Demarre McGill, CCM's new Associate Professor of Flute. Photography by Denver Rispel.

Acclaimed Musician Demarre McGill Is Named Associate Professor of Flute at CCM

CCM Dean Stanley E. Romanstein has announced the appointment of Demarre McGill to the position of Associate Professor of Flute at CCM. McGill joined CCM’s faculty on a visiting basis in 2017. His new appointment will begin on Aug. 15, 2019.

Winner of the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant and Sphinx Medal of Excellence, McGill is a leading soloist, recitalist, and chamber and orchestral musician.

Demarre McGill, CCM's new Associate Professor of Flute. Photography by Denver Rispel.

Photo by Denver Rispel.

At age 15, he appeared as a soloist with the Chicago Symphony and he has since appeared as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Seattle, Pittsburgh, Dallas, San Diego and Baltimore symphony orchestras. In 2018 he performed and presented master classes in South Africa, Korea and Japan. That same year, he was soloist with the New York Youth Symphony at Carnegie Hall and he performed with the Cathedral Choral Society at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC in a May 20thprogram entitled “Bernstein the Humanitarian.”

Now principal flute of the Seattle Symphony, McGill previously served as principal flute of the Dallas Symphony, San Diego Symphony, Florida Orchestra and Santa Fe Opera Orchestra. He recently served as acting principal flute of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and earlier with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

A founding member of The Myriad Trio, and former member of Chamber Music Society Two, McGill has participated in the Aspen, Santa Fe, Marlboro, Seattle and Stellenbosch chamber music festivals, to name a few. He is the co-founder of The Art of Élan and, along with clarinetist Anthony McGill and pianist Michael McHale, founded the McGill/McHale Trio in 2014. The trio’s first CD, Portraits, was released in August 2017 to rave reviews.

His media credits include appearances on PBS’s Live from Lincoln Center, A&E Network’s The Gifted Ones and NBC’s Today Show and Nightly News. McGill also appeared on Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood with his brother when they were teenagers.

A native of Chicago, McGill began studying the flute at age seven and attended the Merit School of Music. In the years that followed, he studied with Susan Levitin before leaving Chicago. He received his Bachelor’s degree from The Curtis Institute of Music and a Master’s degree at The Juilliard School.

Dean Romanstein thanked search committee members James Bunte (chair), Ron Aufmann, Mark Ostoich, Sandra Rivers and Heather Verbeck for their work on finding CCM’s new Associate Professor of Flute.

Please join us in congratulating Demarre McGill on his new appointment!

CCM News Faculty Fanfare

CCM Faculty Member Heather Verbeck Honors Legacy of Jack Wellbaum in Concert

CCM Professor Heather Verbeck.

CCM Professor Heather Verbeck.

CCM faculty member Heather Verbeck commemorates the legacy of her former instructor, late CCM faculty member Jack Wellbaum, in a new work for piccolo and piano composed by internationally acclaimed flutist Timothy Hagen. Verbeck will perform the Cincinnati premier of In a Yellow Wood during her faculty artist recital on Thursday, September 28.

Wellbaum had a legendary Cincinnati presence as a musician, arts administrator and teacher. He graduated from the Cincinnati College of Music in 1948 and began his tenure with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in 1950 as its principal piccolo player — a position he held for 38 years. Wellbaum also worked as the CSO’s personnel manager from 1972-1990.

Jack Wellbaum taught at CCM from 1960 until his retirement in 2008.

In 1960, after his alma mater merged with the Conservatory of Music to become the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, Wellbaum began teaching flute and piccolo at CCM. He instituted a weekly piccolo class on Monday nights, which continued through his retirement in 2008. Wellbaum passed away in December 2011, at the age of 89.

Now Verbeck, who once sat in Wellbaum’s weekly piccolo class, proudly teaches it.

“Those who knew Jack Wellbaum understood him to be a straightforward man of great character and integrity, someone you could depend on for steadfast friendship and honest but gentle counsel,” Verbeck says.

“He was a treasured mentor and colleague to me and to many others. His piccolo playing, like his teaching style, was a thing of beauty — refined but uncomplicated. The successes of his many past pupils, who were inspired to play better and to work harder in his presence, stand as evidence of his profound influence.”

Wellbaum included his sage and succinct advice as commentary in Orchestral Excerpts for Piccolo, a resource of 36 common orchestral piccolo audition excerpts.

With the permission of Wellbaum’s family, Verbeck organized a consortium of 42 commissioners to raise the funds for In A Yellow Wood, composed by Timothy Hagen. The consortium includes Wellbaum’s former students, colleagues from his time at the CSO, piccolo makers and other professional musicians who recognize the contributions Wellbaum made to the arts world.

“Like many other professional flutists, I have found Jack Wellbaum’s Orchestral Excerpts for Piccolo to be an indispensable resource, full of generous wisdom,” wrote Hagen.

“In writing this piece, I have found myself inspired to be the best composer I could be and, more importantly, the best person I could be….I hope In a Yellow Wood brings joy to all those who play and hear it and keeps alive the legacy of Jack Wellbaum, a truly marvelous human being.”

In a Yellow Wood is a single-movement, 10-minute piece for piccolo and piano. Verbeck performed the piece at the National Flute Association’s Annual Convention in August. She will give the Cincinnati premier of the new work during her faculty artist recital at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 28 in CCM’s Watson Recital Hall.

“This Commissioning Project was inspired by a desire to continue to celebrate the legacy of Jack Wellbaum,” Verbeck says. “Seeing this project come to fruition has been a career highlight for me. It is my hope to introduce future generations of piccolo players to Mr. Wellbaum through this new work.”

CCM News Faculty Fanfare
Demarre McGill

Acclaimed Musician Demarre McGill Joins CCM Faculty as Visiting Assistant Professor of Flute

Demarre McGill

CCM Interim Dean bruce d. mcclung has announced the appointment of lauded flutist Demarre McGill as Visiting Assistant Professor of Flute. Winner of the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, McGill is a leading soloist, recitalist, and chamber and orchestral musician.

A native of Chicago, McGill began playing the flute at age seven. He attended Chicago’s Merit School and was a member of the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra. At age 15, he appeared as a soloist with the Chicago Symphony.

McGill received a Bachelor of Music degree from the Curtis Institute of Music where he studied with Julius Baker and Jeffrey Khaner. He continued his studies with Baker at The Juilliard School, where he received a Master of Music degree.

McGill has appeared as a soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony, Dallas Symphony, San Diego Symphony and Baltimore Symphony.

In September 2017, McGill will return as principal flute of the Seattle Symphony. He previously served as principal flute of the Dallas Symphony, San Diego Symphony, Florida Orchestra and Santa Fe Opera Orchestra. He recently served as acting principal flute of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra.

As a chamber musician, McGill is a founding member of The Myriad Trio and is a former member of Chamber Music Society Two. He has participated in the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, Music@Menlo, Marlboro Music, La Jolla Music Festival, Seattle Chamber Music Festival and Stellenbosch Chamber Music Festival in South Africa, among others.

McGill is the co-founder and artistic director of the chamber music organization Art of Élan. In 2014, he founded the McGill/McHale Trio with clarinetist Anthony McGill and pianist Michael McHale. The trio’s first CD, Portraits, was released by Cedille Records on August 11.

Media credits include appearances on PBS’s Live from Lincoln Center, A&E Network’s The Gifted Ones and NBC’s Today Show and Nightly News. McGill also appeared on Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood with his brother when they were teenagers.

Please join us in welcoming Professor McGill to the CCM family!

Learn more about CCM’s illustrious faculty by visiting ccm.uc.edu/about/villagenews/faculty.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare
Alumna Molly Barth. Photo by Alyson Levy.

CCM Alumni Featured in Recently Released ‘Thorn’ album

Alumna Molly Barth (AD Flute Performance, 2000) recently released a CD that includes performances from fellow CCM alumni Matt Albert (AD Violin Performance, 2000) and Stuart Gerber (MM Percussion Performance, 1998; DMA Percussion Performance, 2003). The new record, thorn, is a collection of works by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer David Lang and was released on the Cantaloupe Music record label.

The Grammy Award-winning flutist is a Cantaloupe artist and has established herself as one of the leading performers of contemporary music for flute. Lang approached Barth to collaborate on thorn after hearing her perform. The record is named after one of Lang’s pieces for unaccompanied flute, which is also featured on the album.

“David Lang’s music is incredibly focused,” Barth says. “Each of his pieces has a very specific goal in mind, and he is meticulous in the manner in which he expresses his musical intent for each work. David approached me to collaborate on this album after hearing two of my performances of thorn for solo flute. He was captivated by the energy embodied in these performances and was intrigued enough to invite me to record many of his chamber works.”

Also featured on the new CD are violinist Matt Albert and percussionist Stuart Gerber. Albert formerly served as the director of chamber music at the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University and is currently the chair of the Department of Chamber Music at the University of Michigan School of Music. Gerber regularly performs around the world as a soloist and is an Associate Professor of Percussion at Georgia State University.

Barth is one of the founding members of new music sextet eighth blackbird, which she performed with from 1996 to 2006. Currently, Barth is part of Duo Damiana with guitarist Dieter Hennings. The duo’s forthcoming CD on Innova Recordings will feature a work by CCM composition professor Michael Fiday.

Barth also co-founded the Beta Collide New Music Project, which creates interdisciplinary art as well as music-only performances and recordings. She is the flutist in the Oregon Wind Quintet and is an Associate Professor of Flute at the University of Oregon.

“I perform solo, chamber, and orchestral music spanning several centuries. All music requires the same diligence in practice and attention to detail, and I approach it all in pretty much the same manner. Musical intent of each note, intricacies of phrasing, and knowledge of each performers’ musical role are equally relevant in preparation and performance,” Barth says.

In a review of thorn for The Log Journal, Steve Smith writes, “What emerges is a varied yet consistent overview of Lang’s chamber-music activities… The performances, by Barth and a small host of excellent associates (including fellow former blackbird Matt Albert on violin), strike just the right balance between nervous tension and technical security.”

Visit the Cantaloupe Music’s website for information on how to preview or purchase thorn.

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Story by CCM graduate student Alexandra Doyle

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The Cohen Family Studio Theater at CCM.

Student Compositions Showcased in CCM’s “A View from the Edge” Recital

The University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music offers a few recitals each semester called “A View from the Edge.” These free concerts showcase original works of student composers and give audiences a look over the precipice of current compositional techniques.

The first of this season’s student composition recitals is at 8 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 26 in CCM’s Cohen Family Studio Theater. The concert program includes a set of three songs for soprano and piano inspired by the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, a freshman composer’s first piano sonata and How I Lost My Voice, a piece for flute and guitar that a student wrote in response to the Nov. 13, 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris.

Daniel Harrison

Daniel Harrison.

Daniel Harrison, a third-year doctoral candidate studying music composition, is one of the student coordinators for this installment of “A View from the Edge.” CCM graduate student Alexandra Doyle got in touch with Harrison to get a preview of the upcoming recital.

Can you tell me a bit about “A View from the Edge” and the goals of these recitals?
The “View From The Edge” series was created as a way to showcase the newest compositions from the students in the CCM composition studio. At these concerts, you will hear premieres of chamber music, which range from solos to small ensembles and occasionally works that incorporate electronics. One of the outstanding characteristics of our composition studio is how diverse all of our compositional voices are; everyone has something different to say and their own way of saying it.

What’s it like to work with student performers to hone your pieces? Have you found that you make a significant amount of changes after rehearsals have begun?
Working with other students is great! I love it when there is a sense that we, as a team, are collaborating together to create an experience for a concert-goer. As a composer, I view my role in this as only a third of the equation; the audience and performer make up the other two thirds. I have gotten advice from performers that has led to some significant revisions, both in terms of idiomatic treatment of the instruments and notional choices.

Which three pieces on the program stand out to you, and why?
One of the three pieces on the concert that I’m really looking forward to hearing is Phillip Robert‘s Her em Iteru, which is a set of three songs for soprano and piano based on texts found in the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead. Another is our incoming freshman composer Maksym Mahlay‘s first piano sonata, which looks like a fiery and virtuosic piece for solo piano. It’s also worth noting that the composer himself will be performing the piece. Lastly, my piece for flute and guitar, How I Lost My Voice, will be premiered at the recital. This piece attempts to capture the feeling of not being able to express oneself vocally and contains extended techniques in the flute and guitar that give the illusion of a voice becoming hoarse and transparent.

Did a personal experience inspire your work, How I Lost My Voice?
While I was composing this piece, the Nov. 13, 2015 Paris attacks occurred. After the initial shock, I vividly recall feeling this wave of absolute hopelessness. What could I do? As someone whose profession is to write music, in a country thousands of miles away and separated from France by an ocean, ‘not much’ is as a gross understatement. This event radically refocused my perspective and reframed the project I was working on for a reading session, which was a simple, short piece for flute and guitar.

I began asking what purpose music served in response to tragedy. I imagined that even if I screamed until I lost my voice, there was nothing that I could do to undo what happened. My only recourse was to respond through music well after the fact.

What should people who haven’t experienced much new music expect if they come to “A View from the Edge”?
I would come in to these concerts with an open mind. Our composition studio is filled with students who have different aesthetics. No two recitals will offer the same sounds. One bit of advice that I would offer to someone who is looking to experience a new music concert for the first time is to listen to the music in the same way one would taste a new dish­ – just be open to the experience!

The first “A View from the Edge” recital is at 8 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 26 in CCM’s Cohen Family Studio Theater. Composition students will have another opportunity to showcase their new works in the second concert at 8 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 31 in Patricia Corbett Theater.

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Story by CCM graduate student Alexandra Doyle

CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Flute Students and Alumni Achieve Clean Sweep at North Carolina Flute Competition

We are thrilled to report that current and former CCM students took all three top prizes at the inaugural Artist Competition held by the Raleigh Area Flute Association (RAFA)! The competition took place on Nov. 14, 2015, during the organization’s annual Flute Fair in Raleigh, North Carolina.

All three winners are current or former students of famed performer and CCM faculty member Randolph Bowman:

  • First Place: Matthew Ross. Ross is a current master of music student at CCM. For winning the competition, he received a $1,000 cash prize and will be invited to perform a full recital during RAFA’s 2016–17 season.
  • Second Place: Lindsay Leach-Sparks. Sparks, who currently resides in Chapel Hill, N.C., is a 2012 graduate of CCM, earning her Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) degree. She was awarded a $500 prize for finishing second.
  • Third Place: Jennifer Gosack. Gosack is currently pursuing her DMA at CCM; she also previously earned a 2011 Artist Diploma (AD) and 2010 MM from the college. For her third-place finish, she won a $250 cash prize.
From left to right, RAFA President Rosene Rohrer, Jennifer M. Gosack (3rd place winner), Matthew Ross (1st place winner), Lindsay Leach-Sparks (2nd place winner), and Artistic Competition Coordinator Catherine LeGrand. Photo by Darryl Kessler/Riverview Photography.

From left to right, RAFA President Rosene Rohrer, Jennifer M. Gosack (3rd place winner), Matthew Ross (1st place winner), Lindsay Leach-Sparks (2nd place winner), and Artistic Competition Coordinator Catherine LeGrand. Photo by Darryl Kessler/Riverview Photography.

About the RAFA
RAFA, formerly the Raleigh Area Flute Association, is a nonprofit corporation founded in 1985. In addition to our extensive family of teachers and students, we have several flute choirs that perform throughout the Raleigh and Greater Triangle Areas. Our parent organization, the Raleigh Flute Choir, is home to some of the best flutists in Raleigh and beyond, but RAFA with its membership roster of over 300 flutists encourages everyone to strive for their best flute playing.

RAFA presents workshops, masterclasses, and competitions all year, but our favorite event is our annual Flute Fair, held in mid-fall, where all our members gather together for presentations, guest artists, recitals, and flute-related vendors all in one! We support activities through membership dues and contributions from both individuals and businesses throughout the area as well as nationwide.

The mission of the Raleigh Area Flute Association is to:

  • promote flute playing in the Raleigh area,
  • promote the enjoyment and appreciation of the flute,
  • assist members in achieving musical excellence, and
  • provide scholarships for worthy students.

Join us in congratulating these current and former students on their achievements!

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CCM Presents Acclaimed Flutist Molly Alicia Barth and Guitarist Dieter Hennings In Concert This Week

CCM’s Guest Artist Series proudly presents Grammy Award-winning flutist (and CCM alumna) Molly Alicia Barth and acclaimed guitarist Dieter Hennings in concert at 8 p.m. this Thursday, Jan. 24, in the Cohen Family Studio Theater. Tickets to this performance are free. Reservations are not required.

Barth and Hennings’ Jan. 24 performance is scheduled to include a performance of CCM Associate Professor of Composition Michael Fiday‘s Five Haiku for alto flute and guitar, along with Philippe Hurel’s Loops, Juan Trigos’ From Partita, André Jolivet’s Ascèses, Herbet Vazquez’s El jardín del pasaje púrpura, David Lang’s Vent, Jean Micahel Damase’s Quatre Facettes and Toru Takemitsu’s Toward the Sea.

Grammy Award-winning flutist Molly Alicia Barth.

Grammy Award-winning flutist Molly Alicia Barth.

About Molly Alicia Barth
Described as “ferociously talented” by The Oregonian, Grammy-Award winning flutist Molly Alicia Barth is an active solo, chamber and orchestral musician, specializing in the music of today. As a founding member of the new music sextet eighth blackbird, Barth toured extensively throughout the world, recorded four CDs with Cedille Records, won a 2008 Grammy (“Best Chamber Music Performance”) and was granted the 2000 Naumburg Chamber Music Award, first prize at the 1998 Concert Artists Guild International Competition, the 1998/2000/2002 CMA/ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming, first prize at the 1997 Coleman Chamber Music Competition and first prize at the 1996 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition.

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CCM Continues American Voices Series with Flute-tastic Program on Jan. 27

The CCM Philharmonia continues to pay tribute to the prolific and talented composers who were born in or immigrated to America with “American Voices XIV: Flute-tastic!” at 8 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 27. The concert will feature CCM’s own Brad Garner, professor of flute, and guest conductor Apo Hsu.

CCM News

CCM Announces Winter 2012 Calendar of Major Events

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) presents nearly 1,000 public events throughout the year and offers free admission to many of its performances. Unless otherwise indicated, all events listed here take place on the CCM campus and are free. Some events require paid admission; please see individual event information for details and ordering information.

Tickets and Additional Information:
Please visit ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice or contact the CCM Box Office at 513-556-4183.

Parking:
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit ccm.uc.edu for directions.

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