CCM Village at night

CCM E-Media professor and student help UC Emeriti Center launch new website

CCM Village at night

The University of Cincinnati Emeriti Association and Center, headed by College-Conservatory of Music E-Media Professor Peter DePietro, unveiled a new website in April that showcases the work of recent graduate Jonathan Kilberg (BFA E-Media, ’20). As the center’s multimedia intern, Kilberg’s work included web design/development, user experience design, videography and audio production — a grouping of disciplines that are unique to CCM’s E-Media program.

Assistant Professor of E-Media Peter DePietro.

Peter DePietro.

DePietro is the first non-interim executive director of the Emeriti Center, which advocates for the interests of emeriti, provides intellectual and social opportunities and strengthens ties between emeriti and the university, local, national and international communities. The new website includes videos from the Center’s YouTube channel as well as helpful resources for the university’s retired faculty members.

Since having a major role in the Center, DePietro has worked on creating connections between UC and community leaders as well as connecting deans from different colleges across campus. He is also focused on growth and expanding membership. At CCM he continues to educate his students through experience-based learning, which is why he recruited a student to help build the Center’s new website. DePietro enlisted the help of Kilberg because he believes that engaging students in practical learning is important.

“It was an amazing opportunity to be able to work for the Center,” Kilberg says. “I jumped at the opportunity. Every single member is supportive and kind and sociable. It was amazing to meet all these people from campus life and beyond campus life.”

Creating the UC Emeriti website was no small feat. The task required both Kilberg and DePietro to take classes and tests in order to train on the university’s web content management system and to meet the standards of UC’s Digital Communications office. In addition to the website, Kilberg and DePietro created a YouTube channel with original video content. The crown jewel of the YouTube channel is the EmeriTALKS series which Kilberg noted as one of the best parts of working on this project. The EmeriTALKS videos include a joint-venture between the Center and CCM, featuring the leadership of Cincinnati’s Playhouse in the Park, and another featuring former UC President Nancy Zimpher.

As an E-Media student at CCM, Kilberg has enjoyed multiple opportunities to participate in hands on learning experiences. In October 2019, Kilberg traveled to Germany and Poland with CCM E-Media Professor Hagit Limor’s multi-disciplinary Media Topics class. The group of 15 students set out to create “Hope After Hate,” an immersive play and virtual reality experience that shares Limor’s father’s experience during the Holocaust with lessons to inspire action against future acts of hatred.

CCM’s BFA E-Media program encompasses the integrated media arts of film and digital cinema, television and broadcast media news, audio production and new media design. Students are given the opportunity to study in the track of their choosing, including Broadcast and Media Production, Multimedia Production and Film and Television Production. Internships are a key part of the curriculum and take advantage of the professional resources in Cincinnati and other areas across the country. With its emphasis on experiential learning, students acquire the hands-on skills and a digital portfolio necessary to transition successfully into the professional world.

Kilberg plans on going into the film industry and feels that one of the biggest skills E-Media has taught him is how to effectively work with a team. “E-Media pushed me to work with other people, which is so necessary in the field that I want to go in. The program taught me the importance of working as a team.”

“The professors are talented and they work hard at creating community,” Kilberg says. “They also offer great resources and there is support from the alumni of E-Media. Going forward they are going to continue to do an amazing job preparing students.”


Story by CCM Graduate Student Kelly Barefield

Featured image at top: An aerial view of CCM Village. Photo/Jay Yocis

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Student-Created Documentary ‘The Fifth Mode’ Airs on Cincinnati’s CET Tonight

In early 2017, a team of UC Engineering students — one of only 27 teams to make the cut — participated in Elon Musk’s SpaceX Hyperloop Competition in Hawthorne, California. CCM E-Media students in UC’s Production Master Class captured their work in a new documentary The Fifth Mode, which airs at 10 p.m. tonight, June 26, 2019, on Cincinnati’s PBS station, CET.

The UC Hyperloop team featured in “The Fifth Mode.”

The concept of the Hyperloop is similar to the pneumatic tubes used at drive-through banks and pharmacies, although these trains will only travel horizontally. Passengers will occupy a car that travels through an enclosed tube, hovering inside of it due to magnetic repulsion. Theoretically, this train could travel at speeds upwards of 700 miles per hour, reducing a commute between Cincinnati and New York to under an hour, and doing so significantly more cheaply than current airfare prices. The Hyperloop competition encourages young engineers and designers to attempt to create this train system. To read more about the Hyperloop competition and UC’s participation, check out this UC Magazine article.

The 30-minute documentary about UC’s journey to the competition was created by CCM E-Media students in the Production Master Class, supervised by CCM professor and E-Media division head Kevin Burke and Emmy Award-winning producer Brian Leitten (BFA E-Media, 2001).

E-Media students filming “The Fifth Mode.” Left to Right: Kelsey Keiser, Laura Walters, Ben Vanden Eynden and Matt Harris.

Twenty-five students worked as editors, producers, music supervisors, audio mixers and graphic designers to create The Fifth Mode, including student producer Laura Walters, as well as Nate Carpenter, David Carrero, Jesse Circelli, La’nice Davis, Jason Gerz, Matt Harris, Kelsey Keiser, Nile Ross, Tanner Segbers, Max Vanden Eynden, Ben Vanden Eynden, Mitch Webb (who was also part of the Hyperloop team) and Becca Wheelen. All of these students completed their bachelor’s degrees in E-Media at CCM in Spring 2018.

UC’s Production Master Class is an experience-based learning initiative that provides students with the opportunity to work alongside faculty and professionals on film and TV productions designed for regional, national and international distribution. Since its inception in 2012, the class has completed five documentaries, which have all aired on television in the US, Canada, Italy, France and Russia and have appeared in film festivals on five continents. In April 2019, The Fifth Mode enjoyed a screening at the Canton Film Festival.

The Fifth Mode will air at 10 p.m. on Wednesday, June 26, as well as 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 30 and 10:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 17. Visit the CET website for more information.

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Story by CCM Graduate Student Alexandra Doyle

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A picture of CCM faculty member Donald Hancock holding his Emmy Award.

Emmy Award-Winning Producer Donald Hancock is Named Assistant Professor of Film and Television Production at CCM

CCM Dean Stanley E. Romanstein has announced the appointment of Donald Hancock to the position of Assistant Professor of Film and Television Production in CCM’s Division of E-Media. Hancock joined CCM’s faculty as an adjunct in 2012. His new appointment will begin on Aug. 15, 2019.

A picture of CCM faculty member Donald Hancock holding his Emmy Award.

Hancock is an Emmy Award-winning producer, professor and an active member of the media community. He has an MA in Film and Television from Savannah College of Art and Design and a BFA in E-Media from CCM. Hancock currently works as a producer at CET, Cincinnati’s PBS Member Station. He has produced “The Art Show,” CET’s weekly art magazine program, since 2013. He also produces content for a variety of partners with CET, including ArtsWave and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.

Hancock won a Regional Emmy Award for “Cincinnati’s Music Hall: The Next Movement,” a 60-minute documentary that he co-wrote, produced and shot. The documentary details the historic $150 million renovation of Cincinnati’s National Historic Landmark. Watch a promotional spot for the documentary below.

In 2013, Hancock was chosen as one of 25 producers from around the country to participate in the PBS/CPB Producer’s Academy, whose goal is to engage a talented pool of diverse producers in public broadcasting. Hancock has also partnered with WGBH and PBS to produce content around national programming including “Finding Your Roots,” “American Experience” and “Downton Abbey.”

For the past seven years, Hancock has been an adjunct professor at CCM, teaching Digital Video and Integrated Media Production courses to sophomore and junior-level students. In his spare time, he serves on the Executive Board for the UC Center for Film and Media Studies, as well as the community advisory board at Elementz Urban Arts Center. He is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists, a member of the Broadcast Education Association and volunteers as a Big Brother in the Big Brother Big Sisters Program.

Dean Romanstein thanked search committee members Kevin Burke (chair), Peter DePietroJohn HebbelerTondra Holt and Hagit Limor for their work on finding CCM’s new Assistant Professor of Film and Television Production.

Please join us in congratulating Donald Hancock on his new appointment!

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CCM 48-Hour Film Festival Celebrates Student Creators

On Friday, Oct. 26, 2018, CCM kicked off its 5th annual university-wide 48-Hour Film Festival, produced by Richard Hess, Chair of the CCM Acting Department. This year’s festival attracted 90 participating students from across multiple UC colleges who came together in one weekend to create six short films.

Participants included students from the CCM Acting Department, as well as students from CCM’s Electronic Media, Musical Theatre, Commercial Music Production and Theatre Design and Production programs. The festival also welcomed student participants from other UC majors including: Communication, English Literature, Fine Arts, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Industrial Design, Computer Science and more.

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“The festival challenges students to quickly solve problems and the fast turnaround of the project helped eliminate the second-guessing often involved in creative work,” says Hess. “The 48-Hour Film Festival is a perfect chance to say, ‘Yes, yes, yes! With your creativity, a space, a camera and some people interested in storytelling, you can make a beautiful short film together in a short period of time and that’s amazing!”

Students created six films for this year’s festival: The Medium’s Assistant, Woodrow, True Accurate Honest Portrayals of Stories that Actually Happened to People, The Sparkling, Ononta Avenue, and Ghost Getters. The films were screened in a packed house on Sunday, Oct. 28 in the Main Street Cinema at UC’s Tangeman University Center.

Each year the festival offers awards to the students involved in the audience’s favorite films. This year’s Audience Awards go to:

  • Outstanding Film – Woodrow, produced by Audrey Schlembach
  • Outstanding Direction – Briley Oakley (The Medium’s Assistant)
  • Outstanding Cinematography – Lindsey Ballou (Ononta Avenue)
  • Outstanding Editing – Eli Lucas (Ononta Avenue)
  • Outstanding Writing – Abby Palen, Jabari Carter, Ellie Fangman (Woodrow)
  • Outstanding Writing – Donovan Williams, Kayla Temshiv, Lucas Prizant (Ghost Getters)
  • Outstanding Composition – Duncan Weinland  (Ghost Getters)
  • Outstanding Production Design – Gabriella DiVincenzo (The Medium’s Assistant)
  • Outstanding Performance by an Actor – Jabari Carter (Woodrow)
  • Outstanding Performance by an Actress – Paige Jordan (The Medium’s Assistant)
  • Outstanding Performance by a Featured Actor – Jack Steiner (Ghost Getters)
  • Outstanding Performance by a Featured Actress – Kristina Steinmetz (Woodrow)
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UC Students Invited to Participate in CCM’s 48-hour Film Festival

CCM Acting presents the fifth annual 48-Hour Film Festival on Oct. 26-28, 2018. Open to all UC students; apply by Oct. 22 to participate.

The 48-Hour Film Festival at CCM challenges teams of UC students to create short films over a single weekend. Any UC student is invited to participate in the fifth annual festival, which will be held on Oct. 26-28, 2018.

Last year’s 48-Hour Film Festival had more than 100 UC student participants including Acting, Biology, Musical Theatre, Computer Science, Electronic Media, Journalism, International Affairs and English Literature majors.

Students must submit an application to CCM Acting professor and Department Chair Richard E. Hess by 5 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 22 to participate. All students who apply will be placed on a team.

“From experienced filmmakers to first-time novices, and serious film lovers to curious dabblers, there is room for everyone on a team,” Hess says. “Any UC student who applies is placed on a team, no experience necessary.”

The clock starts ticking at 7 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 26 when participants are randomly assigned to teams of eight to ten students each. The teams are each given a prop, a line of dialogue and a theme that they must use to create a short film that is five to seven minutes long.

The festival culminates at 7 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 28 in a free public screening of each team’s film at UC’s MainStreet Cinema in the Tangeman University Center.

“What are you waiting for?,” Hess asks. “Join the fun.” Application and screening event information is below.
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How to Participate
Send your application and any questions to CCM Acting Chair Richard E. Hess at hessre@uc.edu. Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018

Your application must include your name, college and year of study, e-mail contact, mobile contact and area of interest for the festival.

Participants will be randomly divided into teams based on what their areas of interest to ensure that various skill sets are represented in each team. Areas of interest include:

  • Director of Photography
  • Director
  • First Assistant Director
  • Editor
  • Producer
  • Grip
  • Audio
  • Composer
  • Lead Writer
  • Actor
  • Production Design
  • Make-Up Design
  • Costume Design
  • Prop Design

Short-Film Screening Time
7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28

Location
MainStreet Cinema, Tangeman University Center
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Free, reservations are not required.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

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CCM E-Media and Acting students win NATAS Student Production Award

The Ohio Valley Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) awarded a team of CCM Electronic Media and Acting students the 2018 Regional Student Production Award for Best Long Form – Fiction for a film they created in class. The students competed in the College/University category, which includes Ohio University, Xavier University, Asbury University and other schools in the Ohio Valley area.

Integration Episode 1: The Update is a science-fiction drama that was created in the Spring 2018 Capstone Film course (EMED 4003), taught by Electronic Media Division Head Kevin Burke. The professor is no stranger to having his students’ work honored at prestigious events and film festivals.

“Projects produced in the class have won multiple Student Emmy Awards at both the regional and national levels, have been entered and won awards in a number of film festivals and have won in a variety of student production competitions,” Burke says.

Integration Episode 1: The Update is set in a future where computers are even more ubiquitous than they are today. A charismatic but less-than-ethical CEO instructs one of his employees, an unsuspecting computer programmer, to create a dramatic software update to one of the company’s programs. The 22-minute film follows the consequences of this update.

Nine E-Media students and four Acting students participated in creating the film, with assistance from Burke and CCM Acting professor Bob Pavlovich. The E-Media students are Matthew Harris, Austin Baker, Javert Valbarr, Nile Ross-Watson, Jared Bailey, Connor Smith, Caleb Smiley, Jamila Flowers and Jesse Circelli. The Acting students in the film are Isaac Hickox-Young, Sarah Durham, Landon Hawkins and Briley Oakley.

“I think Matt Harris did a great job writing, directing and editing the film. Austin Baker’s cinematography, Caleb Smiley’s lighting, the sound design by Connor Smith and visual effects by Javert Albarr all helped the film receive recognition by the Student Emmy Awards,” Burke says.

However, Burke is quick to point out that this film involved the work of both E-Media and Acting students. He refers to the project as a “CCM Collaborative Film.”

“I believe the outstanding performances by the CCM Acting students really set the film apart from the other entries,” Burke adds. “The talent, range and discipline of these students allow the audience to suspend their disbelief, care about the fictional characters and buy into the premise of the film.”

Producer Nile Ross-Watson fondly remembers the moment that he and fellow students decided to work on a science-fiction film, a challenging genre that he thinks no other E-Media students have attempted before for their final projects.

“I remember sitting with Matthew and Austin, thinking of what we were going to do for our final project,” he shares. “After some time, we came up with the idea of a Sci-Fi project! We were instantly bouncing ideas back and forth. One of the big ideas that we knew we wanted to do was have a color scheme throughout the project. Matthew looks at me and says, ‘What’s a good color that says futuristic?’ I instantly said, ‘Teal.’ From there, we had a good idea of what our project was going to look like.”

The students approached this class project as they would approach any professional project, says Ross-Watson. They spent many days studying all aspects of the film until they were satisfied with the final product. CCM’s E-Media program emphasizes hands-on learning so students will have plenty of experience and preparation for their future careers. Alumni from CCM E-Media have recently been recognized at the Academy Awards, the 2018 Sundance Film Festival and the Grammy Awards.

Learn more about CCM E-Media at ccm.uc.edu/emedia.

About the Ohio Valley Chapter
The Ohio Valley Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences was established in 1962. It is dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of television and the promotion of creative leadership for artistic, educational and technical achievements within the television industry. The Chapter presents the prestigious and coveted Emmy® Award to television professionals in thirteen markets in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, honors industry trailblazers with the Silver and Gold Circle and makes scholarships available to students at colleges and universities throughout the region.

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Story by CCM Graduate Student Alexandra Doyle

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Binge watch for summer credit at CCM. Fine Arts Elective

CCM Summer Electives Bring Arts Experiences to All

Do you need to fulfill your fine arts credits? Have you always wanted to learn to dance but couldn’t get over the stage fright? Do you have free time this summer to jam with a virtual band on your laptop or study the music of The Beatles, all while earning class credit?

This summer, you can complete your arts elective requirements on campus or online. UC’s College-Conservatory of Music offers more than 20 different general studies and fine arts elective courses during six different sessions this summer. These credit-granting courses cover a wide range of topics and are open to UC and non-UC students alike!

Learn the basics of modern dance in on campus or online classes designed for beginners or experienced dancers. Film a digital video, create your own podcast or learn about the evolution of Japanese Pop, anime and video game music in movie and media appreciation courses.

CCM’s music appreciation courses cover the music of Prince, The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Talking Heads and more.  You can also turn your laptop into a musical instrument and jam with a virtual band in music performance classes.

On-Campus and Online arts courses are just a click away: visit ccm.uc.edu/summerarts to learn more!

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CCM 48-Hour Film Festival Celebrates Fourth Year

Audience members filled UC's MainStreet Cinema to watch original, student-created short films during CCM's 48-Hour Film Festival.

Audience members filled UC’s MainStreet Cinema to watch original, student-created short films during CCM’s 48-Hour Film Festival.

On Friday, Nov. 17, 2017, the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music kicked off its fourth annual university-wide 48-Hour Film Festival, spearheaded by Richard Hess, Chair of the CCM Acting Department. This year’s festival attracted 100 participating students from across multiple UC colleges who came together in one weekend to create eight short films.

Participants included 45 students from the CCM Acting department, as well as students from CCM’s Electronic Media, Musical Theatre, and Theatre Design and Production programs. The festival also welcomed student participants from other areas of UC, including International Affairs, Biology, English Literature, Aerospace Engineering and more.

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The festival challenges students to quickly solve problems and the fast turnaround of the project helps eliminate the second-guessing often involved in creative work, says Hess. “There is so much that works against creativity at a large and busy school,” Hess adds. “The 48-Hour Film Festival is a perfect chance to say, ‘Yes, yes, yes!’”

“With your creativity, a space, a camera and some people interested in storytelling, you can make a beautiful short film together in a short period of time, and that’s glorious!”

Participants were divided into eight teams and were each required to incorporate a NASA T-shirt, a mini mirrored disco-ball ornament and the phrase “I was hoping you’d say that” into their films. Each unique film lasts approximately seven to eight minutes in length. From there, the potential for creativity is limitless.

In the event’s first year, filmmaker and actor Fraser Kershaw launched the festival with a screening of his documentary, Behind the Water. For the next 48-Hour Film Festival, CCM welcomed six film and theatre students from Kenyatta University in Nairobi, Kenya.

This year, CCM Musical Theatre alumnus Mickey Fisher, who worked on the CBS show Extant and is currently working on the upcoming NBC show Reverie, shared a virtual masterclass with participants on the making of short films.

The eight finished films in this year’s CCM 48-Hour Film Festival were screened at a packed house on Sunday, Nov. 19 in the MainStreet Cinema at UC’s Tangeman University Center.

Visit the festival website to watch the films from the 2017 CCM 48-Hour Film Festival.

Each year the festival offers awards to the students involved in the audience’s favorite films. This year’s Audience Awards go to:

OUTSTANDING DIRECTION
Olivia Passafiume, Where We Left Off

OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY
David Lehn, Where We Left Off

OUTSTANDING EDITING
Lindsey Ballou, Umpha Koroma and Darius Dudley, Randy the Reference Guy

OUTSTANDING WRITING
Sarah Durham, Where We Left Off

OUTSTANDING ANIMATION AND GRAPHICS
Devon Whalen, Where We Left Off

OUTSTANDING COMPOSITION/SOUND DESIGN
Peter Glassmeyer and Steven Rimke, In and Out

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR
Cameron Nalley, Where We Left Off

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS
Madeleine Page-Schmit, Where We Left Off

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTOR
Reid Robison, Going Up?

OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEATURED ACTRESS
Jenny Yue Shi, Randy the Reference Guy

OUTSTANDING FILM
Where We Left Off
Produced by
Kellie Bartle & Sarah Durham

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CCM Alumni Create Music Score for New Feature Film ‘Novitiate’

There is a gap for potential leaders in curating classical music for the film industry, says CCM Composition alumnus Tyler Bradley Walker (DMA 2010), who recently served as music supervisor for feature film Novitiate. Walker is striving to fill that gap and enlisted the help of fellow CCM Composition alumnus Christopher Stark (MM 2007) to score the music-heavy feature film.

Novitiate, which debuted nationally on Nov. 10, is about a 17-year-old girl who trains to become a nun as the Roman Catholic Church undergoes radical changes in the early 1960s. Maggie Betts directs the film, which stars Melissa Leo, Dennis O’Hare, Dianna Agron and Margaret Qualley.

Walker says it was a huge honor to work with Betts on this almost entirely female-driven film project. Following the director’s vision for the film, Walker used art songs by composers Gabriel Fauré, Arvo Pärt and John Tavener. He studied the script and provided multiple musical options to pair with specific scenes — collecting around 150 options of art music.

“For me, using art music extensively as source material is exciting and underutilized in film,” Walker says. “Stanley Kubrick understood this to great effect but it has never entirely caught on. Thus, it was exciting to learn how Maggie was envisioning the film through a multitude of art songs and how we could incorporate them tonally.”

There are about 14 classical pieces used as source music in the movie, in addition to Tennessee Waltz by Patti Page. Walker hired Stark to write the score and maintain a cohesive musical tone throughout the film.

“The overall tone of the score, for me, is one of spiritual introspection — regardless of how one defines spiritual,” Stark says. “The movie is very carefully constructed and methodically paced so that the audience has time to self-reflect. The music really tries to help create this atmosphere.”

Stark studied the techniques of Pärt and Tavener and composed themes that used their ideas infused with his own personal style.

“The director had very specific emotions in mind for the particular scenes and characters,” Stark says. “For example, early in the film, when the young nun is falling in love with God, [Betts] asked me to create music with a sweet, child-like, yet romantic feeling — almost like how someone feels when they fall in love in high school.”

A 2017 recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship, Stark regularly composes contemporary classical music for concerts. He recently returned to CCM for a guest artist recital with New Morse Code, which performed one of Stark’s works. Novitiate marks his first foray into film.

“Film music has to enhance the dialogue and imagery on the screen, so it’s supplemental by nature — you aren’t solely responsible for the audience’s attention,” Stark says. “With concert music, you have to provide all of the drama and interest, so the music is more involved and, hopefully, attention-grabbing.”

Walker began working in the music industry shortly after he graduated and was able to “cut his teeth” in all aspects of recording engineering and production. He is a “musical sommelier” who credits his studies and experiences for giving him an objectively extensive palette of musical knowledge, which is a huge advantage in the film industry, he says.

Walker and Stark work as part of Maven Music Supervision, a creative resource focused on curating, selecting, licensing and clearing music for film, television, video games and other visual media. They first met as students at CCM.

“Tyler was one of the first people I met when I started at CCM, and we have remained really close friends ever since,” Stark says. “We both really love listening to music and watching films, and we are constantly texting about what we are watching and listening to — along with our other buddy from CCM, Matt Heim.”

Walker remembers enjoying classes taught by Robert Zierolf, who served as the head of CCM Composition, Music history and Theory and as dean of the UC Graduate School before his retirement in 2014. Since graduating, Stark has remained close with CCM Composition Professor Michael Fiday.

“I have always admired him as a composer and he was such a supportive and thoughtful teacher while I was a student at CCM,” Stark says.

“Both Tyler and I learned so much music and technique while we were students at CCM, and we’ve been able to use those skills to do really varied and interesting things since graduating.”

Hear their work in Novitiate, released by Sony Pictures ClassicsTM, now playing in theaters nation-wide. Learn more about the film at sonyclassics.com/novitiate.

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E-Media Professor’s Technology Article Wins International Award for Excellence

Assistant Professor of E-Media Peter DePietro.

Assistant Professor of E-Media Peter DePietro.

Technology is changing the social fabric of cities in Central Europe and pushing them into a new cultural renaissance, according to University of Cincinnati Electronic Media Professor Peter DePietro. His research into this renaissance was praised by the Technology, Knowledge & Society Research Network, which recently awarded DePietro an International Award for Excellence for Volume 12 of The Technology Collection for his article “Tech in Europe: Cultural Reboot.”

The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society offers the annual award for newly published research or thinking that has been recognized to be outstanding by members of the Technology, Knowledge & Society Research Network. DePietro’s winning article was selected from the ten highest-ranked articles that emerged from the peer preview process. Published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Technologies in Society, DePietro’s research compares Europe’s “cultural reboot” of today to the existential movements of the past.

“German existentialist Friedrich Nietzsche advocated for cultural rebirth in Europe,” DePietro wrote. “Europe is experiencing such a rebirth with digital media: creating artistic and social cultures that are wildly interesting and progressive and have technology integrated in them.”

His article argues that Vienna is a “hotbed” of innovative applications of digital media in art. Vienna is creating a new kind of “digital modernism” by creating things that are “different, weird and strange.” DePietro also states that Berlin is poised to become a leader in digital media in Europe by integrating it into art, commerce, education and lifestyle.

“Digital media is bringing together high society and bohemianism, in an effort to create a new economy,” DePietro wrote.

The professor has taught within the E-Media Division at UC’s College-Conservatory of Music since January 2009 and is the founding Director of Digital Innovation Lab: A New Media and Technology Incubator. He’s taught courses at UC that focus on social media, new media, interactive media, electronic game design and development, and digital storytelling and innovation.

“In my career as a scholar, tech artist, digital media leader and teacher, I have known innovation to be the all-important foundation of significant new work,” he said. “Innovation is authentic. Innovators are makers.”

DePietro is especially attuned to the effects of innovative digital media and interactive technologies on culture. He previously served as the founding Director of Digital and New Media for the Clinton Foundation in New York and the Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock. DePietro analyzed new technologies and implemented those that best communicated former President Bill Clinton’s post-Washington message, and led a team in the design and development of new media platforms to support Clinton’s initiatives, among other responsibilities. His team’s work won an international award.

DePietro is also the author of the book Transforming Education with New Media, published by Peter Lang International Publishers. He is Associate Editor of the International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society, and his research on new media and emerging technologies has been published internationally in academic journals, as well as the mainstream press.

For more information on DePietro’s research, visit www.depietro.com.

About the Technology Collection:
The Technology Collection has an acceptance rate of 58 percent and a circulation of over 64,000. This collection explores innovative theories and practices relating technology to society. The collection is cross-disciplinary in its scope, offering a meeting point for technologists with a concern for the social and social scientists with a concern for the technological. The focus is primarily, but not exclusively, on information and communications technologies. Established in 2005 and currently publishing its 13th volume, The Technology Collection is indexed by EBSCO, the Australian Research Council, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Cabell’s, Genamics Journal Seek and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. This collection offers both personal and institutional subscriptions and is published electronically and in print. For more information, please visit www.cgnetworks.org/journals/slr.

About Common Ground Research Networks:

The Technology Collection contains four among the 70 scholarly journals published by Common Ground Research Networks. Common Ground, which was founded in 1984, seeks to take the pivotal ideas and challenges at play within established disciplines and create spaces for interaction that cut horizontally across legacy knowledge structures. As a result, in addition to providing a space for publication within its catalog of journals and their associated book imprints, Common Ground encourages researchers and practitioners to meet at the annual academic conferences that it organizes around the world and then connect and share their work virtually using Scholar, Common Ground’s innovative social knowledge software. For more information, please visit www.cgnetworks.org.

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