guests from a number of different colleges, universities, schools of music, foundations, institutes, museums and publications.

The subjects of the lectures have covered historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, along with the ancillary fields of organology, dance, music business and law, cognitive psychology, and the philosophy, theology and sociology of music.

Event Information
Unless otherwise indicated, all Thinking About Music lectures take place on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. in the Baur Room of CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts, which is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

These events are free and open to the public. All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu for the most current event information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

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2016 SPRING JOSEPH AND FRANCES JONES POETKER THINKING ABOUT MUSIC LECTURE SERIES

'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Blair Johnston.2:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 29
ORCHESTRATIONAL SCENARIOS IN THE MUSIC OF SIBELIUS
Blair Johnston, Indiana University

Orchestration—and, with it, the roles that timbre plays in musical rhetoric, expressive trajectories, and the choices made by performers—deserves more attention from scholars than it has received. In an ongoing project, Blair Johnston is examining the rich ways that orchestrational choices in post-Romantic symphonic works interact with the “structures” described by more conventional music analysis, an area that features music-theoretic vocabularies that do not always allow for easy discussion of certain dimensions of sound—in broad terms, its shapes, its colors, its densities—that are especially essential in music from this era. This talk will explore this through the use of late symphonic works by Sibelius (excerpts from the Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Symphonies and Tapiola), music in which complex approaches to musical form and material are fused to a highly individual orchestrational language—indeed, music in which there may be almost no line between form, material and timbre.
Location: 
Baur Room
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'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Daniel Neuman.2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 26
MUSIC INHERITANCE AND HEREDITARY MUSICIANS: INDIA TODAY, THE WEST IN THE PAST
Daniel Neuman, University of California at Los Angeles

In this talk, Daniel Neuman considers the role of hereditary musicians in India in the recent past as well as today, as they become increasingly rare in the Hindustani classical music world. Some comparative gestures to Western classical music (and in particular J.S. Bach) highlight the important roles that genealogy, pedigree and biography play as different kinds of authentication markers and historical sources in each classical music practice.
Location: 
Baur Room
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'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Brian Kane.

Brian Kane’s March 11 lecture has been canceled. Stay tuned for information on his rescheduled presentation.
2:30 p.m. Friday, March 11
HEARING DOUBLE: JAZZ AND ONTOLOGY
Brian Kane, Yale University

Philosophers have often considered the ontology of music, worrying over the relation between works, scores and performances. Yet, surprisingly, jazz has not received the same consideration, even though jazz—where performances of works such as “standards” vary widely in their properties—represents an even more challenging ontological problem than found in classical music. In this talk, Brian Kane will argue for a non-essentialist, network-based ontology of jazz standards. This argument will depend on two basic operations—chains of replication and chains of nomination—that together provide a robust basis for judgments concerning a performance’s identity and individuation. Also, just as jazz is an exemplification of a network-based ontology of music, Kane will try to draw out some wider implications for the ontology of music more generally.
Location: 
Baur Room

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'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Annette Richards.2:30 p.m. Friday, April 1
SENSIBILITY TRIUMPHANT: C. P. E. BACH AND THE ART OF FEELING
Annette Richards, Cornell University

In Goethe’s Triumph der Empfindsamkeit (1777), sensibility, feeling and sympathy are brutally exposed as trivial obsessions with postures and props. Excess, bad taste and poor behavior are the focus of Goethe’s hilarious critique of the craze unleashed by his own Sorrows of Young Werther. Embodied in this strange and funny text is satire aimed not only at the cult of Empfindsamkeit and at the works of the artist himself, but also at the conspicuous blurring of public and private spheres, the untoward exposure of personal proclivities and private feeling. Given the ubiquitous textbook designation of C. P. E. Bach as the architect of the ‘Empfindsamer Stil’ in music, Dr. Annette Richards takes another look at what ‘Empfindsamkeit’ might mean, especially for the composer’s late keyboard works. By examining this music (along with then-contemporary views on humor, satire and other cultural elements), the audience may have to reconsider Bach’s own claims about the competing aesthetics of public and private music.
Location: 
Baur Room
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'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Janet Schmalfeldt.

2:30 p.m. Friday, April 15
DOMENICO SCARLATTI, ESCAPE ARTIST: SIGHTINGS OF HIS “MIXED STYLE” TOWARDS THE END OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
Janet Schmalfeldt, Tufts University Professor Emerita/Boston University Visiting Professor
Location: Baur Room

____________________

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Community Partner: ArtsWave

CCM’s Thinking About Music Series is sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, Ritter & Randolph, LLC, Corporate Counsel; along with support from Dean Landgren’s Office, the Graduate Student Association, and the Division of Composition, Musicology and Theory at CCM.

CCM News
CSO music director Louis Langrée.

CSO Director Louis Langrée Presents Free Lecture at CCM on Nov. 24

The UC Fellows of the Graduate School Distinguished Speaker Series welcomes acclaimed conductor Louis Langrée for a special guest lecture at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 24.

Poster for Louis Langree's Nov. 2015 lecture at CCM.Langrée serves as Music Director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Chief Conductor of the Camerata Salzburg and Music Director of the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center in New York.

During the 2015-16 season, his concerts with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra will include a Brahms Festival and three world premiere Concertos for Orchestra by Sebastian Currier, Thierry Escaich and Zhou Tian. They will also perform in New York as part of the 50th anniversary season of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers series. With the Camerata Salzburg, Langrée will tour Germany and other guest engagements include the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra (opening their annual Mendelssohn Festival) and performances of Così fan tutte with the Freiburger Barockorchester at the Aix-en-Provence Festival.

Langrée has worked with many other orchestras around the world including the London Symphony, London Philharmonic, Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Santa Cecilia in Rome, Sao Paulo, Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen and Budapest Festival orchestras. His festival appearances have included Wiener Festwochen, Salzburg Mozartwoche and Whitsun, BBC Proms and Glyndebourne Festival Opera. He has held positions as Music Director of the Orchestre de Picardie (1993-98) and Orchestre Philharmonique Royal de Liège (2001-06).

Langrée was Music Director of Opéra National de Lyon (1998-2000) and Glyndebourne Touring Opera (1998-2003). He has also conducted at La Scala, the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Opéra Comique, Opéra-Bastille and Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Dresden Staatsoper, Grand Théâtre in Geneva and the Netherlands Opera in Amsterdam.

Langrée’s first commercial recording with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra features Copland’s A Lincoln Portrait (narrated by Dr Maya Angelou) and world premieres by Nico Muhly and David Lang. Louis Langrée’s recordings have received several awards from Gramophone and Midem Classical. He was appointed Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres in 2006 and Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur in 2014.

His talk will address the challenges and rewards of a conductor in the 21st century.

Event Time
4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 24

Location
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Admission to this lecture is free and open to the general public. Reservations are not required.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

The Robert J. Werner Recital Hall is located on the 2000 level of CCM’s Mary Emery Hall. The recital hall’s lobby is directly accessible from level P3 of the CCM Garage. Enter CCM’s facilities through the garage entrances marked “Werner Recital Hall” (as opposed to “Corbett Center for the Performing Arts”) for easiest access to the hall’s lobby.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

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CCM Season Presenting Sponsor & Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Community Partner: ArtsWave

CCM News
Old 'Thinking About Music' lecture logo.

CCM’s ‘Thinking About Music’ Lecture Series Resumes on Feb. 6

Each semester, CCM welcomes distinguished experts for a series of free Friday afternoon musical discussions. This spring, the Thinking About Music lecture series will present five free public talks, beginning with a presentation by Tufts University Professor Joseph Auner on Friday, Feb. 6.

Sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, these music theory and history discussions feature diverse topics presented by distinguished experts from all over the United States and are designed to engage participants’ imaginations and to consider music in new ways.

This semester’s guest lecturers also include University of Minnesota Professor Michael Cherlin (Feb. 20), Cornell University Professor Annette Richards (March 6), National Jazz Museum Artistic Director Loren Schoenberg (March 13) and Eastman School of Music Professor Ellen Koskoff (April 17). See the listings below for more information on this semester’s presentation topics.

Since its inception in 1997, the Thinking About Music Series has presented over 120 lectures and one symposium by guests from a number of different colleges, universities, schools of music, foundations, institutes, museums and publications.

The subjects of the lectures have covered historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, along with the ancillary fields of organology, dance, music business and law, cognitive psychology, and the philosophy, theology and sociology of music.

Event Information
Unless otherwise indicated, all Thinking About Music lectures take place on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. in the Baur Room of CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts, which is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

These events are free and open to the public. All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu for the most current event information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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2015 SPRING JOSEPH AND FRANCES JONES POETKER THINKING ABOUT MUSIC LECTURE SERIES

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Guest speaker Joseph Auner.

2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 6
THE STOPPED CLOCK: SOME MOMENTS IN TONALITY AND TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1950
Joseph Auner, Tufts University

This talk will focus on the second half of the 20th century and two technologies that have contributed to different ways of working with tonality and tonal materials: namely, voltage controlled modular synthesizers and the tape loop. With reference to a wide range of music, Professor Joseph Auner will argue that the synthesizer and the tape loop, and related technologies like a tape-delay system, facilitated and required a kind of close listening to and manipulation of sound that could open up new perspectives on any acoustic phenomenon, including triads and tonal materials.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Guest speaker Michael Cherlin.

Guest speaker Michael Cherlin.

2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20
LUIGI NONO’S FRAGMENTE-STILLEAN DIOTIMA AND THE INEFFABLE
Michael Cherlin, University of Minnesota

The Romantic fragment, in poetry and music, points toward something that is ineffable – the sounds listeners hear point toward those that cannot be realized.  Whether it is beyond or still within Romanticism, it is this aesthetic that Michael Cherlin associates with Schoenberg and Webern, most particularly. Nono’s string quartet, a meditation on Diotima, continues that tradition. The lecture will explore the implications of this composition for a poetics of musical interpretation (whose falsifying “scientific” name is analysis).
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Guest speaker Annette Richards.

Guest speaker Annette Richards.

2:30 p.m. Friday, March 6
This talk has been postponed due to weather-related flight delays.
SENSIBILITY TRIUMPHANT: C. P. E. BACH AND THE ART OF FEELING
Dr. Annette Richards, Cornell University
In Goethe’s Triumph der Empfindsamkeit (1777), sensibility, feeling and sympathy are brutally exposed as trivial obsessions with postures and props. Excess, bad taste and poor behaviour are the focus of Goethe’s hilarious critique of the craze unleashed by his own Sorrows of Young Werther. Embodied in this strange and funny text is satire aimed not only at the cult of Empfindsamkeit and at the works of the artist himself, but also at the conspicuous blurring of public and private spheres, the untoward exposure of personal proclivities and private feeling. Given the ubiquitous text-book designation of C. P. E. Bach as the architect of the ‘Empfindsamer Stil’ in music, Dr. Annette Richards takes another look at what ‘Empfindsamkeit’ might mean, especially for Bach’s late keyboard works. Revisiting the broader cultural contexts within which Bach lived and worked, she will map out the contemporary landscape of feeling constructed by critical and literary texts, as well as musical and visual artworks (including portraits in Bach’s collection). She hopes to suggest that some of Bach’s late music, especially the rondos and fantasias, complicate humour with satire and pathos with parody, in a way that presents a complex and disconcerting picture of what it might mean to sympathise, and to feel, musically. In the process, Bach’s own claims about the competing aesthetics of public and private music will be reconsidered.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Guest speaker Loren Schoenberg.

Guest speaker Loren Schoenberg.

2:30 p.m. Friday, March 13
LESTER YOUNG: NEW DISCOVERIES
Loren Schoenberg, Artistic Director, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem

As an American jazz tenor saxophonist and a member of Count Basie’s orchestra, Lester Young was one of the young genre’s most influential forces. In the last few years, a significant amount of previously unheard recordings have shed new light on his innovations. As Loren Schoenberg will attest, every surviving sound recorded by Young is vital, since there are no documents that capture the qualities that his peers remember most vividly.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
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Guest speaker Ellen Koskoff.

Guest speaker Ellen Koskoff.

2:30 p.m. Friday, April 17
IS ETHNOMUSICOLOGY INHERENTLY FEMINIST?
Dr. Ellen Koskoff, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester
Dr. Ellen Koskoff will present excerpts from her recent book, A Feminist Ethnomusicology. In the process, she will raise several important questions. What, if anything, is feminist about ethnomusicology? What do fieldwork, ethnography and music contribute to the process of dismantling hierarchies of power based on gender? Furthermore, what does feminism contribute to a deeper understanding of social and musical difference? These questions will set the stage for a lively discussion.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
____________________

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Community Partner: ArtsWave

CCM’s Thinking About Music Series is sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, Ritter & Randolph, LLC, Corporate Counsel; along with support from Dean Landgren’s Office, the Graduate Student Association, and the Division of Composition, Musicology and Theory at CCM.

CCM News

CCM Welcomes Graham Johnson for Public Lecture and Master Class on March 26

GrahamJohnson528

Acclaimed vocal accompanist Graham Johnson will in residence at CCM from March 25 – 30, 2014.

CCM welcomes distinguished pianist and Benjamin Britten scholar Graham Johnson for a public lecture and open master class beginning at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 26, in Robert J. Werner Recital Hall.

Johnson will provide a lecture on Britten’s life and solo vocal works for approximately one hour, followed by a 90 minute master class with three teams of CCM students. This event is free and open to the general public.

Recognized as one of the world’s leading vocal accompanists, Johnson will be in residence at CCM throughout the week as a part of this season’s Benjamin Britten Centenary Celebration.

About Graham Johnson
Graham Johnson is recognized as one of the world’s leading vocal accompanists. Born in Rhodesia, he came to London to study in 1967. After leaving the Royal Academy of Music his teachers included Gerald Moore and Geoffrey Parsons. In 1972 he was the official pianist at Peter Pears’ first master classes at The Maltings, Snape which brought him into contact with Benjamin Britten—a link which strengthened his determination to accompany. In 1976 he formed the Songmakers’ Almanac to explore neglected areas of piano-accompanied vocal music; the founder singers were Dame Felicity Lott, Ann Murray DBE, Anthony Rolfe Johnson and Richard Jackson—artists with whom he has established long and fruitful collaborations both on the concert platform and the recording studio. Some two hundred and fifty Songmakers’ programmes were presented over the years.

CCM News

CCM Presents Wickedly Witty French Opera ‘L’Étoile’ This Week

Here's a peek at rehearsals for L’Étoile, which runs Feb. 14 - 16, 2014.

Here’s a peek at rehearsals for L’Étoile, which runs Feb. 14 – 16, 2014.

CCM’s acclaimed Studio Series continues this month with a vivacious new production of Emmanuel Chabrier’s three-act opera L’Étoile. Performed in French with English supertitles, L’Étoile runs Feb. 14-16 in CCM’s Cohen Family Studio Theater. Admission is free, but reservations are required.

Conducted by guest artist Kevin Murphy with stage direction by CCM’s J. Ralph Corbett Distinguished Chair in Opera Robin Guarino, L’Étoile is set in a mystical fairy tale kingdom where lovelorn hopes, turned tables and comedic misunderstandings inevitably lead to a happy ending.

“It’s a story of ‘boy meets girl’ after wishing on a star,” Guarino explains. Audiences will delight in this comedic opera, full of outlandish characters who know how to deliver an aria. Guarino describes CCM’s production as “an elegant and absurdist romp with a hint of political satire.”

CCM welcomes guest speaker and dramaturg Cori Ellison for a pre-performance lecture at 7 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 14, in Mary Emery Hall Room 3225. This talk is free and open to the general public.

CCM News

From Ovid to Mary Zimmerman: A Classicist Introduces the Metamorphoses

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This Saturday at 1:15 p.m., UC’s Department of Classics will host a FREE “Classical Conversation,” presented in conjunction with CCM’s Mainstage Series production of Metamorphoses.

Come and take a behind-the-scenes look at the world of Ovid and myth that inspired Mary Zimmerman’s award-winning drama with UC Professor of Classics Lauren Ginsberg.

Zimmerman has often noted how Ovid’s epic of mythological transformations inspired her Tony Award winning stage production. In particular, she is fascinated by how stories removed from us in time and space can help articulate timeless truths about human nature. Ginsberg’s talk will further explore the fascinating Ovidian background to Zimmerman’s text.

CCM News

CCM E-Media Welcomes Fox Senior Vice President of Marketing for Guest Lecture This Week

Senior Vice President of Marketing for the FOX Broadcasting Company Nick Belperio.

Senior Vice President of Marketing for the FOX Broadcasting Company Nick Belperio.

CCM’s Division of Electronic Media welcomes guest speaker Nick Belperio to the Cohen Family Studio Theater from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 24. The Senior Vice President of Marketing for the FOX Broadcasting Co., Belperio will provide an inside look at the development, promotion and evaluation of the new hit television drama Sleepy Hollow, scheduled to air Monday nights on FOX. This presentation is free and open to the general public.

Belperio was named Senior Vice President of Affiliate Marketing in November 2007. He is responsible for supervision of the network’s Affiliate Marketing team, which oversees marketing and promotion at 209 FOX affiliates across the U.S., as well as its National Radio Promotion department. Belperio also helps guide the general objectives of the network’s marketing team, effectively maximizing affiliate TV stations’ air across all dayparts, producing creative launch kits and promo merchandise, as well as maintaining significant presence on local websites and social media platforms.

CCM News

The CCM Drama Dadaab Theater Project and the Great Globe Foundation Host Symposium on Jan. 17

DadaabTheaterProjectIn June of 2011, six current and former students from CCM Drama traveled to Nairobi, Kenya, for five intense days of theatre-making with refugees from the Dadaab Refugee Camp. The outcome of that trip will be explored in a special symposium hosted by the CCM Drama Dadaab Theater Project and the Great Globe Foundation from 3-6 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 17, in UC’s Cohen Family Studio Theater.

Titled “How the Hurt Helped and How the Help Hurt and Why Go Through It All Again,” the afternoon discussion will explore the successes and challenges faced by artists who engage in international outreach and exchange. The symposium is free and open to the public. CCM Professor of Drama Michael Burnham will moderate.

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