Program Spotlight: CCM Classical Guitar

Declared “one of this country’s leading conservatories” by the New York Times, CCM provides first-rate Bachelor of Music and Master of Music programs in Classical Guitar. Applications are open to join CCM’s fall 2021 class; apply by December 1.

Study is strongly performance-based and the cornerstone of the program is private lessons with faculty, who serve as mentors for students and direct their individual musical, performing and teaching growth.

Classical Guitar curriculum emphasizes the development of the well-rounded, holistic musician by providing a solid background in music history and theory as well as areas specific to each musical medium. Undergraduate students enjoy a close collaboration with the University of Cincinnati through a general education core that supplements their education with academic course work while graduate students specialize more precisely in their chosen field.

“In the CCM guitar program we never neglect the past, but we can’t afford to pretend we don’t live in the present,” says Chris Wilke, director of CCM Classical Guitar. “Our ultimate goal is to prepare true musicians for a professional career in the 21st century.”

All incoming students in 2021-22 will receive an iPad, which will be equipped for audio-visual work to help students gain digital career skills crucial for 21st-century musicians.

Program highlights include:

  • Free iPad to all incoming 2021-22 classical guitar students
  • Generous scholarships available for promising students
  • Chamber music and networking opportunities
  • Opportunities to explore historical plucked instruments and broaden skill sets
  • 21st-century digital career integration

Applications and Additional Information

CCM is now accepting applications for fall 2021. The application deadline is December 1. Learn more at ccm.uc.edu/admissions.

Learn more about the CCM Classical Guitar program.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes
CCM Village at night

CCM’s Music Theory and Musicology Society hosts student conference Sept. 11-12, 2020

CCM Village at night

The conference is designed to engage UC and non-UC students in the broad field of music scholarship

The Music Theory and Musicology Society (MTMS) at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) hosts its eighth biennial student conference on Sept. 11 and 12, 2020 (rescheduled from April 3-4). Entitled “Conversations in Music,” the conference is designed to engage both UC students and students from other institutions in the broad field of music scholarship.

The conference features keynote speakers Daniel Goldmark (Case Western Reserve University) and Jennifer Beavers (University of Texas at San Antonio). It will be held in conjunction with the long-running Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Thinking About Music Lecture Series at CCM.

The conference will include pre-recorded video presentations and live interactive sessions held virtually via Zoom. Please fill out the registration form below to receive emails with further information and links to access the presentation videos and Zoom platform.

Please note that the times listed in the schedule are in Eastern time zone.

Schedule

Friday, Sept. 11

2 p.m.

PIXAR’S MEMORIES: CONTEMPORARY CARTOON MUSIC SPEAKS TO THE PAST
Daniel Goldmark, Case Western Reserve University

The ever-increasing popularity of Hollywood animation, driven in part by the dominance of Pixar, has come about not just through technological advances or the breaking down of decades-old biases about cartoons being just for kids, but also through the emotionally nuanced storytelling deployed recently by studios. While practically all of Pixar’s features are overrun with issues of nostalgia, their more recent films—Inside OutFinding DoryCars 3Incredibles 2Toy Story 4—do more than simply revel in the remembrance of times past (real or imagined): they also explore the creation of memory and the reasons why memories fade or endure. Sound and music have played key roles in the recollections and impressions of all these films. In this presentation, I look at trends in scoring and sound design in animation to show how the melodies of childhood—and adulthood—are being used to drive the stories of recent Hollywood animated features—and how these stories revolve around how our notions of the past speak to the present and guide our future.


4:30 p.m.

MEET-AND-GREET “RECEPTION”


5:30 p.m.

PRESENTER Q&A SESSION


Saturday, Sept. 12

8-9:30 a.m.

CONFERENCE WORKSHOP
This year’s conference will include a workshop led by ethnomusicologist and CCM faculty member Scott Linford, PhD, inviting conference participants to engage in an interactive discussion focused on the application of sound studies in the areas of musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology.


10 a.m.-2 p.m.

PRESENTER Q&A SESSIONS


2 p.m.

The Music Theory and Musicology Society Conference Keynote
RAVEL’S SONIC ILLUSIONS
Jennifer Beavers, University of Texas at San Antonio
Ravel’s interwar compositions and transcriptions reveal a sophisticated engagement with timbre and orchestration. Of interest, is the way he uses timbre to connect and conceal passages in his music. In this talk, I look at the way he manipulates instrumental timbre to create sonic illusions that transform expectations, mark the form, and create meaning. I examine how he uses instrumental groupings to create distinct or blended auditory events. Using a sound-based analytical approach, I develop these descriptions of timbre and auditory scenes to interpret ways in which different timbre-spaces function. Through techniques such as timbral transformations, magical effects, and timbre and contour fusion, I examine the ways in which Ravel conjures sound objects in his music that are imaginary, transformative or illusory.


Conference Registration

Register for the conference by filling out an online form.

CCM’s Music Theory and Musicology Society engages all interested members of the UC community to discuss issues relating to music theory and musicology. The MTMS regularly maintains forums for the purpose of discussing theoretical, historical and cultural topics in music. Past MTMS Conference programs are available online.

Please e­mail all inquiries to MTMS Executive Board Members Rebecca Schreiber, Jacy Pedersen, Hannah Blanchette and Kabelo Chirwa at ccm.mtms@gmail.com.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

Alumnus recruits MLB stars and musicians for virtual rendition of ‘Take Me Out to the Ballgame’

Warm up for the start of the Major League Baseball season with a special virtual performance of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” that showcases UC College-Conservatory of Music students and alumni with MLB players. The performance is available to watch online.

Alumnus Harrison Sheckler (BM Piano, ’19) brought 200 people together for the performance, which was professionally produced with help from former Cincinnati Reds pitcher Bronson Arroyo. The performance features singers and musicians from CCM and the Brooklyn College. Filling out the roster for the project are Bret Saberhagen (pitcher in the Royals Hall of Fame and 1985 World Series champion and former Met); Jim Day (FOX Red’s baseball announcer); Susan Roush Dellinger (author of “Red Legs and Black Sox” and granddaughter of Baseball Hall of Famer Edd Roush); Nick Martinez (pitcher for the Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters of Nippon Professional Baseball and former Ranger’s pitcher); Aristides Aquino (Red’s outfielder); Dale Scott (Former MLB umpire) and many others.

The video features 22 CCM students and alumni representing multiple areas of the college including violin, cello, clarinet, double bass, oboe, flute, piano, harp, horn and more. It also includes CCM Professor of Music (Tuba and Euphonium) Tim Northcut. It was produced by CCM Commercial Music Production alumni Armin Meyer and Grant Bayer, who are audio engineers at Cincinnati’s Zated Records. Many of these students and alumni also participated in Sheckler’s virtual performance of “You’ll Never Walk Alone.” CCM students and alumni involved in the “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” performance include:

  • Armin Meyer (BM Commercial Music Production, ’18)
  • Grant Bayer (BM Commercial Music Production, ’18)
  • Natalie Orth (BM Violin, ’20)
  • Jonathan Lin (BM Violoncello, ’18)
  • Carolyn Regula – former DMA Violoncello student
  • Peter Ryan (MM Violoncello, ’19) – current DMA Violoncello current
  • Sarah Minnemanm – current DMA Oboe student
  • Patrick Grimone (BM Oboe, ’19)
  • Taylor Overholt (BM Clarinet, ’19)
  • Collin Goff – current BM Music Education and Clarinet
  • David Goist (BM Violin, ’16; MM Violin, ’18)
  • Kanako Shimasaki – current DMA Violin student
  • Taylor Fleshman (BM Harp, ’18)
  • Evan Sacks-Wilner – current BM Tuba student
  • Li-han Eliza Tseng (DMA Violoncello, ’19)
  • Katie Riley – current BM Flute student
  • Ryan Penshorn – former BM Horn student
  • Eliza Edge (BM Horn, ’19)
  • Phillip Palmore (BM Horn, ’20)
  • Taiga Benito – current BM Double Bass student
  • Harrison Sheckler (BM Piano, ’19)
  • Tim Garner (BM Commercial Music Production, ’19)

The performance has earned media attention from the Cincinnati EnquirerWGN-TVBackstage and Spectrum News.

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CCM Arts Administration Student wins Gena Branscombe Project Award

In its inaugural year, the Gena Branscombe Project has awarded its 2020 scholarships to four women, including UC College-Conservatory of Music Arts Administration student Sydney Pepper. The scholarships support the winners in their continuing pursuit of undergraduate and graduate studies and shine “a light on exceptional emerging, talented, women in music.”

CCM Arts Administration student Sydney Pepper. Photo/Provided.

CCM Arts Administration student Sydney Pepper. Photo/Provided.

Named after influential composer and advocate of contemporary American music Gena Branscombe (1881-1977), the Project awarded Pepper the 2020 Emerging Arts Administrator scholarship. It also awarded the 2020 Emerging Composer scholarship to Catherine Willingham, the 2020 Emerging Conductor scholarship to Genevieve Welch and gave a 2020 Emerging Conductor Honorable Mention award to Michaela Gleason. Read more about the award winners in the online announcement.

Pepper will begin her second year in CCM’s MA/MBA Arts Administration program in August. Her experience in Cincinnati spans from working in CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement to the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. She was originally scheduled to serve as a development intern for the Opera Theatre of St. Louis this summer, but COVID-19 cancelled those plans. Instead, Pepper is doing development work for both the Portland Bach Experience in Maine and for the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company.

“The [CCM] Arts Admin program has transformed and expanded my love of the field,” says Pepper, who previously attended Clark University to pursue a vocal performance degree. “A year ago, I couldn’t have imagined the amount of knowledge that I would have gained throughout this year, but I am so very grateful. Not only am I grateful for all of the learning opportunities, but I could never express enough my gratitude to Professors Jean Hamilton and Rebecca Bromels as well as my cohort, all of whom have made a year full of uncertainty and challenges so, so much easier.”

Pepper’s first experience as an arts administrator was with the Portland Bach Experience, where she began as an intern and worked her way to Festival Manager. In her senior year at Clark University, she served as the Marketing and Box Office Coordinator for Music Worcester, Inc. and as the President of the Clark University Choirs. Under her supervision, the Clark University Choirs performed a 21st century revival of lost composer Gena Branscombe’s Pilgrims of Destiny.

About the Gena Branscombe Project

The Gena Branscombe Project is dedicated to the revival and performance of the music of American composer and conductor Gena Branscombe. Founded by Branscombe experts and family members, the project seeks to continue the spirit of Branscombe’s lifelong example of inspiring women in music, by awarding three yearly scholarships in her honor. All proceeds of the revived music go to support the yearly scholarships. The project is run by Kathleen Shimeta, Daniel P. Ryan and Regan Siglin.

About Gena Branscombe

The legacy of Gena Branscombe (1881-1977) is that of composer, conductor and leader of women in music. Composing over 150 arts songs, chamber music, piano pieces and choral works, they were available from 23 different publishers. As a conductor she led MacDowell choruses, the Chicago Women’s Symphony, college choirs, women’s club choruses and her own Branscombe Choral. These groups under her direction performed music by American composers and in particular, American women composers. Holding national office Branscombe was a member of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs, National League of American Pen Women, National Federation of Music Clubs, Society of American Women Composers, Altrusa International and more. At meetings on the state and local levels she encouraged women to be active in their communities’ music organizations and to perform at their own meetings. She organized and presented programs of American music for club members to use as guidelines for programming. Branscombe was a wife, mother of four, pianist, composer, conductor and leader of women whose legacy inspires the Gena Branscombe Project scholarships.

CCM News Student Salutes
A photo of the entrance to the CCM Atrium on UC's campus. Photo/UC Creative + Brand.

CCM Alumna Karen Zhang Wins Prestigious MTNA Teacher Fellowship

CCM alumna Karen Zhang (BM Piano Performance, ’16; MM Piano Performance, ’18) is the 2020 recipient of the Music Teachers National Association’s MarySue Harris Studio Teacher Fellowship. This $3,000 grant, funded by the MarySue Harris Endowment Fund, is presented annually to a recently graduated independent studio music teacher who demonstrates commitment to the music teaching profession and outstanding studio development.

Karen ZhangDuring her time at CCM, Zhang studied with CCM Professor of Piano Eugene Pridonoff and Associate Professor of Piano Soyeon Kate Lee. Zhang was a winner of CCM’s Van Cliburn Scholarship Competition and the Glenn Miller Society Scholarship Competition, as well as the first-place winner of the $9,400 prize at Three Arts Scholarship Competition. She also participated in the 2017 Pianofest, held in Hampton, New York. As a CCM master’s degree student, she was a graduate assistant in secondary piano.

After graduation, Zhang and her husband Jaesung Kim founded their Cincinnati-based piano studio, Musical Moments. Her students have been winners of numerous competitions, including the University of Kentucky’s Nathaniel Patch Piano Competition, OhioMTA Auditions Festival and the 88 Tri-State Piano Concerto Competition. Many of her students have also been recognized with Distinction-level certificates from the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music. Zhang has been invited to teach and perform in numerous pre-colleges and venues in Asia, including those in Seoul, Chengdu, Chongqing, Taishan and Beijing.

Zhang has also taught through the City Gospel Mission’s Whiz Kids Music Program, an after-school program that gives music classes and lessons to students in the Cincinnati area whose schools do not offer music classes. CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement connects collegiate students with teaching and mentoring opportunities through the CCM AfterSchool program, which has partnered with Whiz Kids, Cincinnati Public Schools and other education and community organizations.

About MTNA and MarySue Harris

MTNA is a nonprofit organization of some 20,000 independent and collegiate music teachers committed to furthering the art of music through teaching, performance, composition and scholarly research. Founded in 1876, MTNA is the oldest professional music teachers’ association in the United States.

MarySue Harris, a long-time MTNA member from Nebraska, has devoted her teaching career to nurturing young music students. Her commitment to pedagogy and the beginning music teacher led to her establishment of the MarySue Harris Endowment Fund.


Story by CCM Graduate Student Alexandra Doyle

Featured image at top: Memorial Hall, which is part of the CCM Village on UC’s campus. Photo/UC Creative + Brand.

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News

Donor Spotlight: Dr. Alvin and Jean Crawford

The Crawfords have a deep, lifelong love of music and the arts that led them to connect with CCM

Dr. Alvin Crawford, retired Chief of Orthopedics and founding director of the Spine Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, has had a distinguished, internationally renowned career as an orthopedic surgeon. In his honor, the Spine Center was renamed the Crawford Spine Center.

But his first love was music.

He started playing trumpet in seventh grade, eventually switching to clarinet. He started college as a music major and wanted a career as a studio musician. In his sophomore year of college, he made a decision that changed the lives of thousands of children across the world: he decided to become a physician.

Dr. Alvin and Jean Crawford stand in the corridor of CCM's Mary Emery Hall. Photo/Joseph Rubino

Dr. Alvin and Jean Crawford stand in the corridor of CCM’s Mary Emery Hall. Photo/Joseph Rubino

Dr. Crawford attended Meharry Medical College in 1960, a time when most if not all southern schools were segregated. He applied for admission to the University of Tennessee and became the first African-American to enroll in this southern medical school. He could not transfer because the University of Tennessee did not consider Meharry Medical College an accredited medical school.

“I became an academic orthopedist, but continued to play,” he says. “I was hired by UC to head the Pediatric Orthopaedic service. Once my wife and I found out what CCM was all about, we decided to get involved. After I retired at Cincinnati Children’s, I was able to attend the jazz improvisation course for freshmen and we started coming to performances. Last year I took jazz history.”

Continuing to live out his love of music, Dr. Crawford helped form a group called “The Wannabes,” which plays for nonprofits and has played an opera gala. From there he joined the Queen City Concert band, a community band in Cincinnati.

Jean Crawford’s interest in music stretches back to the piano lessons she took as a child. She was a teacher and high school counselor and sang in choruses through college.

“I always encouraged my students to get involved and take any type of arts as electives,” she says. “When I served on the Cincinnati Opera board, I saw that most of our singers in the chorus were from CCM. When we attended CCM’s Moveable Feast, we realized the caliber of musicianship here and were hooked on CCM.”

Mrs. Crawford talks about the opportunity she did not have, but that she wants all children to have. “I lived in the segregated south and the opportunities to attend and participate in the arts were limited,” she says. “So my goal is to make sure that the performing arts are available to all communities. In this area, school districts have limited support for funding the arts. Through the prep schools, CCM provides arts exposure to them. Also, students from CCM go to public schools to give the children more exposure. I think that’s important. And to do that you need money.“

“I think they’re doing something [at CCM] that’s really important,” Dr. Crawford adds. “I became involved in the CCM Dean’s Advisory Council and I can see that the people here care. They care, and they want to put out a good product. And once I became involved with CCMpower, I was able to meet the kids and see what they’re doing.”


Who will you empower NEXT?

In order to recruit and retain top talent, CCM must be able to offer competitive scholarship and grant opportunities to our students. CCMpower raises funds through membership and special events in order to provide the resources that attract the best and brightest students. Learn more about how you can empower the next generation of CCM stars.


Story by Joseph Rubino

Featured image at top Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, Dena Cranley, Barbara Gould, Jean Crawford and Dr. Alvin Crawford at CCM’s 2020 Moveable Feast. Photo/Andrew Higley

CCM News Student Salutes
Spring scenes on campus, CCM.

CCM Offers Arts Classes to all UC Students in Summer 2020

Spring scenes on campus, CCM.

UC’s College-Conservatory of Music offers general studies and fine arts elective courses during six different sessions in summer 2020. These credit-granting courses cover a wide range of topics and are open to UC and non-UC students alike.

Turn your laptop into a musical instrument and play with a virtual band or learn how to play piano in music performance classes. Learn about the technical elements of media production in electronic media classes. Study the music of The Beatles and Pink Floyd, examine the trending styles of today’s popular music or learn about the evolution of Japanese Pop, anime and video game music in music appreciation classes.

Select a session from the list below to view elective courses offered by CCM during the summer.

Full Academic Session: May 11-August 8

Group Piano for Non-music Majors (3 credits)
PIAN 1001-001; TR 10:10-11:05 a.m. and online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
Designed for those with little or no piano experience; teaches the fundamentals of reading music, playing by ear, using chord charts, and improving finger flexibility.


Music of the Beatles (3 credits)
FAM 2061-001; online
FAM 2061-002; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture and Ethics
The Music of the Beatles has made an impact in the whole world both musically and sociologically. The Beatles are considered one of the most influential bands of any era. Their music reflects the cultural and social revolution of the 1960s and serves as a model for understanding all subsequent popular music. This class will chronologically trace the development of the Beatles from their early days through the band’s dissolution. There will be analysis of selected compositions with regard to lyrics, harmony, song structure, instrumentation and arranging. This class will examine their groundbreaking production techniques, individual writing styles and the impact of their music on other musicians and social trends.


May-Mester (Session M): May 11-31

Jazz Appreciation (3 credits)
FAM 2051-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture and Ethics
A one-semester overview of America’s true art form: jazz. The course will introduce students to the various styles of jazz, its major performers, its history and origins and will also involve attending jazz performances at CCM or elsewhere.


Jammin’ with Laptops Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
In this course, you will play, record and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session; Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2) and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3). In Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the Midterm Exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In Units 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1-2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2-4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the Final Exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.


What’s Hot in Popular Music (3 credits)
FAM 2062-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
This online course examines current popular music in its trending styles and genres. Students will critique selected songs from the weekly “Billboard” charts and various other media resources, including YouTube and digital download statistics, and consider both the hottest artists as well as promising up-and-comers. Students will develop skills for evaluating artistic intent with respect to lyrics, some basic literary techniques, melody, harmony, rhythm, song form and psychology, and with a look at cutting edge production techniques. Students will identify and compare unique composing and performing styles of today’s artists and identify links between the music business and societal trends. Weekly activity will include reading, viewing, and listening to examples online and completing assignments on Canopy.


First Half Term (Session D): May 11-June 23

American Music Online (3 credits)
FAM 2006-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives
An online history of music in America c. 1620 to the present. Musical life as we experience it in the U.S. today is the product of a history that is in many ways unique, but never far from world-wide influences. This course surveys a wide variety of music along with the social, political and religious movements that have shaped American musical life right up to the present. It examines the contributions of numerous cultural groups, regional developments over four centuries and the ways music reflects values, aspirations and problems of the population. Course topics include musical genres, styles, personalities and trends. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes and videos are all online. No prior experience with music required.


Experimental Rock (3 credits)
FAM 2013-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, TI Technology & Innovation
This course will provide a detailed overview of the tools, techniques and musical styles which had a tremendous impact on the aesthetic of various genres of rock music in the 1960s and ‘70s, the resonance of which can be observed in many mainstream and non-mainstream musical trends of the last 30 years. It will begin with an examination of multi-tracking tape machines: their development and techniques such as sound on sound, tape-delay and flange, which had become standard practice in studios by the late 1960s. This is followed by a technical overview of electronic instruments, specifically the synthesizer, whose development will be traced from the Theremin. Musical trends such as the 1950s avant-garde and Minimalism will serve as a bridge to examinations of seminal bands such as the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Kraftwerk, Can, Neu:, Brian Eno and the Talking Heads among others; the technical knowledge gained from the initial lectures on tape techniques and electronic instruments will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the music of these artists.


History of Rock and Roll 1
FAM 3031-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication
Rock and Roll had humble beginnings in the Southeastern United States, but over time it developed into a force beyond mere entertainment that has defined youth culture on a global scale. Rock and roll culture is embedded in the fabric of youth identity. Rock and roll music is a commodity that young people use daily, often with an obsessive devotion. Marketing campaigns that target youth are so relentless that young people are under enormous media and social pressure to join the ranks of consumers. The goal of History of Rock and Roll is, therefore, threefold: 1. To provide for students a chronological survey that examines the relationship between the music, its most successful and colorful artists, the associated recording technology and the impact of the genre on American culture; 2. Through critical listening and reading, the course will provide students with useful, evaluative tools so that they can make historically informed and thoughtful decisions about the music they select and enjoy; 3. Finally, the course will encourage students to seek and appreciate new styles, and perhaps inspire those who seek a career as a pop music artist.


Music Appreciation Online (3 credits)
FAM 2005-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture and Ethics
An online course that introduces students to a wide range of music in the Western World, covering several historical periods, including our own time. Examines musical styles, musical terms, composers and other aspects of the music listening experience. Considers the historical and cultural context of musical activity and the way it has shaped the musical life from medieval Europe up to the present in our own communities. Students will discuss their own experiences with music and have the opportunity to attend a musical performance of their choice, near where they live, for class credit. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, videos and film are all online. No prior experience with music required.


Summer A (Session A): June 1-July 5

Japanese Pop, Anime & Video Game Music (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture and Ethics
You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.


Integrated Media Production 1 for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 1015-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: TI Technology and Innovation
Media convergence is a vital component of our new media culture. In new media there is a melding of production, design and message with user-experience. Integrated Media Production I is an introductory course, the first of a two-course sequence within the E-Media major or E-Media minor at CCM, that provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation in the intersecting worlds of digital media production, content development and new media design. This course is an overview of concepts and processes in convergent media production.


Second Half Term (Session E): June 24-August 8

Media in Your Life Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 1011-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: TI Technology & Innovation
Did you know that the typical American spends about 11 hours a day consuming media? Think about that for a moment. How long is a typical workday? How many hours a night do you sleep? Could it be, based upon time usage alone, that media consumption is the most important activity in our lives? Whether those comments frighten you or inspire you, the fact remains that the media industry plays an enormously important role in our individual lives, is vital to the success of every major industry and is foundational to the effective functioning of our representative democracy. Would you like to possess a more sophisticated understanding of the media production process and its artistic and theoretical underpinnings? Wouldn’t you like to know more about the latest digital production tools? Do you think you might want to pursue a media career? If you answered “yes” to any one of these questions, then Media in Your Life is exactly the right course for you.


Summer B (Session B): July 6-August 8

Integrated Media Production 2 for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 1016-001; online
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: TI Technology and Innovation
Building on the concepts and production techniques introduced in Integrated Media Production 1, Integrated Media Production 2 explores the connections between digital media, content development and new media design in more depth. The course focuses on screen design issues relevant to the convergence of media assets, such as video and audio, with graphical assets in the communication of message. Topics include digital image production, GUI design, expanded Web design and production and digital aesthetics. Focal point, theme and design rightness are emphasized. There is instruction in industry-standard software tools, fundamental Web technologies and basic scripting languages.


Registration Details

UC students can register online by logging on to their Catalyst account at catalyst.uc.edu.

Non-UC students can begin the registration process by visiting uc.edu/pathways/nonmatric.html.

For information on course fees please refer to financialaid.uc.edu/fees/costs20.html

*The course information posted above is accurate as of Feb. 24, 2020. Consult the UC course offerings available at classes.catalystatuc.org/search/ for possible schedule changes.

CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Offers Arts Classes to All UC Students in Spring 2020

CCM offers dozens of different general studies and fine arts elective courses in spring 2020. These credit-granting courses are open to all UC students and cover a wide range of topics including dance, movies and media, music and theatre arts!

Master the hip-hop dance moves seen in current music videos or learn the basics of modern dance and ballet in CCM’s dance classes. Film a digital video or binge-watch classic movies, Disney animated musicals and TV sitcoms in movie and media appreciation classes.

CCM’s music appreciation classes cover the music of Woodstock, The Beatles, Japanese Pop and more, or students can study women’s impact on music and the impact of music on politics. Students can also turn their laptops into musical instruments and jam with a virtual band, or learn how to play the piano and guitar in hands-on music performance classes.

In theatre appreciation classes students can study the history of theatre, explore how Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton revolutionized musical theatre, learn the craft of acting or stage design and more!

CCM’s spring 2020 arts elective classes are offered online or in person; view a complete list of class offerings below. Find the most up-to-date information and register at catalyst.uc.edu.

Dance Classes

Advanced Intermediate Ballet II (3 credits)
FAM 1021-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 2-3:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course is intended for non-Dance majors with prior training in classical ballet at the advanced/intermediate level. It is repeatable and is offered each semester. The ballet class will consist of a traditional ballet barre followed by center practice and enchantment following the usual progression. A preexisting knowledge of the ballet French terminology is required in addition to the physical mastery and overall knowledge of classical ballet expected at the advanced/intermediate level.


Ballet Basics (3 credits)
FAM 1011-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
FAM 1011-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 7:30-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This is an introductory course for any non-major wishing to learn the fundamentals of classical ballet technique. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women; white T-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men), learning the essentials of traditional classical ballet. We will study the French terminology associated with the movement and poses we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form, including historical perspective, origin, and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.


Ballet Conditioning for Athletes (3 credits)
FAM 1019-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This is a beginning level of ballet designed especially for athletes and dance team members. As well as focusing on increasing the skill and artistry level within the parameters of classical ballet, the student will also learn to understand the historical perspectives of the art form and the value it has to the culture of society. Within the framework of the traditional ballet class, students will focus on developing strong core muscles, as well as lengthening and toning of the body with additional mat work and conditioning exercises, as part of the conditioning program. Daily proper attire is expected for this class. Exercise bands and mat or towel are also required.


Beginning Ballet II (3 credits)
FAM 1016-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 2-3:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This is a continuation of FAM 1015 Beginning Ballet I for any non-major wishing to learn the fundamentals of classical ballet technique or student who has had an introductory ballet course in the past. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women/ white t-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men) learning the essentials of a traditional classical ballet class. We will study the French terminology associated with the movement and poses we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form including historical perspective, origin, and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.


Beginning Modern Dance I (3 credits)
FAM 1025-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

In this course for non-dance majors, students are introduced to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values.


Beginning Modern Dance II (3 credits)
FAM 1026-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

In this course for non-dance majors, students continue to develop the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will continue to explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also continue to develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values.


Dance Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1095-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This ONLINE course introduces dance as a performing art, focusing on the Western European and American dance forms of Ballet, Modern and Contemporary. The course will trace their development, historical development and cultural characteristics. Additional course topics will include viewing live dance performances.


Hip-Hop Dance (1 Credit)
FAM 1030-001 (Monday, 5:30-6:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

A beginning/intermediate level dance course with no experience required. This class is designed to teach the fundamentals of Hip-Hop through choreographed dances. Hip-Hop style similar to that seen on current music videos will be the style taught in class. Individual work, floor work, and partner work will be emphasized. Combinations will be performed to Rap and R & B music.


Intermediate Modern Dance II (3 credits)
FAM 1028-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 9:05-10 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

A one semester, repeatable (by audition or permission of instructor) course for non-dance majors, providing a more sophisticated approach to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will also continue to explore and further develop fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the cultivation of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool within our society.


Intermediate Ballet II (3 credits)
FAM 1018-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This is a ballet course designed for dancers with previous ballet training. It is a repeatable course for the non-major wishing to further pursue the complexities and artistic nuances of classical ballet technique. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women/ white t-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men) learning the essentials of a traditional classical ballet class. We will study the French terminology associated with more complex movement and positions we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form including historical perspective, origin and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.


Legends of Dance in America – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1094-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course introduces dance legends of Ballet, Modern and Contemporary Dance, their significant contribution to the world of dance in America, as well as the passion and insight that brought the legends to their height of success. Additional course topics include viewing live dance performances.


Modern Dance Basics – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1022-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

In this course for non-dance majors, students are introduced to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values. Through interactive online instruction students use recording devices (e.g., smartphones, laptops, and camcorders) to develop their dance technique while building a dance community. To complete assignments students may film the dances with friends and/or family in locations of their choosing (e.g., dorm room, apartment, basement, backyard, park, and riverside). Students may also utilize the 414 Video Production Room in Langsam Library.


Movie and Media Appreciation Classes

Electronic Music Production with Ableton Live and Push (3 credits)
FAM 2045-001 (Wednesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, TI Technology & Innovation

This is a course designed around contemporary electronic and pop music production techniques using Ableton Live Software and Ableton Push MIDI controllers.  We will be using existing genres and associated production strategies as a vehicle for learning music production. This is also an exploration of your own creativity and unlocking individual expression through electronic music production. This class is appropriate for musicians of all ability levels and backgrounds and has applications in music education, production, music therapy, and preparatory education. By the end of this course, students will have made a small portfolio of music and will gain familiarity to a wide variety of modern electronic pop music production techniques.


Art of Recording (3 credits)
FAM 1050-001 (Thursday, 4:30-7:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Art of Recording focuses on the basic technical musical understanding needed to engage music at progressively deeper levels of understanding. Starting from simple listening experiences you will soon be able to appreciate what it means to be an “expert listener.” A musician learns the function musical scales; a painter, the knowledge paint and brushes; a writer, the craft of words and sentences. The expert listener integrates specific gateways that can reveal the depths of sound possibilities. This course expresses the Art of Recording from basic sound physics, music and brain functions as they pertain to the technology used in producing the popular music we love over the last five decades.


Digital Audio for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2007-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of digital audio theory and practices through the development of basic digital audio production projects. Course topics include general production principles and theory of operation of digital audio workstations with an emphasis placed on internet radio, podcast, and commercial production processes. The student will be introduced to basic audio production techniques through the corresponding laboratory phase of this course. The student will be required to demonstrate knowledge of the principles of audio production and apply those principles in laboratory exercises.
Prerequisite: To take this course you must: Have taken the following Courses EMDT 1011C min grade D-, or EMED 1005 min grade D- or EMED 1015 min grade D-.


Film and Television Production for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2002-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 10:10-11:30 a.m.)

The medium of digital video has become an increasingly pervasive means of communication in contemporary culture. Digital Video allows students to apply media aesthetic theory, processes and techniques in communicating their ideas to a specified audience via the digital video production process. While taking this course, each student is required to write, produce, shoot and edit several projects using digital video cameras, working in a digital nonlinear editing environment, and delivering their content through a variety of digital distribution channels to a specified audience.


Going to the Movies: 20th Century Classics (3 Credits)
EMED 1075-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Through lectures and screenings of classic films students will explore the evolution of the motion picture as a unique and significant form of expression. The course includes investigation into film style and structure, distribution and consumption. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination.


Integrated Media Production 1 for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 1015-001 (Online)
EMED 1015-002 (Wednesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
EMED 1015-003 (Monday/Wednesday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: TI Technology and Innovation

Media convergence is a vital component of our new media culture. In new media there is a melding of production, design and message with user-experience. Integrated Media Production I is an introductory course — the first of a two-course sequence within the E-Media major at CCM — that provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation in the intersecting worlds of digital media production, content development and new media design. This course is an overview of concepts and processes in convergent media production.


Japanese Pop, Anime & Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime, and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music, and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background, and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.


Media in your Life Non-Majors – Online (3 credits)
EMED 1011-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: TI Technology & Innovation

Did you know that the typical American spends about 11 hours a day consuming media? Think about that for a moment. How long is a typical workday? How many hours a night do you sleep? Could it be, based upon time usage alone, that media consumption is the most important activity in our lives? Whether those comments frighten you or inspire you, the fact remains that the media industry plays an enormously important role in our individual lives, is vital to the success of every major industry, and is foundational to the effective functioning of our representative democracy. Would you like to possess a more sophisticated understanding of the media production process and its artistic and theoretical underpinnings? Wouldn’t you like to know more about the latest digital production tools? Do you think you might want to pursue a media career? If you answered “yes” to any one of these questions, then “The Media in Your Life” is exactly the right course for you.


The Evolution of the Television Comedy (3 credits)
EMED 1050-001 (Wednesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HU Humanities and Literature

Through lectures and screenings of classic scenes and episodes, students will explore the American television comedy as a significant form of storytelling; as a uniquely elastic form of expression and contemporary critique; and as an exceptionally creative and influential art. The course includes investigation into comedy and sitcom style and structure, as well as historical and societal context and impact. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination. This course is focused in the historical and cultural development of television comedies from their pre-TV origins to their contemporary manifestations. Students will develop the strategies for reading media properly while also investigating the historical, literary, cultural and aesthetic contributions of television to 20th- and 21st-century art forms.


Music Appreciation Classes

American Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2006-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives

An online history of music in America c. 1620 to the present. Musical life as we experience it in the USA today is the product of a history that is in many ways unique, but never far from world-wide influences. This course surveys a wide variety of music along with the social, political, and religious movements that have shaped American musical life right up to the present. Examines the contributions of numerous cultural groups, regional developments over four centuries, and the ways music reflects values, aspirations, and problems of the population. Course topics include musical genres, styles, personalities, and trends. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, and videos are all online. No prior experience with music required.


Aural Skills and Music Fundamentals (3 credits)
FAM 1040-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

The appreciation of music is enhanced by a deeper knowledge of musical materials and structures. This course will build on the concepts introduced in Critical Listening (FAM-1055), furthering the understanding of theoretical aspects of music, harmonization, part-writing, and form, as well as improving aural skills and recognition. The skills learned in this course will provide basis for further study and understanding of music of all genres.


CCM Excursions Abroad – Guatemala
FAM 2000-001 (Thursday, 6-6:55 p.m.)
Second Half-Semester + Study Tour May 29-June 7
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This 10-day excursion to Guatemala involves a collaboration with the music program at Universidad del Valle de Guatemala (UVG). During the spring second half-session (March 2-April 25), we will set individual and group goals for the experience, learn about the musical and cultural background of Guatemala, prepare for the logistics of international travel, and virtually meet with students at our partnering institution (UVG). During a ten-day trip to Guatemala (May 29-June 7), we will be based in the scenic highlands campus of UVG in Sololá, overlooking the world-famous, volcano-ringed Lake Atitlán. We will visit local Mayan communities and join students from UVG in a week-long “music camp” which will involve composing and performing music that draws from and blends our respective cultural orientations and musical skill sets. On the final two days of the trip we will trek on a volcano and visit the markets and architectural wonders.


Disney Animated Musicals (3 credits)
FAM 2090-001 (Class: Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:50 p.m.) (Screening: Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course explores the genre of the animated film musical with a special emphasis on its presumed originator, the Walt Disney Studios. We will consider the unique expressive properties of this form, examining the ways in which both song and the animated medium distort, rearrange, and reflect the world for its audiences. As we trace the genre’s history and evolution from the earliest experiments with sound technology to the latest multi-billion-dollar franchises, we will simultaneously track shifting trends in popular song and film. This history will run alongside discussions of Disney’s complex and often problematic roles as a purveyor of American and global entertainment.


Experimental Rock – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2013-001 (Jan. 13-March 1, 2020)
FAM 2013-002 (March 2-April 25, 2020)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, TI Technology & Innovation

This course will provide a detailed overview of the tools, techniques and musical styles which had a tremendous impact on the aesthetic of various genres of Rock Music in the 1960s and 70s, the resonance of which can be observed in many mainstream and non-mainstream musical trends of the last 30 years. It will begin with an examination of multi-tracking tape machines: their development and techniques such as sound on sound, tape-delay and flange, which had become standard practice in studios by the late 1960s. This is followed by a technical overview of electronic instruments, specifically the synthesizer, whose development will be traced from the Theremin. Musical trends such as the 1950s avant-garde and Minimalism will serve as a bridge to examinations of seminal bands such as the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Kraftwerk, Can, Neu:, Brian Eno and the Talking Heads among others; the technical knowledge gained from the initial lectures on tape techniques and electronic instruments will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the music of these artists.


Hamilton: A Musical Theater Revolution (3 credits)
FAM 2075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, has been credited as revolutionary and a game changer in the history of the American musical since its off-Broadway opening in 2015. This course explores the revolutionary aspect of this musical, covering song and plot conventions of musical theater as they appear in musicals from the 1920s to the present and investigating how Miranda employs, challenges, and transforms them in Hamilton. We will also consider Hamilton among other “history musicals,” its relationship with popular music (especially hip-hop and sociopolitical issues of race and ethnicity derived from Miranda’s choice to offer a multi-racial cast to represent the Founding Fathers. We will thus contextualize Hamilton in musical theater history and investigate what aspects of the musical are conventional and which ones are original.


History of Rock & Roll II – Online (3 credits)
FAM 3032-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Rock and Roll had humble beginnings in the Southeastern United States, but over time it developed into a force, beyond mere entertainment, that has defined youth culture on a global scale. Rock and roll culture is embedded in the fabric of youth identity. Rock and roll music is a commodity that young people use daily, often with an obsessive devotion. Marketing campaigns that target youth are so relentless that young people are under enormous media and social pressure to join the ranks of consumers. The goal of History of Rock and Roll is, therefore, threefold: 1. To provide for students a chronological survey that examines the relationship between the music, its most successful and colorful artists, the associated recording technology, and the impact of the genre on American culture. 2. Through critical listening and reading, the course will provide students with useful, evaluative tools so that they can make historically informed and thoughtful decisions.


Japanese Pop, Anime & Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime, and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music, and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background, and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.


Jazz Appreciation (3 credits)
FAM 2051-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

A one-semester overview of America’s true art form: jazz. The course will introduce students to the various styles of jazz, its major performers, its history and origins, and will also involve attending jazz performances at CCM or elsewhere.


Live at CCM (2-3 credits)
FAM 1060-001 (TBA)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Through this course, students will have the opportunity to experience concerts at CCM in a directed environment. Learn about a broad range of music and style through exposure to a wide variety of instrumental ensembles. Attend orchestral, wind ensemble, choral, jazz and contemporary music programs and more with the chance to discuss and write about them through interaction with knowledgeable graduate assistants and the directors of the respective ensembles themselves.


Lyric Songwriting (3 credits)
FAM 3071-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 9:05-10:25 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Writing Lyrics to Music analyzes a variety of song forms to instruct you on key lyrical and melodic components; stressed and unstressed beats, rhyme positions, melodic sections and tone. You’ll work through different musical feels and time signatures, and discover how the natural shapes of the words follow the shape of the melody, ultimately creating a much more expressive composition. This is a “can’t miss” course – it’s bound to take your writing to the next level. It will also make you a more valuable co-writer.


Music Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2005-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

An online course that introduces students to a wide range of music in the Western World, covering several historical periods, including our own time. Examines musical styles, musical terms, composers, and other aspects of the music listening experience. Considers the historical and cultural context of musical activity and the way it has shaped the musical life from medieval Europe up to the present in our own communities. Students will discuss their own experiences with music and have the opportunity to attend a musical performance of their choice, near where they live, for class credit. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, videos and film are all online. No prior experience with music required.


Music of the Beatles (3 credits)
FAM 2061-001 (Online)
FAM 2061-002 (Online)
FAM 2061-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

The Music of the Beatles has made an impact in the whole world both musically and sociologically. The Beatles are considered one of the most influential bands of any era. Their music reflects the cultural and social revolution of the 1960s and serves as a model for understanding all subsequent popular music. This class will chronologically trace the development of the Beatles from their early days through the band’s dissolution. There will be analysis of selected compositions with regard to lyrics, harmony, song structure, instrumentation, and arranging. This class will examine their groundbreaking production techniques, individual writing styles, and the impact of their music on other musicians and social trends.


Music and Politics (3 credits)
FAM 2018-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 11:15 a.m.-12:35 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

This course examines the impact of music on politics during the last 100 years in the contemporary classical realm, as well as folk and popular musical styles. Students will become familiar with prominent politically influenced musicians and composers such as Fela Kuti, Woody Guthrie, Bob Marley, and Frederic Rzewski. Also, this class will cover the impact on music from major political and historical events throughout the century, such as World War II’s influence on jazz, or the life and career of Dmitri Shostakovich under Stalin’s Soviet Union. By studying the biographies and major works of this broad spectrum of musicians, students will be able to outline the diverse characteristics of politically oriented music.


Music of Woodstock (3 credits)
FAM 2070-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

The course thoroughly examines the musical artists and the works they performed at history’s most iconic pop music festival, Woodstock (officially the “Woodstock Music and Art Fair”). As many as half a million people or more, descending on a dairy farm in upstate New York in August of 1969 for “three days of peace and music,” were treated to a wildly diverse lineup of musicians and artists hailing from no less than five different continents. The Woodstock Festival is the perfect prism through which to view the 1960s popular scene, when various streams of musical genres converged to forge a new breed of “pop”; the soundtrack of the counterculture and a young, idealistic generation. How did a music festival, let alone pop music in general, become a catalyst for social, political, and artistic change and upheaval? How was the motley assortment of musicians of various stripes, genres, genders, and ethnicities received by the crowd, temporarily the fourth-largest city in New York? How did this crowd co-exist and survive without virtually any of the realities that plague a similar-sized urban center? These are just a few of the many questions posed in this course as we study and—equally as important—savor and experience the musical performances of the 1969 Woodstock Festival.


Progressive Rock (3 credits)
FAM 2020-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30-2:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course will provide a detailed overview of the Progressive Rock phenomenon of the 1970’s; further study will be made of other relevant hybrid genres of this era such as Jazz/Fusion and Afrobeat. In order to better understand and appreciate these styles students will examine the evolution of Jazz during the 1960’s and its cross pollination with Rock in the later part of the decade. There will also be an emphasis on the technological breakthroughs in musical instruments: electro-acoustic instruments such as the Fender rhodes and synthesizers such as the Moog. Throughout, students will examine samples of music and explore its influence on mainstream and non-mainstream musical trends of the last 30 years.


What’s Hot in Popular Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2062-001
FAM 2062-002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This online course examines current popular music in its trending styles and genres. Students will critique selected songs from the weekly “Billboard” charts and various other media resources, including You Tube and digital download statistics, and consider both the hottest artists as well as promising up-and-comers. Students will develop skills for evaluating artistic intent with respect to lyrics, some basic literary techniques, melody, harmony, rhythm, song form, and psychology, and with a look at cutting edge production techniques. Students will identify and compare unique composing and performing styles of today’s artists and identify links between the music business and societal trends. Weekly activity will include reading, viewing, and listening to examples online and completing assignments on Canopy. No prerequisite. No textbook.


Women in Music (3 credits)
FAM 2025-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11:15 a.m-12:10 p.m.
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DEI Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Women in Music is an historical survey of women’s lives and accomplishments in Western music from the medieval period to the present time. The course includes women of diverse races, classes and cultures, and the historical issues that impacted or limited their work. An examination of women’s roles as composers, performers, and patrons reveals their achievements that have been largely ignored because of their gender. Furthermore, although the cultural and societal values change over time and geographic locations, it is evident that suppression and exploitation are recurring themes with regard to social status, education, economics, politics, religion or racial prejudice.


World Music Lab (0-1 credits)
FAM 3085-001 Indian Raga (Monday/Wednesday, 7:15-8:10 p.m.)
FAM 3085-002 Bluegrass and Old-Time Band (Tuesday, 5-7 p.m.)
FAM 3085-003 Tabla I (Wednesday, 6-7:40 p.m.)
FAM 3085-004 Tabla II (Wednesday, 7:45-9:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Students learn to play music of a given cultural tradition in an ensemble setting using appropriate instruments and/or voice.


Music Performance Classes

Beginning Jazz Improv
FAM 1065-001 (Monday, 1:30-4:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course will provide the student with the fundamentals of Jazz improvisation. It will introduce the student to the language of the jazz improviser, from chord recognition and their related scales, to important compositions and their construction. It will aid the development of aural training skills from harmony to melodic patterns. Emphasis is placed on jazz feel, performance skills and knowledge of scales modes, jazz patterns and phrasing, from 7th chord construction to analysis and performance of the blues. Basic knowledge of scales and chords is expected prior to enrolling.


CCM Excursions Abroad – Guatemala
FAM 2000-001 (Thursday, 6-6:55 p.m.)
Second Half-Semester + Study Tour May 29-June 7
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This 10-day excursion to Guatemala involves a collaboration with the music program at Universidad del Valle de Guatemala (UVG). During the spring second half-session (March 2-April 25), we will set individual and group goals for the experience, learn about the musical and cultural background of Guatemala, prepare for the logistics of international travel, and virtually meet with students at our partnering institution (UVG). During a ten-day trip to Guatemala (May 29-June 7), we will be based in the scenic highlands campus of UVG in Sololá, overlooking the world-famous, volcano-ringed Lake Atitlán. We will visit local Mayan communities and join students from UVG in a week-long “music camp” which will involve composing and performing music that draws from and blends our respective cultural orientations and musical skill sets. On the final two days of the trip we will trek on a volcano and visit the markets and architectural wonders


Classical Guitar Class (2 credits)
GTAR 5175-001 (Undergraduate)
GTAR 6075-001 (Graduate)
All Sections: Tuesday/Thursday, 12:20-1:15 p.m.
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Applied course in basic guitar skills. Emphasis on playing classical and folk styles. Review of current published methods and materials. Open to non-CCM students. Course repeats each semester. Students provide their own nylon string guitars.


Electronic Music Production with Ableton Live and Push (3 credits)
FAM 2045-001 (Wednesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, TI Technology & Innovation

This is a course designed around contemporary electronic and pop music production techniques using Ableton Live Software and Ableton Push MIDI controllers.  We will be using existing genres and associated production strategies as a vehicle for learning music production. This is also an exploration of your own creativity and unlocking individual expression through electronic music production. This class is appropriate for musicians of all ability levels and backgrounds and has applications in music education, production, music therapy, and preparatory education. By the end of this course, students will have made a small portfolio of music and will gain familiarity to a wide variety of modern electronic pop music production techniques.


Group Music Instrument Lessons: Violin, Saxophone, Trumpet and Clarinet
FAM 1080 (Class Days and Times TBA)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, FA Fine Arts

This course provides an opportunity for non-music majors to receive lessons on their instrument in a small group setting (up to 6 students per instrument group). Students will study fundamentals of sound production, develop their technique, enhance their pedagogical and critical listening skills, and expand their repertoire. Students will prepare etudes and appropriate works, perform them in class, and receive feedback from their peers. Students are expected to practice outside of class. Students are expected to have some fluency on their instrument prior to enrolling in this course. Students must supply their own instrument and bring it to class. No instruments will be provided, although exceptions may be made for certain percussion instruments. Group lessons are offered for each instrument based on instructor availability.


Group Piano for Non-music Majors (3 credits)
PIAN 1001-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:05-10 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-004 (Tuesday/Thursday, 1:25-2:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Designed for those with little or no piano experience; teaches the fundamentals of reading music, playing by ear, using chord charts, and improving finger flexibility.


Group Piano for Non-Majors II (3 credits)
PIAN 1002-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 1:25-2:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This is a continuation of Group Piano for Non-music Majors I. Students learn the basics of piano playing and chord playing, as well as basic music theory. Technical skills are taught.


Jammin’ with Laptops (3 credits)
FAM 2014-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course will explore the potentials of laptop computers for music making. Various technical topics, including analog v. digital sound, audio software, effects, gear, MIDI and audio programming languages will be surveyed. In addition, a survey of the history of computer music will be conducted by way of an investigation into seminal readings and recordings. Both of these inquiries will provide participants with the technical and analytical skills to utilize their laptops to creative ends. Participants will also be expected to work in small groups on creative projects.


Jammin’ with Laptops – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

In this course, you will play, record, and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session; Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2), and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3 In the Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments, and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the Midterm Exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In the Unit 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In the Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1~2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In the Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2~4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the Final Exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.


Piano Elective for Undergraduates (1-2 credits)
PIAN 5030-001 (TBA)

Piano lessons for students who want to study as an elective. By permission only.


Piano Elective for Graduate Students (1-2 credits)
PIAN 8030-001 (TBA)

Applied weekly lessons. Content (repertoire and technical exercises) determined by professor based on the specific needs of each student.


Pop Piano for Non-Majors (3 credits)
PIAN 1003-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11:15 a.m.-12:10 p.m.)
PIAN 1003-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Students will learn how to play piano parts of popular idiom piano pieces. They will learn how to realize chord “lead” sheets and also listen to music to pick up piano accompaniment styles. Learning to read music is not part of this course, although you will learn to read rhythm charts. Music will be chosen from artists such as Coldplay, Rihanna, Bruno Mars, as well as earlier works by Chicago, Motley Crue and John Lennon. Choices will be made depending on the type of accompaniment style you are learning.


UC Guitar Orchestra (2 credits)
FAM 1075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Area: FA Fine Arts

The UC Guitar Orchestra provides players of any type of guitar (steel or nylon string acoustic; electric) with the opportunity to come together as community to rehearse and perform in a large ensemble format. We will explore a diverse range of repertoire including classical, folk, pop and non-Western genres. Participation in the orchestra is open to all guitarists who own their own guitar, have basic technical proficiency and the ability to read either standard musical notation or tablature. The semester will culminate in a public performance.


World Music Lab (0-1 credits)
FAM 3085-001 Indian Raga (Monday/Wednesday, 7:15-8:10 p.m.)
FAM 3085-002 Bluegrass and Old-Time Band (Tuesday, 5-7 p.m.)
FAM 3085-003 Tabla I (Wednesday, 6-7:40 p.m.)
FAM 3085-004 Tabla II (Wednesday, 7:45-9:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Students learn to play music of a given cultural tradition in an ensemble setting using appropriate instruments and/or voice.


 Theatre Appreciation Classes

Acting for Non-Majors (3 credits)
FAM 1001-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 1-2:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-002 (Monday/Wednesday, 6-7:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-003 (Monday/Wednesday, 4-5:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-004 (Monday/Wednesday, 2:30-3:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

An introductory course in the craft of acting designed for University students interested in theatre performance. Students will work on unscripted material in group improvisations and scripted material in the presentation of monologues or scenes. Basic actor vocabulary common to all styles of performance will be taught.


Hamilton: A Musical Theater Revolution (3 credits)
FAM 2075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SCE Society, Culture, and Ethics

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, has been credited as revolutionary and a game changer in the history of the American musical since its off-Broadway opening in 2015. This course explores the revolutionary aspect of this musical, covering song and plot conventions of musical theater as they appear in musicals from the 1920s to the present and investigating how Miranda employs, challenges, and transforms them in Hamilton. We will also consider Hamilton among other “history musicals,” its relationship with popular music (especially hip-hop and socio-political issues of race and ethnicity derived from Miranda’s choice to offer a multi-racial cast to represent the Founding Fathers. We will thus contextualize Hamilton in musical theater history and investigate what aspects of the musical are conventional and which ones are original.


Introduction to Stage Lighting & Sound (3 credits)
THPR 1020C-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

In this course, the student will learn hands on skills with lighting and sound equipment, while discovering the ways in which modern technology can be effectively applied as a key production element in drama, musical theatre, opera and dance. Through experiences both practical and theoretical, each student will gain operational skills, and recognize the importance of teamwork and collaboration in creating art and discovering a personal aesthetic.


Stage Lighting Lab & Crew for Non-Majors (1-2 credits)
THPR 1018C-001 (Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Practical production undergraduate crew work in the execution of stage lighting designs for major opera, musical theatre, dance and dramatic productions. Each student will practice their understanding in accomplishing the execution of a realized lighting design project(s). Non-typical work session hours required (evening and weekends) for installation and running crews for productions. May be repeated for credit.


Theatre History for Non-Majors (3 credits)
DRPF 2055-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11:15-12:10 p.m.)
DRPF 2055-002 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives

History of Theatre is a chronological look at the rise of Western theatre from ancient times to the Renaissance. The course examines how theatre emerges, its dramatic structure, styles of acting, various visual elements and different production techniques. The course also explores how theatre artisans built upon the experiences of one another, introduces key figures from theatre history and shows how theatre continues to influence us today.


Voice Class (1-2 credits)
VOIC 1075/7075-001 (Thursday, 2-2:55 p.m.)
VOIC 1075/7075-002 (Tuesday, 4-4:55 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

Voice Class is intended to impart the rudiments of classical vocal technique. Topics addressed include breathing for singing, phonation, anatomy of the breathing process, anatomy of the larynx, posture, vowel formation, and characteristics of consonant sounds. The class will culminate in the student performing a song in English.


Registration Information

Find the most up-to-date class information and register at catalyst.uc.edu. For more information on the registration process, please visit uc.edu/registrar/registration.

*The course information posted above is accurate as of Oct. 11, 2019. Consult the UC course offerings available at catalyst.uc.edu for possible schedule changes.

CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Alum and Renowned Tenor Stuart Skelton to Lead Master Class

From Sydney to Cincy: Stuart Skelton (MM Voice, ’95) brings skills and experience from his 25-year career to the CCM master classroom on Monday, Oct. 14 and Tuesday, Oct. 15.

There was a warmth to Stuart Skelton’s voice as he laughed about the sheer luck that landed him across the globe in Cincinnati, Ohio, from Sydney, Australia. “I definitely didn’t think this would be my path,” he says. Now a Grammy-nominated tenor and the 2014 International Opera Awards Male Singer of the Year, Skelton is critically acclaimed for his outstanding musicianship, tonal beauty and intensely dramatic portrayals. And he couldn’t imagine it any other way.

Skelton began performing at the age of 7, when he started singing at St. Andrew’s Cathedral School in Sydney, Australia. Yet it was only after completing his undergraduate work in economics and law at the University of Sydney that he feels his passion for singing was given the chance of a lifetime. He was awarded a scholarship to travel overseas to pursue various vocal auditions, and Cincinnati made the list. “In a sense I was doing something totally unheard of,” he recalls. “Most vocal performers head to London from Australia as opposed to the U.S.”

After seeing countless programs across the states, the level of dedication among the CCM faculty, as well as the state-of-the-art facilities, tipped the scales. “That was it — my opportunity to give singing professionally a shot, which I had never given any thought to actually doing for a living.” And lucky for us (and our ears), it has worked out. Skelton has appeared in many of the world’s most celebrated opera houses, singing with such companies as the Metropolitan Opera, Seattle Opera, English National Opera and Paris Opera.

Finding Home in The Queen City

Skelton recalls being intensely focused on what needed to be done during his graduate studies at CCM. He says it’s that type of focus and self-awareness that allows one to intentionally hone in on their craft. He was able to share this sentiment with students during CCM’s Sesquicentennial Celebrations, and will do so again next week during a multi-part master class — opportunities he calls “an absolute joy.”

“Master classes are a two-way bridge of trust between the teacher and student,” he says. “When you put yourself out there as a performer in front of the audience, the students gain a certain level of trust in you once you start working with them.”

Skelton says one of his happiest moments professionally has been returning to CCM to work with students and witness the next generation of performers. His advice? Apply the parts of every life experience you can use to your advantage and don’t bother with rest. “You’ll spend much more time and enthusiasm embracing the things that are helpful and instructive.”

And with a full performance schedule until 2023 spanning all over the world, Skelton’s 25-year career shows no signs of slowing down. No matter where he goes, he says it’s important to create small pockets of home; it makes you feel less alone in a city you don’t otherwise know well. He’s quick to point out that CCM will always be a small corner of home … And we’re sure glad he’s not a stranger.

Skelton will be giving master classes on Monday, Oct. 14, and Tuesday, Oct. 15 at CCM’s Robert J. Werner Recital Hall. These are free and open to the public and will last approximately 2 hours.

Master Class Details

4 p.m., Monday, Oct. 14
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Directions and Parking

CCM is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions for detailed driving directions to CCM Village.

Parking is available in UC’s CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors.


Story by Jamie Muenzer, Associate Director of Alumni Relations

CCM News

CCM Welcomes World-Renowned Violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter for Master Class on Sept. 27

CCM students and the general public are invited to attend a free master class with acclaimed violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter on Friday, Sept. 27.

Four-time Grammy Award-winner Anne-Sophie Mutter presents a master class at 6 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 27, 2019 in CCM’s Mary Emery Hall Room 3250. The “undisputed queen of violin-playing” (The Times, London), Mutter will work with CCM string students during the two-hour session, which is free and open to the general public.

Mutter’s visit to CCM coincides with her weekend performances with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, which features her on Beethoven’s Violin Concerto to celebrate the composer’s 250th birthday. The CSO concerts are presented on Saturday, Sept. 28 and Sunday, Sept. 29 at Music Hall. For more information about the events with the CSO, please visit cincinnatisymphony.org.

Please contact Associate Professor of Violin, Won-Bin Yim for more information on the master class at CCM.

About Anne-Sophie Mutter
Anne-Sophie Mutter is a musical phenomenon: for more than 40 years the virtuoso has now been a fixture in all the world’s major concert halls, making her mark on the classical music scene as a soloist, mentor and visionary.

The four-time Grammy Award winner is equally committed to the performance of traditional composers as to the future of music: so far she has given world premieres of 27 works – Unsuk Chin, Sebastian Currier, Henri Dutilleux, Sofia Gubaidulina, Witold Lutoslawski, Norbert Moret, Krzysztof Penderecki, Sir André Previn, Wolfgang Rihm and John Williams have all composed for Anne-Sophie Mutter. Furthermore, she dedicates herself to numerous benefit projects and to supporting tomorrow’s musical elite: in the autumn of 1997 she founded the “Association of Friends of the Anne-Sophie Mutter Foundation e.V.”, to which the Anne-Sophie Mutter Foundation was added in 2008. These two charitable institutions provide support for the scholarship recipients, support which is tailored to the fellows’ individual needs. Since 2011, Anne-Sophie Mutter has regularly shared the spotlight on stage with her ensemble of fellows, “Mutter’s Virtuosi”. 

Anne-Sophie Mutter’s 2019 concert calendar features performances in Asia, Europe, North and South America, once again reflecting the violinist’s musical versatility and her unparalleled prominence in the world of classical music: in March she has performed the world premiere of Sebastian Currier’s Ghost Trio at Carnegie Hall. In San Francisco, she will give the world premiere of Jörg Widmann’s String Quartet – both works were commissioned by her and are dedicated to the violinist. In September she will perform for the first time in her career as part of an open-air concert. Entitled Across the Stars, this event features some of the most outstanding works by John Williams, who has won several Oscars for his compositions, and takes place on Munich’s Königsplatz. Most of the works on this open-air programme are special arrangements made for Mutter. August sees the release of her CD recording of this new Williams repertoire, which has not been heard in this form anywhere else so far. Another thematic focus in 2019 are the violin concerti by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, which she performs throughout Europe and in the USA. In South America and in Europe, she appears with the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra and plays the Beethoven Triple Concerto with Daniel Barenboim and Yo-Yo Ma – an extraordinary cast. Together with “Mutter’s Virtuosi”, the ensemble of the Anne-Sophie Mutter Foundation, she performs for the first time in South America.

On October 16 2019 Anne-Sophie Mutter will be honoured with the Praemium Imperiale in the category music; in June she received the Polar Music Prize. Poland awarded the Gloria Artis Gold Medal for Cultural Achievements to Anne-Sophie Mutter in March 2018, making her the first German artist to receive such an honour. In February 2018 she was named an Honorary Member of the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia. Romania awarded the Order of Cultural Merit in the rank of a Grand Officer to Anne-Sophie Mutter in November 2017; during the same month France honoured her by presenting her with the insignia of a Commander of the French Order of the Arts and Literature. In December 2016, the Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports awarded her the “Medalla de oro al Mérito en las Bellas Artes” (Gold Medal for Merits in the Fine Arts). In January 2015 Anne-Sophie Mutter was named an Honorary Fellow of Keble College at the University of Oxford. In October 2013 she became a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, after winning the medal of the Lutoslawski Society (Warsaw) in January. In 2012 the Atlantic Council bestowed the Distinguished Artistic Leadership Award upon her. In 2011 she received the Brahms Prize as well as the Erich Fromm Prize and the Gustav Adolf Prize for her social activism. In 2010 the Technical-Scientific University of Norway in Trondheim bestowed an honorary doctorate upon her; in 2009 she won the European St. Ulrich Award as well as the Cristobal Gabarron Award. In 2008 Anne-Sophie Mutter was the recipient of the International Ernst von Siemens Music Prize as well as the Leipzig Mendelssohn Prize. The violinist has been awarded the German Grand Order of Merit, the French Medal of the Legion of Honour, the Bavarian Order of Merit, the Decoration of Honour for Services to the Republic of Austria, and numerous other honors.

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Directions and Parking

CCM is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions for detailed driving directions to CCM Village.Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the end of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit the UC Parking Services website for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors.

Student Salutes