Watch CCM piano majors perform in 3-part ‘COVID Etude Project’

CCM presents three concert streams featuring piano students performing in Robert J. Werner Recital Hall and in other performance spaces throughout the world!

Presented in conjunction with the CCMONSTAGE Online series of concert streams, the COVID Etude Project showcases three complete sets of etudes by composers Franz Liszt, Claude Debussy and William Bolcom, performed by CCM students and streamed online nightly from Friday, March 26 through Sunday, March 28. Each concert will stream simultaneously on CCM’s websiteYouTube channel and Facebook page.

“The COVID Etude Project is a joint-studio project of mine and Professor Ran Dank,” says CCM Associate Professor of Piano Soyeon Kate Lee. “It was conceived to keep our students motivated and create a sense of purpose and community during this unprecedented time.”

“Many of our students are overseas, some whom we have never met in-person, and we have tried to make the most of our time on Zoom together and build a studio community despite the circumstances.”

As explained by arts writer Janelle Gelfand in her preview of CCM’s COVID Etude Project for the Cincinnati Business Courier: “Etudes are difficult studies for mastering a technical challenge, such as runs, leaps, octaves or arpeggios. They are also engaging musical works. Composers such as Chopin, Debussy, Liszt and Rachmaninoff wrote etudes meant for the concert hall.”

The first concert stream at 7:30 p.m. EDT on March 26 features Liszt’s Transcendental Études, a 12-part piece published in 1852. The episode is roughly one hour long.

The second stream at 7:30 p.m. EDT on March 27 showcases Debussy’s Twelve Études, composed in 1915 and regarded as one of the more challenging works in the piano repertoire. The episode is approximately 50 minutes long.

The final stream at 7:30 p.m. EDT on March 28 shares Bolcom’s Twelve New Etudes written between 1977 and 1986. The episode is 45 minutes long.

After each premiere broadcast, all three installments of the COVID Etude Project will remain available for on-demand viewing on CCM’s websiteYouTube channel and Facebook page.

Students recorded one etude each wherever they were — some students performed in CCM’s Robert J. Werner Recital Hall, while others gave their performances at home or in piano showrooms near their residences.

“Seeing our students take up this challenge with so much energy, professionalism and positive spirit is so gratifying to see, and definitely has been one of the highlights for me at CCM,” said Lee.

CCM’s COVID Etude Project is produced by Joel Crawford Recording and is made possible by generous support from Louis and Susan Meisel.

Learn more about CCM’s upcoming video releases courtesy of Janelle Gelfand and the Cincinnati Business Courier.

Streaming Premiere

  • Liszt’s Transcendental Études: 7:30 p.m. EDT Friday, March 26, 2021
  • Debussy’s Twelve Études: 7:30 p.m. EDT Saturday, March 27, 2021
  • Bolcom’s Twelve New Etudes: 7:30 p.m. EDT Sunday, March 28, 2021

Performance Details

Liszt’s Transcendental Études Performers and Repertoire

  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 1, “Preludio”
    • Performed by Robert Brooks Carlson, Master of Music student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 2, “Fusées”
    • Performed by Robert Brooks Carlson, Master of Music student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 3, “Paysage”
    • Performed by Sooyeon Baik, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 4, “Mazeppa”
    • Performed by Lywon Yeo, Artist Diploma student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 5, “Feux Follets”
    • Performed by Wen Pan, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 6, “Vision”
    • Performed by Jiwon Son, Artist Diploma student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 7, “Eroica”
    • Performed by Mu-tien Lai, Master of Music student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 8, “Wilde Jagd”
    • Performed by Tianmi Wu, Master of Music student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 9, “Ricordanza”
    • Performed by Zhaoyi Long, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 10 in F Minor
    • Performed by Gwangwon Park, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 11, “Harmonies du soir”
    • Performed by Jeremy Ho, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Liszt: Transcendental Études, No. 12, “Chasse-neige”
    • Performed by Nicholas Ho, Doctor of Musical Arts student

Debussy’s Twelve Études Performers and Repertoire

  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 1, “Pour les cinq doigts” (d’après Monsieur Czerny)
    • Performed by Ye Qian, Bachelor of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 2, “Pour les tierces”
    • Performed by Shaoming Yang, Master of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 3, “Pour les quartes”
    • Performed by Chisato Fuji, Bachelor of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 4, “Pour les sixtes”
    • Performed by Yiyue Su, Bachelor of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 5, “Pour les octaves”
    • Performed by Anjun Zheng, Master of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 6, “Pour les huit doigts”
    • Performed by Angela Pui-Yee Lau, Master of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 7, “Pour les degrés chromatiques”
    • Performed by Dongqin Yu, Bachelor of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 8, “Pour les agréments”
    • Performed by Yuyao Qu, Bachelor of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 9, “Pour les notes répétées”
    • Performed by Helena Kim, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 10, “Pour les sonorités opposées”
    • Performed by Hyrum Arnesen, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 11, “Pour les arpèges composés”
    • Performed by Gavin Davis, Bachelor of Music student
  • Debussy: Twelve Études, No. 12, “Pour les accords”
    • Performed by Jiao Sun, Artist Diploma student

Bolcom’s Twelve New Etudes Performers and Repertoire

  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book I, No. 1, “Fast, furious”
    • Performed by Stuart Zhang, Master of Music student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book I, No. 2, “Récitatif”
    • Performed by Stuart Zhang, Master of Music student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book I, No. 3, “Mirrors”
    • Performed by Seran Lee, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book II, No. 4, “Scène d’opéra”
    • Performed by Catharine Baek, Bachelor of Music student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book II, No. 5, “Butterflies, hummingbirds”
    • Performed by Ming-Li Liu, Master of Music student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book II, No. 6, “Nocturne”
    • Performed by Joseph Vaz, Master of Music student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book III, No. 7, “Premonitions”
    • Performed by PyeongAn Kim, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book III, No. 8, “Rag infernal (Syncopes apocalyptiques)”
    • Performed by Yaoyue Huang, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book III, No. 9, “Invention”
    • Performed by Yu-Chia Kuo, Master of Music student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book IV, No. 10, “Vers le silence”
    • Performed by Ariadne Antipa, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book IV, No. 11, “Hi-jinks”
    • Performed by Vikki Chen, Doctor of Musical Arts student
  • Bolcom: Twelve New Études – Book IV, No. 12, “Hymne á l’amour”
    • Performed by Scott Sherman, Doctor of Musical Arts student

Creative Team

CCM COVID Etude Project Directors
Ran Dank, Assistant Professor of Piano
Soyeon Kate Lee, Associate Professor of Piano

COVID Etude Project Produced By
Joel Crawford Recording
http://www.joelcrawfordrecording.com

Keyboard Studies Division Head
Michelle Conda

Piano Technicians
Rebekah Whitacre
Eric Wolfley

Senior Director of Performance Operations
Rayburn Dobson

CCMONSTAGE Online Series Concept Developed and Managed by
Curt Whitacre 

CCM Digital Content Team
Kenneth D. Allen
Clarence M. Brown
Kevin Burke
Rebecca Butts
Rayburn Dobson
Mikki Graff
Melissa Neeley-Nicolini
Jeanne Rose
Simón Sotelo
Stephanie Temeles
Curt Whitacre


A preeminent institution for the performing and media arts, the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music offers nearly 120 possible majors, along with a wide variety of pre-collegiate and post-graduate programs.

The synergy created by housing CCM within a comprehensive public university gives the college its unique character and defines its objective: to educate and inspire the whole artist and scholar for positions on the world stage.

For more information, please visit us online at ccm.uc.edu.


CCM News CCM Video CCMONSTAGE
CCM Professor Emeritus Eiji Hashimoto.

In Memoriam: CCM Professor Emeritus Eiji Hashimoto

We are saddened to share news of the passing of CCM Professor Emeritus Eiji Hashimoto, Professor of Harpsichord and Harpsichordist-in-Residence at CCM from 1968 to 2001. Hashimoto passed away on Jan. 14, 2021, at the age of 89. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Hashimoto; his three children: Christine (Kirk) Merritt, Ken (Allison Dubinski) Hashimoto, and Erica Hashimoto; and five granddaughters: Katherine and Elizabeth Merritt, Scarlette and Sabina Hashimoto, and Naomi Hashimoto. A memorial service will be scheduled at a later date.

An internationally renowned concert artist and scholar of baroque music, Hashimoto performed with critical acclaim throughout the United States and around the world. As a soloist, he dazzled audiences in more than 50 international tours and released numerous CDs. His own editions of 18th-century keyboard music remain highly regarded.

Born in Tokyo in 1931, Hashimoto began musical training as a child and graduated from the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music with a major in organ in 1955. He came to the US under a Fulbright study grant to pursue graduate studies in musicology and composition at the University of Chicago (Master of Arts in 1959) and then in harpsichord at the Yale University School of Music (Master of Music in 1962) under Ralph Kirkpatrick.

Upon returning to Japan, Hashimoto taught at the Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo until he was invited by the French government to spend six months in France doing research in 1967. During his subsequent US tour, he performed in Cincinnati, which led to an invitation to teach at CCM beginning in 1968.

Hashimoto maintained an active performance and recording schedule throughout his 33-year long tenure at CCM. During this time he performed with many CCM ensembles, spent several summers conducting for CCM’s Opera Theatre of Lucca program in Italy, and also performed with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and at the May Festival.

Hashimoto also formed CCM’s Ensemble for Eighteenth Century Music, recording with the ensemble and taking it on several tours, including to Japan in 1988, to Mexico in 1993, and to many cities across the US. The El Porvenir newspaper in Monterrey, Mexico, declared “They came, they played and they conquered” following Hashimoto’s November 1993 performance with CCM’s Ensemble for Eighteenth Century Music. In 2001, Hashimoto’s then-colleague (and now emeriti faculty member) Clare Callahan told the Cincinnati Enquirer, “Eiji is our Baroque touchstone … and his dedicated work with the Eighteenth Century Orchestra gave students and faculty alike a sense of the fun people had with music of that time.”

In 1978 and 1981, Hashimoto received the Prize of Excellence from the Japanese government for his recitals in Tokyo. In 1984, he received UC’s coveted Rieveschl Award for Excellence in Scholarly and Creative Works. He was a recipient of the Ohio Arts Council’s solo artist grant, was also selected for the 1988-89 Arts Midwest Performing Arts Touring Program and was awarded the “Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels,” the highest honor awarded by the state of Kentucky for special achievements, by the governor of Kentucky in 1990. He was twice awarded research grants by the Rockefeller Foundation for scholarly residencies in Bellagio, Italy.

Please join us in sending your thoughts, prayers and condolences to Eiji’s family and friends. You can learn more about Eiji’s career by visiting Janelle Gelfand’s “Janelle’s Notes” blog. Tributes can be shared through the Neidhard-Young Funeral Home website. A memorial service will be scheduled at a later date. Eiji influenced and inspired multiple generations of students, colleagues and music lovers during his three decades at CCM. He will be deeply missed.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare
CSO musicians on stage during the CSO's "Live from Music Hall" concert stream.

CCM faculty featured in CSO’s grand return to Music Hall

CSO musicians on stage during the CSO's "Live from Music Hall" concert stream.

The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s “Live from Music Hall” performance is available to stream online

The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra mounted its first live performance in Music Hall since the outbreak of COVID-19 forced the cancellation of the remainder of its season. The Live from Music Hall performance, initially streamed on Saturday, May 16, is available to watch online.

The performance featured the launch of the CSO’s Fanfare Project, which commissions new music from more than a dozen composers to “inspire and uplift and to help us make sense of this moment in our shared history through the universal language of music.” CCM Professor and CSO Principal Oboe Dwight Parry gave the world premiere of the Fanfare Project’s first composition vitres (fragment…) by CSO Creative Partner Matthias Pintscher in the opening of the live-streamed concert.

CSO pianist and CCM Professor Michael Chertock with CSO principal cello and CCM Professor Ilya Finkelshteyn.

CSO pianist and CCM Professor Michael Chertock with CSO principal cello and CCM Professor Ilya Finkelshteyn.

Following the world premiere, four CSO musicians took the stage to perform Mahler’s Piano Quartet in A Minor — while maintaining social distances and wearing face masks. The performance featured CCM professors Michael Chertock, piano, and Ilya Finkelshteyn, cello; as well as CSO concertmaster Stefani Matsuo and principal viola Christian Colberg.

“The event was one step forward to the time when theaters will reopen, and we won’t be afraid to share a live communal experience,” wrote arts reporter Janelle Gelfand in her review for the Cincinnati Business Courier. “It was a message of hope that eventually our arts and culture will re-emerge.”

Watch the full performance online.


Images captured from the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s concert video.

CCM News CCM Video Faculty Fanfare
CCM student Elena Villalón (center) with the other winners of the 2019 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. From left to right: Miles Mykkanen, William Guanbo Su, Elena Villalón, Thomas Glass and Michaela Wolz. Photography courtesy of Ken Howard.

CCM Student Elena Villalón Named Grand Finals Winner of the Metropolitan Opera’s 2019 National Council Auditions

CCM student Elena Villalón (center) with the other winners of the 2019 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. From left to right: Miles Mykkanen, William Guanbo Su, Elena Villalón, Thomas Glass and Michaela Wolz. Photography courtesy of Ken Howard.

CCM student Elena Villalón (center) with the other winners of the 2019 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. From left to right: Miles Mykkanen, William Guanbo Su, Elena Villalón, Thomas Glass and Michaela Wolz. Photography courtesy of Ken Howard.

We are thrilled to report that current CCM student Elena Villalón has been named a Grand Finals Winner of the Metropolitan Opera’s 2019 National Council Auditions! After a months-long series of auditions involving more than 1,000 singers at the district, regional and national levels, a panel of expert judges named Villalón and four other singers as the winners of the 65th annual Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. Each winner receives a $15,000 cash prize. You can learn more about all of the 2019 National Council Winners by visiting www.metopera.org/about/auditions/national-council-auditions/winners.

Senior Voice Performance major Elena Villalón has been named a Grand Finals Winner of the Metropolitan Opera’s 2019 National Council Auditions.

Senior Voice Performance major Elena Villalón has been named a Grand Finals Winner of the Metropolitan Opera’s 2019 National Council Auditions.

A soprano from Austin, Texas, who studies with CCM Professor William McGraw, Villalón joins Houston Grand Opera’s studio artist program in the 2019-20 season, after being a finalist and winning the audience prize in the 31st annual Eleanor McCollum Competition. She has been a vocal fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center and at Houston Grand Opera’s Young Artist Vocal Academy. Her CCM performances include the roles of Adele in Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Lucy in Menotti’s The Telephone and Miss Wordsworth in Britten’s Albert Herring.

As previously reported, fellow CCM-trained singers  Joshua Wheeker, tenor (CCM Voice 2007-2012); Murrella Parton (MM Voice, 2017) also advanced to the Met’s National Council Semi-Finals this year.

This marks the second consecutive year that CCM singers have “won the Met,” as CCM alumna Jessica Faselt (MM Voice, 2016) was one of five singers who won the 2018 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. You can learn more about Faselt’s win courtesy of the Cincinnati Business Courier.

CCM alumni and students frequently advance to the final rounds of the Met’s National Council Auditions, which is widely considered to be the nation’s most prestigious vocal competition. In 2017, four CCM alumni competed in the semi-finals, including Faselt; Summer Hassan, soprano (MM Voice, 2014); Andrew Manea, baritone (MM Voice, 2016); and Cody Quattlebaum, bass-baritone (BM Voice, 2015) — who was chosen as a finalist during that year’s national competition.

About the Metropolitan Opera’s National Council Auditions

Following the creation of the Met’s National Council in the 1952-53 season, the first Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions took place in 1954 in the Twin Cities. For over 60 years, the annual competition has helped launch the careers of countless young singers, including some of opera’s greatest stars. Every season, over 100 former participants in the National Council Auditions appear on the Met roster.

The district-level and regional auditions, held across the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and Mexico, are sponsored by the Metropolitan Opera National Council and administered by National Council members and hundreds of volunteers from across the country. Currently in its 65th year, the program has launched the careers of such well-known stars as Renée FlemingSusan GrahamFrederica von StadeDeborah VoigtLawrence BrownleeThomas HampsonEric Owens, Angela MeadeNadine SierraJamie Barton and Ryan Speedo Green. The competition garnered international attention with the release of the 2008 feature-length documentary The Audition, directed by award-winning filmmaker Susan Froemke, which chronicled the 2007 National Council Auditions season and Grand Finals Concert.

 

Student Salutes
The Ariel Quartet. From left to right: Alexandra Kazovsky, Jan Grüning, Amit Even-Tov and Gershon Gerchikov.

Ariel Quartet Concert Series Continues Oct. 25 at CCM

After its stunning opening performance of the 2016-17 season in September, the Ariel Quartet returns to CCM in concert at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 25 in Corbett Auditorium with a program featuring the works of Mozart, Shostakovich and Dvořák. Tickets are available through the CCM Box Office.

The Ariel Quartet, string quartet-in-residence at CCM.

The Ariel Quartet, string quartet-in-residence at CCM. Photo by Saverio Truglia.

The Ariel Quartet is comprised of Alexandra Kazovsky, violin; Amit Even-Tov, cello; Gershon Gerchikov, violin; and Jan Grüning, viola. Grand Prize winners at the 2006 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition and 2014 recipients of the prestigious Cleveland Quartet Award, the Quartet was formed in Israel 16 years ago and now serves as CCM’s distinguished string quartet-in-residence.

Cincinnati Enquirer writer Janelle Gelfand said nearly every seat in CCM’s Corbett Auditorium was filled for the Quartet’s Sept. 6 opening concert and praised the “vibrant” performance.

“I loved the way these musicians traded phrases in Beethoven’s Quartet No. 1 in F Major, Op. 18, No. 1,” she wrote on Janelle’s Notes. “It was conversational, witty and vibrant. The Adagio was the picture of beautiful singing line and depth of feeling. The German word “himmlisch” (heavenly) came to mind.”

Join us at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25 in Corbett Auditorium as CCM’s string quartet-in-residence presents works from powerhouse composers Mozart, Shostakovich and Dvořák.

Repertoire
MOZART: String Quartet No. 14 in G Major, K. 387
SHOSTAKOVICH: String Quartet No. 3 in F Major, Op. 73
DVOŘÁK: String Quartet No. 12 in F Major, Op. 96 (“American Quartet”)

Performance Time
8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village,
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Tickets are $25 for general admission, $15 for non-UC students and FREE for UC students with valid ID.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online now through our e-Box Office! Visit ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice for CCM Box Office hours and location.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____

The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation: Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor
____

Story by CCM Graduate Student Charlotte Kies

CCM News
A banner for the Richard Tucker Music Foundation.

CCM Alumnae Tamara Wilson and Amanda Woodbury Receive Major Awards from Richard Tucker Music Foundation

We are ecstatic to report that CCM alumnae Tamara Wilson (BM Voice, 2004) and Amanda Woodbury (MM Voice, 2012) have both received major awards from the prestigious Richard Tucker Music Foundation.

Wilson, a soprano who studied with Barbara Honn while attending CCM, has been named winner of the 2016 Richard Tucker Award. Dubbed the “Heisman Trophy of Opera,” the Tucker Award carries the foundation’s most substantial cash prize of $50,000, and is conferred each year by a panel of opera industry professionals on an American singer at the threshold of a major international career. Featuring such luminaries as Renée Fleming, Stephanie Blythe, Lawrence Brownlee, David Daniels, Christine Goerke and Joyce DiDonato, the list of past winners reads like a who’s who of American opera. Wilson is a previous recipient of the Foundation’s Sara Tucker Study Grant in 2008 and Richard Tucker Career Grant in 2011.

Barry Tucker, president of the Richard Tucker Music Foundation and son of the Brooklyn-born tenor, commented, “I first met Tamara Wilson when she auditioned for – and won – a Sara Tucker Study Grant in 2008. I was blown away not only by the power and sheer beauty of her voice, but also by how grounded she is as a person. Last year, when I was listening to the Saturday matinee broadcast of Aida from the Met and realized it was her singing the title role, I couldn’t have been more impressed by how she’s evolved as an artist. She has a bright future ahead of her, and we are thrilled to have her as our 2016 Richard Tucker Award winner.”

Wilson is not the only CCM-trained singer honored by the Richard Tucker Music Foundation this year. Woodbury, a soprano who studied with William McGraw while attending CCM, has been named a 2016 Richard Tucker Career Grant recipient. Selected through a vocal competition, these grants are provided to singers who have begun professional careers and who have already performed roles with opera companies nationally or internationally. As previously reported, Woodbury was awarded the Foundation’s Sara Tucker Grant in 2014.

About the Richard Tucker Music Foundation
Founded in 1975, the Richard Tucker Music Foundation is a non-profit cultural organization that honors the artistic legacy of the great American tenor through support of talented American opera singers and by bringing opera into the community.

The Foundation’s awards program offers grants for study, performance opportunities and other career-enhancing activities, thereby providing professional development for singers at several levels of career-readiness. You can learn more about the Richard Tucker Music Foundation by visiting richardtucker.org/about.

Soprano Tamara Wilson (BM Voice, 2004).

Soprano Tamara Wilson (BM Voice, 2004).

About Tamara Wilson
American soprano Tamara Wilson made her much-anticipated Metropolitan Opera debut in December of 2014 in the title role of Aida, when the New York Times praised the “laserlike authority of her high notes,” and observed: “Her voice blooms with her palpable involvement in her own story: Her singing is urgent, her physical performance restrained yet powerful.”

Nominated for a 2016 Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement in Opera after her English National Opera debut last fall as Leonora in La forza del destino, the soprano will make further debuts next season at the Bayerischer Staatsoper and Deutsche Oper Berlin. She was a finalist in the 2004 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, a Grand Prize Winner at Barcelona’s Annual Francisco Viñas Competition, a winner of the George London Award and the recipient of both a 2008 Sara Tucker Study Grant and a 2011 Richard Tucker Career Grant from the Richard Tucker Music Foundation.

After launching the present season headlining Aida at the Aspen Music Festival, Wilson returned to Oper Frankfurt as Elisabeth de Valois in Don Carlo; sang Lucrezia in Verdi’s I due Foscari in Santiago, Chile; made her Cleveland Orchestra debut; and joined Marin Alsop for Mahler in São Paulo. Back in the States after touring Japan as Rosalinde in Die Fledermaus under the baton of Seiji Ozawa, the soprano looks forward to taking Brahms’s German Requiem on an East Coast tour with Seraphic Fire and singing Desdemona in Otello at Cincinnati’s May Festival, in celebration of James Conlon’s 37th and final year as Music Director. Last season Wilson made her role and house debuts headlining Norma at Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu, following recent debuts at Houston Grand Opera, Washington National Opera, Los Angeles Opera, and Carnegie Hall. In addition to being a CCM graduate, Wilson is also an alumna of the Houston Grand Opera Studio.

CCM alumna Amanda Woodbury.

CCM alumna Amanda Woodbury.

About Amanda Woodbury
An alumna of Los Angeles Opera’s Domingo-Colburn-Stein Young Artist Program, Amanda Woodbury was recently honored with the second place and Audience Choice awards in Plácido Domingo’s Operalia Competition. She also won the 2014 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, a 2014 Sara Tucker Study Grant, and both second place and Audience Choice awards at Houston Grand Opera’s Eleanor McCollum Competition.

Woodbury made her professional debut as Micaëla in Carmen at Los Angeles Opera, where she returned as Papagena in Die Zauberflöte. She then joined the roster of the Metropolitan Opera, appearing as Tebaldo in Don Carlo and covering the roles of Antonia and Stella in Les Contes d’Hoffmann.

This season she sang Leïla in Les pêcheurs de perles at the Met, and looks forward to appearing as Musetta in La bohème with the Los Angeles Opera. Having taken part in the Met’s “Rising Stars” concert tour, she looks forward to headlining a new Met production of Roméo et Juliette and making house debuts at PORTopera as Micaëla in Carmen and at Atlanta Opera as Konstanze in Die Entführung aus dem Serail. Woodbury completed her Master’s Degree in Vocal Performance at CCM in 2012, after receiving her Bachelor of Music from Indiana University.

In a 2014 interview with the Cincinnati Enquirer, Woodbury reflected on her recent success and on her time at CCM, telling Janelle Gelfand:

“I sang two roles onstage [at CCM], Donna Anna in Don Giovanni and Madame Lidoine in Dialogues of the Carmelites. I can’t tell you how much that has helped my career. It helped me to prepare for the next step, and just everything they did opened up doors for me. I’m so glad I went to CCM, because I passed up Juilliard for CCM.”

You can read the Enquirer‘s full interview with Woodbury online here.

Learn more about the achievements of CCM’s students and alumni by subscribing to The Village News!
____________________

Story by Curt Whitacre

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News
Cherished by music-lovers since its 1843 premiere, DON PASQUALE will delight audiences of all ages. Mark Gibson conducts this beloved opera buffa, with stage direction by Omer Ben-Seadia. Photography by Mark Lyons.

CCM Announces 2016 Opera Scholarship Competition Results

Five voice students were named winners of CCM’s 2016 Opera Scholarship Competition, which was held on Saturday, March 12, in UC’s Corbett Auditorium.

Since its inauguration in 1976, the annual competition welcomes current and incoming CCM voice students to compete for scholarships and cash prizes, and a panel of judges composed of opera industry professionals selects each year’s class of prizewinners.

The 2016 CCM Opera Scholarship Competition winners are:

Kayleigh Decker (first year Master of Music student)
From Woodstock, Md., studying with William McGraw
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Corbett Award ($15,000)
The Corbett Award is supported by the Corbett Foundation in cooperation with the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.

Christian Pursell (first year Master of Music student)
From Aptos, Calif., studying with Thomas Baresel
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Italo Tajo Memorial Award ($15,000)
This award is supported by the Italo Tajo Memorial Scholarship Fund (established by Mr. Tajo’s wife, Mrs. Inelda Tajo) in cooperation with the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.

Erica Intilangelo (second year Master of Music student)
From Fairfield, Conn., studying with William McGraw
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Andrew White Memorial Award ($12,500)
This award is supported by the Andrew White Memorial Scholarship Fund in cooperation with the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.

Murrella Parton (first year Master of Music student)
From Seymour, Tenn., studying with William McGraw
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Seybold-Russell Award ($10,000)
The Seybold-Russell Award is supported by the Seybold-Russell Scholarship Fund in cooperation with the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.

Grace Newberry (first year Master of Music student)
From San Rafael, Calif., studying with William McGraw
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the John Alexander Memorial Award ($10,000)
This award is sponsored by the John Alexander Memorial Scholarship Fund in cooperation with the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.

The following student also received an award as part of the competition:

Alexandra Schoeny (incoming Doctor of Musical Arts student)
From Cincinnati, Ohio
Prize: Corbett Incentive Award for new graduate students ($2,000)
This award is supported by the Corbett Foundation in cooperation with the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.

The judges’ panel for CCM’s 2016 Opera Scholarship Competition included:

  • Michael Heaston, Director of the Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program and Advisor to the Artistic Director at Washington National Opera and Associate Artistic Director of Glimmerglass Festival
  • Peter Kazaras, Professor of Music and Director of Opera at UCLA Herb Albert School of Music
    Stage Director
  • Viswa Subbaraman, Artistic and Music Director of the Skylight Music Theatre in Milwaukee

About CCM Opera
The Department of Opera at CCM boasts one of the most comprehensive training programs for opera singers, coaches and directors in the United States. Students at CCM work with some of the most renowned teachers and artists active in opera today.

CCM students frequently advance to the final rounds of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. As recently reported by the Cincinnati Enquirer, four singers with ties to CCM advanced to the semi-final round of this year’s Met Auditions.

In addition, CCM’s Mainstage and Studio Series of Opera have received some of the National Opera Association Production Competition’s highest honors throughout the years, taking home six of the 18 non-professional prizes awarded in 2010 and four prizes in 2011.

CCM Opera graduates have performed on the stages of the world’s greatest opera companies, including Cincinnati Opera, Metropolitan Opera (New York), Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Royal Opera (London), La Scala (Italy) and more.

CCM’s 2015-16 opera season concludes next month with Janáček’s classic The Cunning Little Vixen (April 8 – 10), conducted by Mark Gibson with stage direction by Vince DeGeorge. Learn more about the production at ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/mainstage/cunning-little-vixen.
____________________ 

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Community Partner: ArtsWave

CCM News Student Salutes
Through this new Diversity Fellowship Program, students will get to perform with the CSO while completing a graduate degree at CCM.

Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music Awarded $900,000 by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO) and University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) are honored to announce the two institutions are the combined recipient of a $900,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This grant will be used to pilot a groundbreaking collaborative fellowship program aimed at developing young, graduate-level musicians from underrepresented populations and preparing them for the professional orchestra world.

The CSO/CCM Diversity Fellowship Program responds to a need among American orchestras and professional music conservatories, which face issues of underrepresentation, and is driven by the mutual desire of the CSO and CCM to foster a more inclusive environment in the orchestral industry. Selected graduate school Fellows from underrepresented populations will participate in a specialized two-year program that is already garnering attention among leaders throughout the music world. This educational opportunity will consist of frequent performances with the CSO, focused mentorship by professional CSO musicians, and simultaneous enrollment in a master’s or artist diploma degree program at CCM where fellows will be guided by CCM’s illustrious faculty.

Learn more at Cincinnati.com.

Learn more at Cincinnati.com.

“We looked at the data and saw that only four percent of American orchestra musicians were African-American or Latino, a figure that is also reflected in conservatory settings,” said Trey Devey, CSO President. “The CSO and CCM felt it essential to address this issue head-on and provide life-changing experiences within a highly creative and multidisciplinary artistic environment for graduate-level musicians across the country.”

“There are many fine programs designed to address underrepresentation in our industry, but none of those experiences include both a major American symphony orchestra and a major conservatory. Together, CCM and the CSO will provide unparalleled experiential learning opportunities for young musicians on the verge of a professional career,” said CCM Dean Peter Landgren.

“CCM and the CSO are perfectly positioned for this initiative. Our organizations’ recent partnership with the Cincinnati World Piano Competition, our joint Conducting Fellowship, as well as the large number of CSO musicians who are CCM alumni and serve as CCM faculty, speak to the deep connections between our two institutions. As the birthplace of cooperative education, the University of Cincinnati also serves as the perfect backdrop for this new approach to professional mentorship for musicians,” said Mr. Landgren.

CCM's Concert Orchestra, performing at the annual Moveable Feast gala event.

CCM’s Concert Orchestra, performing at the annual Moveable Feast gala event.

How the Fellowship Works
The four-year pilot program, as funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will graduate two classes of up to five Fellows each through June 2019. Fellows will consist of graduate level string musicians who are simultaneously enrolled in CCM’s master’s or artist diploma degree programs. Each class of Fellows will include up to two violins, and one each of viola, cello and double bass. They will perform five weeks per season with the CSO in a progressive sequence of concert weeks based on program difficulty, with one week focused on community engagement and educational activities.

These Fellows will be provided with a unique support system built on intensive professional mentorship. In addition to the community formed with other Fellows, they will receive focused mentorship by CSO musicians, which includes advance coaching sessions prior to a rehearsal cycle, ongoing stand partner coaching throughout rehearsal weeks and post-performance feedback. There will also be structured time for non-performance related mentorship such as career counseling and audition preparation.

Additionally, Fellows will receive a CCM Fellowship Stipend and one time Graduate Dean’s Excellence Award, with opportunities for additional performing and non-performing community engagement activities through CCM, eight career development seminars including mock auditions and full tuition scholarships.

Application procedures and deadlines will be announced at a later date.

The Anticipated Impact
It is anticipated this new fellowship opportunity will attract talented young musicians from throughout the nation.

“I think I speak for all the musicians of the CSO, and particularly those of us who will be deeply involved in mentoring, that in seeking to identify and prepare more underrepresented musicians for orchestral auditions, we will be helping make American orchestras richer,” said Stacey Woolley, CSO violinist. “There is such a varied career path available to musicians in every facet of professional music, and fostering this awareness with the next generation will continue to serve orchestras and communities for decades to come.”

An alumnus of CCM, Landgren has a first-hand understanding of the life changing opportunities this new initiative will provide. “As a student at CCM, I had the rare privilege of performing as an extra musician with the CSO. That transformative learning experience led to my 29-year career as a musician with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra,” he explained. “When I returned to CCM as the Dean, developing a program to provide similar opportunities for tomorrow’s professional musicians became a driving priority.”

Both the CSO and CCM extend sincere gratitude to The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its extraordinary impact in making this Diversity Fellowship Program a reality.

“Without the extraordinary support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this groundbreaking new fellowship program simply wouldn’t be possible,” said Mr. Devey. “It advances the Orchestra’s already strong and award winning commitment to more inclusiveness, a goal we share with the community we serve.”

“This generous gift from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation will enhance the already world-class UC College-Conservatory of Music and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra by enabling a unique partnership between two great Cincinnati institutions,” said UC Foundation President Rodney Grabowski. “The collaboration is a great example of the university’s commitment to inclusion initiatives, focus on the cooperative education and dedication to the performing arts.”

For more information about about this historic announcement, check out Janelle Gelfand’s coverage on Cincinnati.com today and be sure to pick up the Sunday, July 19, edition of the Cincinnati Enquirer for the full story!

CCM News

CCM Alumnus Edward Nelson Makes Professional Debut in San Francisco Opera’s ‘Two Women’

Janelle Gelfand reviews Marco Tutino’s new opera Two Women, which serves as a San Francisco Opera debut for CCM alumnus Edward Nelson (BM Voice, 2011; MM Voice, 2013)!

You can read her full recap online at here.

janellesnotes

Italian diva Anna Caterina Antonacci took her cue from Sophia Loren as the character Cesira in "Two Women" Italian diva Anna Caterina Antonacci took her cue from Sophia Loren as the character Cesira in “Two Women”

Marco Tutino’s new opera “Two Women,” which takes place in war-torn Italy during World War II, has one stirring moment. Near the end of Act I, Rosetta (sung by Sarah Shafer), the 16-year-old daughter of Cesira, lifts her pure-toned soprano in a poignant prayer for peace. It becomes a touching anthem for the whole village, as they join her a lush chorus, singing “Father, do not abandon us,” as battles are growing closer to their village.

To a full War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco Opera presented the world premiere on Saturday of the hotly-anticipated opera, “Two Women” (“La Ciociara”) by Tutino, to his libretto with Fabio Ceresa. As the creators told us in a panel discussion on Friday, the opera is based on Alberto Moravia’s novel, but not so…

View original post 1,064 more words

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News
Cincinnati World Piano Competition 2014 Finals Concert with the CSO.

24 International Competitors Take the Stage This Week for the Cincinnati World Piano Competition

CCM’s Summer Performance Series is heating up this week with the return of the Cincinnati World Piano Competition!

If you missed the coverage in yesterday’s Cincinnati Enquirer, you can find Janelle Gelfand‘s extensive report on the Competition online here. See how our new bracket format works in the video below!

The First Round of the 2015 Cincinnati World Piano Competition continues through June 10, with the Semifinal Round scheduled for June 11. On Saturday, June 13, our finalists take the stage with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra for the summer’s can’t-miss concert!

Tickets are still available for all rounds of the Competition and are on sale now through the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Box Office!

CCM News CCM Video