CCM Announces 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition Winners

Artist Diploma candidate Yi Li with Mark Gibson and the CCM Philharmonia.

Six students won awards in CCM’s 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition, which was held on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Corbett Auditorium.

Since its inauguration in 1976, the annual competition welcomes current and incoming CCM voice students to compete for scholarships and cash prizes, and a panel of judges composed of opera industry professionals selects each year’s class of prizewinners.

The 2019 CCM Opera Scholarship Competition winners are:

Victor Cardamone, first-year Master of Music student
From Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Studying at CCM with Tom Baresel
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Corbett Award ($15,000)
The Corbett Award is supported by the Corbett Foundation in cooperation with CCM.

Carlos Cardenas, first-year Artist Diploma student
From Bogota, Columbia; Studying at CCM with Daniel Weeks
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Italo Tajo Memorial Award ($15,000)
This award is supported by the Italo Tajo Memorial Scholarship Fund (established by Mr. Tajo’s wife Inelda Tajo) in cooperation with CCM.

Samuel Kid, incoming Master of Music student from the University of Michigan
From Ann Arbor, Michigan
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Andrew White Memorial Award ($12,500)
This award is supported by the Andrew White Memorial Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Teresa Perrotta, second-year Master of Music student
From Orlando, Florida; Studying at CCM with Gwen Detwiler
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Seybold-Russell Award ($10,000)
This award is supported by the Seybold-Russell Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Amanda Olea, second-year Master of Music student
From Mexico City, Mexico; Studying at CCM with Gwen Detwiler
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the John Alexander Memorial Award ($10,000)
This award is supported by the John Alexander Memorial Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Maria Miller, first-year Master of Music student
From Paducah, Kentucky; Studying at CCM with Amy Johnson
Prize: Norman Treigle Award ($3000)
This award is supported by the Norman Treigle Opera Scholarship Competition Award Fund in cooperation with CCM.

The judges panel for CCM’s 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition included:

  • Thomas Bankston, Artistic Director of Dayton Opera
  • Lawrence Edelson, Founder and Producing Artistic Director of American Lyric Theater in New York, where he oversees the Composer Librettist Development Program.
  • Neal Goren, Founder and Artistic Director of Catapult Opera, a new touring company premiering in fall 2020 with a new Robert Wilson production of Menotti’s Amahl and the Night Visitors.

About CCM Opera
The Department of Opera at CCM boasts one of the most comprehensive training programs for opera singers, coaches and directors in the United States. Students at CCM work with some of the most renowned teachers and artists active in opera today.

CCM students and alumni frequently advance to the final rounds of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. In 2017, four CCM alumni competed in the semi-finals: Jessica Faselt, soprano (MM Voice, 2016); Summer Hassan, soprano (MM Voice, 2014); Andrew Manea, baritone (MM Voice, 2016); and Cody Quattlebaum, bass-baritone (BM Voice, 2015) — who was chosen as a finalist in the national competition. In 2018, former CCM Artist Diploma in Opera Performance student Brandon Scott Russell (MM Voice, 2018; AD Vocal Performance, 2018) took first place at the Met’s National Council Auditions Southeast Regional Competition and went on to compete in the semi-final round. This year, three CCM alumni and students will advance to the Met’s National Council Semi-Finals: Joshua Wheeker, tenor (CCM Voice 2007-2012); Murrella Parton (MM Voice, 2017); and Elena Villalón, soprano, currently studying at CCM with William McGraw. The semi-finals take place in New York on March 24, 2019. Learn more at metopera.org/about/auditions/national-council-auditions/.

In addition, CCM’s Mainstage Opera and Studio Opera Series have received some of the National Opera Association Production Competition’s highest honors throughout the years, taking home six of the 18 non-professional prizes awarded in 2010 and four prizes in 2011.

CCM Opera graduates have performed on the stages of the world’s greatest opera companies, including Cincinnati Opera, Metropolitan Opera (New York), Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Royal Opera (London), La Scala (Italy) and more.

CCM’s 2018-19 Mainstage Opera season concludes with W.A. Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito (The Clemency of Titus), conducted by Jiannan Cheng with stage direction by Robin Guarino. The opera runs April 12-14, 2019 at CCM’s Corbett Auditorium. Learn more about the production at uc.edu/news/articles/2018/09/n201495.html

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"The Hunchback of Notre Dame" runs March 8-10, 2019 at CCM's Corbett Auditorium.

CCM Slideshows: ‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame’

Come one, come all! CCM is getting “topsy turvy” in its Mainstage production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, which continues tonight, March 8, and runs through Sunday, March 10, 2019, in Corbett Auditorium.

View the slideshow below for your sneak peek at CCM’s lush retelling of the musical. Based on the Victor Hugo novel and songs from the Disney animated feature, The Hunchback of Notre Dame features the film’s Academy Award-nominated score, as well as new songs by Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz. Peter Parnell’s book features verbatim passages from Hugo’s gothic novel. Parental discretion is advised.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Don’t miss your opportunity to see CCM’s stars in the college’s epic production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame on March 8-10, 2019. Tickets on sale now through the CCM Box Office.

CCM’s production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame will last 2 hours and 45 minutes, including a 15-minute intermission.

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THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME
Music by Alan Menken
Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz
Book by Peter Parnell
Based on the Victor Hugo novel and songs from the Disney film
Originally developed by Disney Theatrical Productions

Creative Team

  • Aubrey Berg, director
  • Stephen Goers, musical director
  • Katie Johannigman, choreographer
  • Erin Magner*, production stage manager
  • Dean Mogle, costume designer
  • Oliver Tidwell-Littleton*, lighting designer
  • Matthew Tibbs, sound designer
  • Aria Braswell*, assistant director
  • Kelly Yurko, hair and make-up designer
  • Lindsey Purvis*, scenic designer
  • Hankyu Lee*, associate sound designer
  • Jenny Jones, fight choreographer

* CCM Student

Cast List

  • Andrew Alstat asLieutenant Frederic Charlus
  • Bryce Baxter as Claude Frollo
  • Jack Brewer as Father Dupin
  • Kevin Chlapecka as Clopin Trouillefou
  • Matt Copley as Jehan Frollo
  • Dylan Dougal as Saint Aphrodisius
  • Madison Hagler as King Louis Xi
  • Kendall McCarthy as Florika
  • Jenny Mollet as Esmeralda
  • Sam Pickart as Tribunal
  • Alex Stone as Quasimodo
  • Frankie Thams as Captain Phoebus de Martin
  • Madelaine Vandenberg as Madam
  • Jordan Alexander, Michael Canu, Madison Deadman, Sofie Flores, Kylie Goldstein, Zoe Grolnick, Chip Hawver, Joshua Johnson, Camila Paquet, Bryn Purvis, Mikayla Renfrow, Aaron Richert, Hank Von Kolnitz, Ethan Zeph as Multiple Roles
  • Leo Carmody, Samuel Cohen, Britta Cowan, Christian Feliciano, Carina Florio, Ashton Francis, Colton Harksen, Kai Horvit, Jack Johnson, Christian Kidd, Anna Chase Lanier, Tyler J. Martin, Cassandra Lyn Maurer, Drew Minard, Chesney Mitchell, Stone Mountain, Eli Owens, Ben Pimental, Brandon Schumacker, Matthew Skrovan, Eleanor Zambarano as The Voices of Notre Dame
  • Dance Captains: Joshua Johnson, Bryn Purvis
  • Vocal Warm-Ups: Ben Pimental

Understudies:

  • Quasimodo – Aaron Richert
  • Esmeralda – Camila Paquet
  • Male Cover – Ben Pimental
  • Swings – Tori Heinlein, Sammy Schechter

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Thursday, March 7
  • 8 p.m. Friday, March 8
  • 2 p.m. Saturday, March 9
  • 8 p.m. Saturday, March 9
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, March 10

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Ticket prices start at $32. Discounts are available for UC and non-UC students. Service changes may apply for online orders.

Student rush tickets will be available one hour before each performance to non-UC students, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid Bearcat ID, based on availability.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online through CCM’s e-Box Office.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____________________

Mainstage Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Musical Theatre Production Sponsor: Dr. & Mrs. Carl G. Fischer

Musical Theatre Performance Sponsor: Graeter’s Ice Cream

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI, 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Tel: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

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Header image for LINKS program.

CCM Holds Lonely Instruments for Needy Kids (LINKS) Collection Drive This Weekend

Do you have a musical instrument collecting dust? Your gift could provide the missing link for a promising young musician! Through the Lonely Instruments for Needy Kids (LINKS) program at CCM, you can donate your used instrument to a promising young musician who cannot afford to rent or purchase their own.

CCM holds its annual LINKS Collection Days this Saturday, March 9, and Sunday, March 10, 2019, at the Joseph-Beth Booksellers in the Rookwood Pavilion. The hours for the collection drive are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday and noon-5 p.m. on Sunday.

A project of CCMpower in partnership with Buddy Roger’s Music, Joseph-Beth Booksellers and WGUC 90.9 FM, LINKS began in 1993 as the brainchild of CCM alumnus Bill Harvey (BM Music Education, 1971). The Vice President of Buddy Roger’s Music, Harvey wanted to fill the need for students whose parents were unable to buy, rent or borrow an instrument. The solution was somewhat simple: a “recycling program” for musical instruments.

LINKS accepts donations of new and used instruments from the Greater Cincinnati community, then places them with students in local elementary, middle and high school bands and orchestras, as well as with students in CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement programs. Students are qualified by the recommendation of their music teacher, and a LINKS scholarship application is submitted in the student’s name.

Since its inception, LINKS has placed over 3,000 instruments into the hands of children. Even if the instrument is not in perfect condition, donations are gladly accepted. Buddy Roger’s Music generously contributes the time to carefully clean, restore and tune each instrument.

Entertainment during the collection will be provided by local music students of all ages.

If you do not have an instrument, you can still assist young musicians who need a helping hand by making a contribution to the LINKS fund at ccm.weshareonline.org/LINKS.

In addition to the March 9 and 10 collection days, instruments are accepted year-round at Buddy Roger’s Music. Call 513-729-1950 for information on store hours and locations.

For more information on LINKS or to make a monetary donation, call the CCM External Relations Office at 513-556-2100.

____________________

Story by CCM Graduate Student Jonathan Dellinger

 

CCM News Student Salutes
Littleton was the assistant lighting designer for the New Year's Eve Celebration at Epcot in Walt Disney World.

Designing Disney: Inside Look at CCM Student’s Internship at Walt Disney World

Graduate Lighting Design student Oliver Littleton is in his final year at CCM, and is already working full-time as a paid professional intern at Walt Disney World in Orlando. The MFA student is finishing up his school work from Florida in order to graduate on time this May.

Littleton works as a show lighting design intern with Disney Imagineering, but is also working on a CCM project in Cincinnati that was originally developed by Disney Theatrical Productions. He is the lighting designer for CCM’s upcoming Mainstage Series production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, which runs Thursday, March 7-Sunday, March 10, 2019, at CCM’s Corbett Auditorium.

Now, this is not exactly like the animated film musical that patrons may remember from the late ‘90s. The stage musical is based on Victor Hugo’s gothic novel and songs from Disney’s animated feature. It showcases music and lyrics by Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz, including some new songs that weren’t heard in the film version.

“The stage musical hews closer to the original novel by Victor Hugo and, despite the endearing gargoyles, is designed for adult audiences who will see it as a cautionary tale for our times,” says CCM Musical Theatre Chair Aubrey Berg, director of CCM’s production. Parental discretion is advised.

Littleton was the assistant lighting designer for the New Year's Eve Celebration at Epcot in Walt Disney World.

Littleton was the assistant lighting designer for the New Year’s Eve Celebration at Epcot in Walt Disney World.

Disney’s professional internships are designed to connect students and recent graduates with paid professional opportunities and as the company evaluates them for future employment. Littleton began his internship with Disney over the summer, and plans to continue his work for the company for the foreseeable future.

“I want to continue growing my skills in the entertainment and architectural fields,” Littleton says. “I hope to continue designing for theatre and the opera as well, for both enjoyment and experience. However, I think my long term plans lie in architectural entertainment applications for lighting design.”

Between balancing school work and his work as a Disney Imagineer, Littleton found time to catch up with us to share some behind-the-scenes details about CCM’s production of “Hunchback” and his experience in Disney’s professional internship program.

What does your work at Disney entail? How did you come to this opportunity?
In the spring of 2018, I applied for a Lighting Design Professional Internship with Disney Parks Live Entertainment in Walt Disney World, Florida.  Disney Parks Live Entertainment is the group who design and plan all of the live entertainment aspects of Disney’s parks and resorts around the world. That includes stage shows, parades, live celebrations, events and nighttime spectaculars.  I was chosen as the Lighting Design Professional Intern for the summer and fall cycles, and held that position from June until the end of 2018. I worked as an assistant designer, associate designer, draftsmen and lighting consultant for dozens of projects both current and upcoming. Some of the completed projects that I worked on include Mickey’s Not So Scary Halloween Party, Mickey’s Very Merry Christmas Party, DVC Moonlight Magic Events and The Wonderful World of Disney: Magical Holiday Celebration Live on ABC.

As the end of my professional internship with entertainment neared, I was offered a position working as a Show Lighting Design Professional Intern with Disney Imagineering. Walt Disney Imagineering is the creative force behind Walt Disney Parks and Resorts that dreams up, designs and builds all Disney theme parks, resorts, attractions, cruise ships, real estate developments and regional entertainment venues worldwide. As a part of the show lighting design team I work to evaluate and assess the existing lighting design in all of our venues and help to maintain the original intent as well as improve the quality of the lighting.  I will be in this position until June, at which time I hope to be offered a full-time position in the same group doing similar work.

Littleton was the assistant lighting designer for the New Year’s Eve Celebration at Epcot in Walt Disney World. Photo provided.

How have you been able to balance your work at Disney and your studies at CCM?
A combination of great understanding by my professors and not much sleep! Last semester I was officially on co-op for 9 of my credit hours, so that was a bit easier than this one has been. I have been working on “Hunchback” with Aubrey Berg and my assistants since last September, and that was pretty easy to balance by putting in a few hours a week in the evenings to communicate with the team via email. After I was offered the opportunity to stay at Disney, I communicated extensively with my advisors about what was best for my education along with, obviously, my future career.  We worked out how many days I would be in Cincinnati during the semester for the show and how I could fulfill some of my class requirements online from Florida. I continued communicating with the director and design team from afar. Frankly it’s just been plenty of long nights and busy weekend days as its been both my full-time job with Disney and another 20 to 30 hours a week of doing things for my MFA.

It has been awesome of my professors to work with me and help me take this amazing opportunity while staying on track to get my degree in May as planned.

What sort of special effects have you incorporated into your lighting design for CCM’s production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame?
The show presents us with lots of unique challenges. We need to quickly tell complex moments of the story and show the various scenic changes as characters travel from location to location. We use some great physical tricks to achieve this in the set with props and lighting — but I don’t want to give anything away for people who will come see the show. The big two challenges on this show have been lighting a huge and architectural set, as well as treating five different backdrops for the show. I’ve used a lot of the same techniques and approaches in “Hunchback” that I have previously taken in lighting buildings and event structures, as well as approaches I’ve used in more traditional theatre settings. I think a lot of people who come and see the show will experience a set that feels just a bit different than what they are used to seeing onstage.

A set rendering for CCM’s production of “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” by student scenic designer Lindsey Purvis.

Hunchback” feels epic, dynamic and very real, where so many sets can come off as thin, flimsy and flat. I think the other thing to appreciate is how we use light and subtle changes of the set to quickly move through time and place. I think the audience will be able to quickly understand where we are just from a backdrop or a color movement and hopefully they are impressed by how many looks and feelings we draw out of the space.

What has been your favorite lighting design experience at CCM? What about outside of CCM?
At CCM, I designed the 2017-18 Mainstage production of Candide in Patricia Corbett Theatre. I had both a really great experience and, I think, a pretty cool and unique outcome. We worked hard to create a very unique and bold approach to the tricky piece. A huge part of the storytelling fell to my lighting design and it was a blast to take on that responsibility with such a fun show. Outside of CCM my work at Disney has been really exciting, obviously, and I think that’s been my favorite experience in a long time.

Has there been a specific class or instructor who particularly impacted your learning experience at CCM? How so?
Mark Williams and his Moving Light Programming class my first year at CCM was both an incredible challenge and an essential learning experience for me. The course was about learning to use moving light consoles to program intelligent fixtures in high pressure environments. The course taught me about my own design process as well as ways to use technology to help create stories that otherwise couldn’t exist. The training from Mark’s course is something I use all the time in my work now.

Do you have anything else to add about your experience working on CCM’s production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame?
It has been great to work on my first musical at CCM and an exciting change of pace. It’s a unique and powerful addition to our season and a wonderful conclusion to my time earning a masters. I hope everyone who is able to see our production appreciates the piece as a modern and important show; watching rehearsals and being a part of the process has given me a real appreciation for the music and elegant storytelling that comes from both Hugo’s novel and Disney’s animated take on the story. It has been a process that I will remember and continue learning from for a long time.

CCM’s epic production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame opens on Thursday, March 7 and continues through Sunday, March 10, 2019. Tickets are on sale now through the CCM Box Office.

____________________ 

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME
Music by Alan Menken
Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz
Book by Peter Parnell
Based on the Victor Hugo novel and songs from the Disney film
Originally developed by Disney Theatrical Productions

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Thursday, March 7
  • 8 p.m. Friday, March 8
  • 2 p.m. Saturday, March 9
  • 8 p.m. Saturday, March 9
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, March 10

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Ticket prices start at $32. Discounts are available for UC and non-UC students. Service charges may apply for online orders.

Single tickets are on sale now! Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online through our e-Box Office!

Visit ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice for CCM Box Office hours and location.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____________________

Mainstage Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Musical Theatre Production Sponsor: Dr. & Mrs. Carl G. Fischer

Musical Theatre Performance Sponsor: Graeter’s Ice Cream

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI, 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Tel: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Summer 2019 Electives Bring Arts Experiences to All

Complete your elective requirements while learning about the cinematic arts, rock ‘n’ roll or filmmaking at CCM this summer.

CCM offers general studies and fine arts elective courses during six different sessions in summer 2019. These credit-granting courses cover a wide range of topics and are open to UC and non-UC students alike.

Turn your laptop into a musical instrument and play with a virtual band or learn how to play piano in music performance classes. Film a digital video and learn about the technical elements of filmmaking in electronic media classes.

Study the music of The Beatles and Pink Floyd, examine the trending styles of today’s popular music or learn about the evolution of Japanese Pop, anime and video game music in music appreciation classes. Students can also binge watch Disney’s animated musicals and learn about the cinematic arts in media appreciation classes.

CCM summer 2019 arts elective classes are offered online or in person. View a complete list of class offerings below or at ccm.uc.edu/summerarts.

Full Session: May 13-August 10

Group Piano for Non-Music Majors (3 credits)
PIAN 1001-001
(Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, FA Fine Arts

Designed for those with little or no piano experience; teaches the fundamentals of reading music, playing by ear, using chord charts and improving finger flexibility.
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Music of The Beatles – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2061-001 & 002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration, FA Fine Arts, SE Social & Ethical Issues, Mid-Collegiate Experience

The music of the Beatles has made an impact in the whole world both musically and sociologically. The Beatles are considered one of the most influential bands of any era. Their music reflects the cultural and social revolution of the 1960s and serves as a model for understanding all subsequent popular music. This class will chronologically trace the development of the Beatles from their early days through the band’s dissolution. There will be analysis of selected compositions with regard to lyrics, harmony, song structure, instrumentation and arranging. This class will examine their groundbreaking production techniques, individual writing styles and the impact of their music on other musicians and social trends.
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May-Mester (Session M): May 13-June 2

Jammin with Laptops – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration, FA Fine Arts

In this course, you will play, record and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session: Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2) and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3). In Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the midterm exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In Unit 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1-2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2-4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the final exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.
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Jazz Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2051-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, DC Diversity & Culture, FA Fine Arts

A one-semester overview of America’s true art form: jazz. The course will introduce students to the various styles of jazz, its major performers, its history and origins, and will also involve attending jazz performances at CCM or elsewhere.
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Lighting (3 credits)
EMED 3005-001
(Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday/Friday, 2-4:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CR Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

Lighting is the art of casting shadows to by which a two-dimensional medium creates the illusion of depth and three-dimensionality with images that generate interesting film and video spaces with mood and significance. This course will explore the various theoretical, technical and aesthetic aspects involved in lighting for digital video production. Through demonstrations and hands-on applications in the field and studio, students begin to understand the unlimited potential for lighting in film, electronic cinema and digital television.
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New Media I (3 credits)
EMED 2010-001
(Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday/Friday, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

This course focuses on the implementation of core technologies, such as blogs, social media feeds and web-based applications, into online properties. With prior experience designing graphical user interfaces and building convergent media websites in foundational courses, students in New Media Studio 1 work hands-on to integrate front- and back-end technologies, while gaining an understanding of open-source production environments and web coding beyond HTML and CSS. Additional topics include data transfer from Web interfaces to remote servers, data capture and storage, digital analytics, content management systems and the integration of systems in the maintenance of websites. Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Be enrolled in one of these Plans EMED-BFA, EMED-MIN.
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The Art of Recording (3 credits)
FAM 1050-001
(Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday/Friday, 8-10:30 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy

Art of Recording focuses on the basic technical musical understanding needed to engage music at progressively deeper levels of understanding. Starting from simple listening experiences you will soon be able to appreciate what it means to bean “expert listener.” A musician learns the function of musical scales; a painter, the knowledge paint and brushes; a writer, the craft of words and sentences. The expert listener integrates specific gateways that can reveal the depths of sound possibilities. This course expresses the Art of Recording from basic sound physics, music and brain functions as they pertain to the technology used in producing the popular music we love over the last five decades.
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What’s Hot in Popular Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2062-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration, DC Diversity & Culture, SE Social & Ethical Issues, Mid-Collegiate Experience

This online course examines current popular music in its trending styles and genres. Students will critique selected songs from the weekly “Billboard” charts and various other media resources, including YouTube and digital download statistics, and consider both the hottest artists as well as promising up-and-comers. Students will develop skills for evaluating artistic intent with respect to lyrics, some basic literary techniques, melody, harmony, rhythm, song form and psychology, and with a look at cutting edge production techniques. Students will identify and compare unique composing and performing styles of today’s artists and identify links between the music business and societal trends. Weekly activity will include reading, viewing and listening to examples online and completing assignments on Canopy. No prerequisite. No textbook.
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Session D (1st Half-Term): May 13-June 25

American Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2006-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives

An online history of music in America c. 1620 to the present. Musical life as we experience it in the US today is the product of a history that is in many ways unique, but never far from world-wide influences. This course surveys a wide variety of music along with the social, political and religious movements that have shaped American musical life right up to the present. It examines the contributions of numerous cultural groups, regional developments over four centuries, and the ways music reflects values, aspirations and problems of the population. Course topics include musical genres, styles, personalities and trends. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes and videos are all online. No prior experience with music required.
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Experimental Rock ’60s and ’70s – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2013-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, DC Diversity & Culture, FA Fine Arts

This course will provide a detailed overview of the tools, techniques and musical styles which had a tremendous impact on the aesthetic of various genres of rock music in the 1960s and 1970s, the resonance of which can be observed in many mainstream and non-mainstream musical trends of the last 30 years. It will begin with an examination of multi-tracking tape machines: their development and techniques such as sound on sound, tape-delay and flange, which had become standard practice in studios by the late 1960s. This is followed by a technical overview of electronic instruments, specifically the synthesizer, whose development will be traced from the Theremin. Musical trends such as the 1950s avant-garde and Minimalism will serve as a bridge to examinations of seminal bands such as the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Kraftwerk, Can, Neu:, Brian Eno and the Talking Heads among others; the technical knowledge gained from the initial lectures on tape techniques and electronic instruments will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the music of these artists.
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History of Rock ‘n’ Roll – Online (3 credits)
FAM 3031-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, FA Fine Arts

Rock and Roll had humble beginnings in the Southeastern US, but over time it developed into a force, beyond mere entertainment, that has defined youth culture on a global scale. Rock and Roll culture is embedded in the fabric of youth identity. Rock and Roll music is a commodity that young people use daily, often with an obsessive devotion. Marketing campaigns that target youth are so relentless that young people are under enormous media and social pressure to join the ranks of consumers. The goal of History of Rock and Roll is, therefore, threefold: 1. To provide for students a chronological survey that examines the relationship between the music, its most successful and colorful artists, the associated recording technology and the impact of the genre on American culture. 2. Through critical listening and reading, the course will provide students with useful, evaluative tools so that they can make historically informed and thoughtful decisions about the music they select and enjoy. 3. Finally, the course will encourage students to seek and appreciate new styles, and perhaps inspire those who seek a career as a pop music artist. No prerequisite.
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Music Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2005-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, DC Diversity & Culture, FA Fine Arts

An online course that introduces students to a wide range of music in the Western World, covering several historical periods, including our own time. Examines musical styles, musical terms, composers and other aspects of the music listening experience. Considers the historical and cultural context of musical activity and the way it has shaped the musical life from medieval Europe up to the present in our own communities. Students will discuss their own experiences with music and have the opportunity to attend a musical performance of their choice, near where they live, for class credit. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, videos and film are all online. No prior experience with music required.
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Session A: June 3-July 7

Digital Video for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2002-001 
(Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11 a.m.-1:40 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration
While taking this course, each student is required to write, produce, shoot and edit several projects using digital video cameras, working in a digital nonlinear editing environment, and delivering their content through a variety of digital distribution channels to a specified audience. Prerequisite: EMED 1006 or 1016 or permission of instructor.
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Integrated Media Production I for Non-Majors – Online (3 credits)
EMED 1015-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, TI Technology & Innovation

Integrated Media Production I is an introductory course — the first of a two-course sequence within the E-Media major at CCM — that provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation in the intersecting worlds of digital media production, content development and new media design. This non-major section will satisfy E-Media major requirements. No prerequisite.
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Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, DC Diversity & Culture, FA Fine Arts

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.
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Post Production (3 credits)
EMED 3002-001
(Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2-4:40 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Editing is the means by which raw image and sound are transformed into sequences with narrative development. This course examines the mechanics, aesthetics and theory of editing wherein students analyze, critique and edit a range of hands-on production assignments. During the semester, students explore the various theoretical, technical and aesthetic tasks and decisions involved in editing on an Avid HD digital nonlinear editing system. Through demonstrations and hands-on application, students become familiar with the technical, conceptual, theoretical and aesthetic processes involved in editing in a digital non-linear editing environment. By semester’s end, each student will work with producers from the SCP (EMED 3001) class in taking a project through the entire online post-production process, ingesting footage, preparing a rough cut and then a final cut. Discussions and exercises will cover advanced post-production concepts, techniques and aesthetics, as well as an overview of the various edit configurations, applications and hardware used in contemporary television, independent film and video, commercial and corporate production.
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Session B: July 8-August 10

Integrated Media Production II for Non-Majors – Online (3 credits)
EMED 1016-002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Building on the concepts and production techniques introduced in Integrated Media Production 1, Integrated Media Production 2 explores the connections between digital media, content development and new media design in more depth. The course focuses on screen design issues relevant to the convergence of media assets, such as video and audio, with graphical assets in the communication of message. Prerequisite: EMED 1005 or 1015.
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Session E (2nd Half-Term): June 26-August 10

Disney’s Animated Musicals (3 credits)
FAM 2090-001
(Tuesday/Thursday, 11:15 a.m.-2:10 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course explores the genre of the animated film musical with a special emphasis on its presumed originator, the Walt Disney Studios. We will consider the unique expressive properties of this form, examining the ways in which both song and the animated medium distort, rearrange, and reflect the world for its audiences. As we trace the genre’s history and evolution from the earliest experiments with sound technology to the latest multi-billion-dollar franchises, we will simultaneously track shifting trends in popular song and film. This history will run alongside discussions of Disney’s complex and often problematic roles as a purveyor of American and global entertainment.
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Foundations of Digital Media – Online (3 credits)
DMC 1000-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HU Humanities and Literature, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, Ki Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Introduces the field of Digital Media and Cinematic Arts, the faculty who teach it, and the professionals who practice it. Faculty members will present their research and relate that topic to the wider field of Digital Media and Cinematic Arts. Professionals will present their work and relevant projects. This course encourages students to clarify their course of study and build connections with faculty, professionals and students with similar interests.
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Course Fees and Registration Details

Course fees for part-time students are $534 per credit hour for Ohio residents and $1173 per credit hour for non-residents. Costs include program fees.

UC students can register online at webapps2.uc.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.

Non-UC students can begin the registration process by visiting uc.edu/pathways/nonmatric.html.

CCM News

CCM Musical Theatre Stages Epic ‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame’

From the Oscar-winning team of Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz comes a lush retelling of Victor Hugo’s epic story of love, acceptance and what it means to be a hero.

CCM’s Mainstage Series production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame opens on Thursday, March 7 and continues through Sunday, March 10, 2019, at CCM’s Corbett Auditorium. Directed by CCM Musical Theatre Chair Aubrey Berg, the beloved musical features the college’s student stars of tomorrow with musical direction from Stephen Goers.

Based on the Victor Hugo novel and songs from the Disney animated feature, The Hunchback of Notre Dame features the film’s Academy Award-nominated score, as well as new songs by Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz. Peter Parnell’s book features verbatim passages from Hugo’s gothic novel. Parental discretion is advised.

CCM's 2014 production of "Les Misérables" featured Stephanie Jae Park, who is currently in the US tour of "Hamilton," and Eric Geil, who is in the US Tour of "Book of Mormon."

CCM’s 2014 production of “Les Misérables” featured Stephanie Jae Park, who is currently in the US tour of “Hamilton,” and Eric Geil, who is in the US Tour of “Book of Mormon.”

This isn’t the first time Berg has brought one of Victor Hugo’s dramatic tales to the CCM Mainstage. Berg staged a critically acclaimed production of Les Misérables at CCM in March 2014. CityBeat’s Rick Pender called CCM’s production “powerful and memorable, one of the best musical theater productions on a Cincinnati stage this season.”

“With ‘Hunchback,’ we are employing similar techniques,” Berg says. “Set designer Lindsey Purvis has created a 40-ton timber cathedral of the mind — a poetic rather than literal space — in which the action unfolds. Dean Mogle is supplying a boatload of Medieval costumes and Kelly Yurko and her elves are creating wigs and make-up that would be at home in any painting by Brueghel. Oliver Tidwell-Littleton, currently under contract to the Walt Disney Company, is creating the lighting.”

“There is quite a lot to look at, but the stars of the production are the hard-working actors who play a multitude of roles to bring the story to life. They are true ‘triple threats,’ singing and dancing and acting their hearts out to tell this moving tale.”

The musical begins as bells sound through the famed Notre Dame cathedral in 15th-century Paris. Quasimodo, the deformed bell-ringer, observes all of Paris reveling in the Feast of Fools, but he is held captive by his devious caretaker, the archdeacon Dom Claude Frollo. He escapes for the day and joins the boisterous crowd, only to be treated cruelly by all but the beautiful Esmeralda. Quasimodo isn’t the only one captivated by her free spirit, though — the handsome Captain Phoebus and Frollo are equally enthralled. As the three vie for her attention, Frollo embarks on a mission to destroy the gypsies and it’s up to Quasimodo to save them all.

Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, CCM Musical Theatre took the No. 3 spot in Playbill Magazine’s list of “10 Most Represented Colleges on Broadway” in the 2018-19 season. Cincinnati audiences get the chance to see CCM’s stars of tomorrow perform locally before students move on to the world’s stages.

Berg first came to CCM 32 years ago to direct Nine as part of the college’s Hot Summer Nights performance series. He says that he particularly enjoyed working on CCM’s productions of Evita, West Side Story, The Secret Garden, Into the Woods and Les Misérables. “None of these would have been possible without the help of my collaborators, the musical directors, choreographers and designers who give their all to teach our students professionalism and discipline,” he adds.

Don’t miss your opportunity to see CCM’s stars in the college’s epic production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame on March 7-10, 2019. Tickets on sale now through the CCM Box Office.

CCM’s production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame will last 2 hours and 45 minutes, including a 15-minute intermission.

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THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME
Music by Alan Menken
Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz
Book by Peter Parnell
Based on the Victor Hugo novel and songs from the Disney film
Originally developed by Disney Theatrical Productions

Creative Team

  • Aubrey Berg, director
  • Stephen Goers, musical director
  • Katie Johannigman, choreographer
  • Erin Magner*, production stage manager
  • Dean Mogle, costume designer
  • Oliver Tidwell-Littleton*, lighting designer
  • Matthew Tibbs, sound designer
  • Aria Braswell*, assistant director
  • Kelly Yurko, hair and make-up designer
  • Lindsey Purvis*, scenic designer
  • Hankyu Lee*, associate sound designer
  • Jenny Jones, fight choreographer

* CCM Student

Cast List

  • Andrew Alstat asLieutenant Frederic Charlus
  • Bryce Baxter as Claude Frollo
  • Jack Brewer as Father Dupin
  • Kevin Chlapecka as Clopin Trouillefou
  • Matt Copley as Jehan Frollo
  • Dylan Dougal as Saint Aphrodisius
  • Madison Hagler as King Louis Xi
  • Kendall McCarthy as Florika
  • Jenny Mollet as Esmeralda
  • Sam Pickart as Tribunal
  • Alex Stone as Quasimodo
  • Frankie Thams as Captain Phoebus de Martin
  • Madelaine Vandenberg as Madam
  • Jordan Alexander, Michael Canu, Madison Deadman, Sofie Flores, Kylie Goldstein, Zoe Grolnick, Chip Hawver, Joshua Johnson, Camila Paquet, Bryn Purvis, Mikayla Renfrow, Aaron Richert, Hank Von Kolnitz, Ethan Zeph as Multiple Roles
  • Leo Carmody, Samuel Cohen, Britta Cowan, Christian Feliciano, Carina Florio, Ashton Francis, Colton Harksen, Kai Horvit, Jack Johnson, Christian Kidd, Anna Chase Lanier, Tyler J. Martin, Cassandra Lyn Maurer, Drew Minard, Chesney Mitchell, Stone Mountain, Eli Owens, Ben Pimental, Brandon Schumacker, Matthew Skrovan, Eleanor Zambarano as The Voices of Notre Dame
  • Dance Captains: Joshua Johnson, Bryn Purvis
  • Vocal Warm-Ups: Ben Pimental

Understudies:

  • Quasimodo – Aaron Richert
  • Esmeralda – Camila Paquet
  • Male Cover – Ben Pimental
  • Swings – Tori Heinlein, Sammy Schechter

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Thursday, March 7
  • 8 p.m. Friday, March 8
  • 2 p.m. Saturday, March 9
  • 8 p.m. Saturday, March 9
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, March 10

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Ticket prices start at $32. Discounts are available for UC and non-UC students. Service changes may apply for online orders.

Student rush tickets will be available one hour before each performance to non-UC students, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid Bearcat ID, based on availability.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online through CCM’s e-Box Office.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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Mainstage Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Musical Theatre Production Sponsor: Dr. & Mrs. Carl G. Fischer

Musical Theatre Performance Sponsor: Graeter’s Ice Cream

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI, 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Tel: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

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The Cohen Family Studio Theater at CCM.

CCM Studio Opera Series Stages William Bolcom’s ‘Dinner at Eight’

CCM continues its 2018-19 Studio Series with Dinner at Eight, a new opera by American composer William Bolcom and librettist Mark Campbell. Based on the 1932 Broadway play of the same name by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber, the opera runs Friday, Feb. 22 through Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019, at CCM’s Cohen Family Studio Theater.

The plot follows a group of high-society Americans in the Manhattan of 1931 — just after the Wall Street crash that precipitated the Great Depression. Director Audrey Chait’s program note describes the story:

At first glance, the protagonists are almost comically rich and out-of-touch: Millicent Jordan is fixated on the dinner party she is throwing to impress her socialite friends. Meanwhile, her husband’s business is on the brink of ruin, his health is failing, and her 19-year-old daughter is keeping a scandalous secret. As the story unfolds, it slowly becomes clear that everyone invited to the dinner party is on the brink of a personal disaster, despite their carefully-managed outward appearances.

Dinner at Eight premiered in 2017 at the Minnesota Opera, and relatively few productions have been mounted since then. This version was adapted for two pianos by CCM Associate Professor of Opera Coaching Kathleen Kelly, who also helped with musical preparation for this production. Student conductor Daniel Mallampalli will lead the pianists and vocalists.

“We have kept the original setting because the Great Depression is so important to the fabric of the story that you could even call it a silent character,” says Chait, a CCM Opera Directing student pursuing her Artist Diploma.

“Our production has definite overtones of surrealism and frequent side trips into vaudevillian theatricality. On the surface, Dinner at Eight appears to be a high-society comedy, but as the evening progresses, the story reveals more and more of its darkness.”

Cincinnati audiences will remember Bolcom and his work from CCM’s Fall 2015 performances of his cabaret songs, when the composer visited CCM to coach students and enjoy the show. The music of Dinner at Eight evokes Bolcom’s cabaret works and Broadway tunes.

“We are very lucky to be working on Dinner at Eight so soon after its world premiere; it is an honor to contribute to the early life and production history of this opera,” Chait says.

You can enjoy the Cincinnati premiere of Dinner at Eight from February 22 through 24, 2019, at CCM’s Cohen Family Studio Theater. Admission is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, February 18. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.
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Cast List

  • Shannon Cochran as Millicent Jordan
  • Gabriella Sam as Carlotta Vance
  • Claire Lopatka as Kitty Packard
  • Maria Miller as Lucy Talbot
  • Heidi Middendorf as Paula Jordan
  • Victor Cardamone as Larry Renault
  • Joshua Cook as Oliver Jordan
  • Antonio Cruz as Dan Packard
  • John Siarris as Joseph Talbot
  • Michael Hyatt as Max
  • Mia Athey as Tina
  • Maddy Jentsch as Miss Alden/Maid
  • Lindsay Webber as Miss Copeland/Maid
  • Tayte Mitchell as Eddy
  • Justin Burgess as Mr. Hatfield
  • Turner Staton as Gustave

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22
  • 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24

Location
Cohen Family Studio Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Admission is free. Reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. Please visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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Opera Department Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Rosenthal
Opera Production Sponsor: Genevieve Smith

 

Story by CCM graduate student Alexandra Doyle

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