Internationally acclaimed stage director Greg Eldridge joins CCM’s opera faculty

 

CCM Dean Stanley E. Romanstein has announced the addition of acclaimed stage director Greg Eldridge to the college’s roster of distinguished performing and media arts faculty members. Eldridge joins CCM as Associate Professor of Opera Directing.

Greg Eldridge. Photo/Andrej Uspenski

Greg Eldridge. Photo/Andrej Uspenski

Originally from Australia, Eldridge has worked on over 60 productions across eight countries at some of the world’s most famous opera houses. His work has been praised by critics for its “thoughtful and effective” staging, with “detailed characterizations and considered through-lines” a hallmark of his directing style.

A former recipient of a Bayreuth Scholarship from the Wagner Society of Victoria, Eldridge is one of only two people to have graduated from both of the world’s most prestigious opera directing programs – the Merola Program in San Francisco and the Jette Parker Young Artist Programme in the UK. He has received 5-star reviews for his work for the national opera companies of Australia, Iceland and the United Kingdom, and has been the recipient of awards including Most Outstanding Director (OperaChaser Awards, 2018) and Best Director (Broadway World Awards in Sydney, 2019).

After receiving the 2004 Premier’s Award for Excellence in the Study of Philosophy, Eldridge studied Opera Directing at The Opera Studio Melbourne in Australia and the Accademia Europea di Firenze in Italy before relocating to the United Kingdom. After serving as Trainee Resident Director at The King’s Head Theatre in London, Eldridge worked on productions including I gioielli della Madonna for Opera Holland Park, all four operas of Der Ring des Nibelungen for Longborough Festival Opera, Così fan tutte for the Landestheater Rudolstadt and he became the youngest director ever engaged by the state opera company in his hometown when he directed Ludus Danielis for Victorian Opera.

In 2013, Eldridge became the youngest – and first Australian – director to join the young artist program of The Royal Opera, Covent Garden in London. There, he worked under luminary directors including Sir David McVicar, Sir Richard Eyre, John Copley and Kasper Holten, along with conductors including Sir Antonio Pappano, Mark Wigglesworth, Alexander Joel, Nicola Luisotti, Marc Minkowski, Ivor Bolton and Gianandrea Noseda. Eldridge has also worked alongside international opera stars including Jonas Kaufmann, Sondra Radvanovsky, Rolando Villazón, Sonya Yoncheva, Sir Bryn Terfel, Anne Sofie von Otter, Sir Willard White, Dame Sarah Conolly, Nina Stemme, Roberto Alagna, Denyce Graves, Angela Gheorghiu and many others.

In 2016, The Royal Opera created a new position especially for Eldridge – the Jette Parker Associate Director – and Eldridge joined the board of Stage Directors UK (SDUK), the industry body representing and advocating for directors of live theatre throughout the United Kingdom. During his time on the board, SDUK published papers exposing inequalities in the freelance artist sector, provided evidence-based studies to government bodies and authored a major report alongside the National Theatre, RADA and The Old Vic that provided recommendations for structural changes in the way arts training organizations and theatres engage with directors from underrepresented demographics.

Eldridge has contributed articles to publications including Limelight Magazine, The Guardian UK and OperaNow Magazine, and has given guest lectures at the Victorian College of the Arts, The University of Melbourne, the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire and St John’s College Cambridge, among others. He holds an Exceptional Talent visa from the United Kingdom, and has been recognized as an Artist of Extraordinary Ability by the United States government.

“CCM’s Departments of Opera and Voice provide unparalleled training programs for singers, stage directors and opera coaches. Our students will benefit from Greg’s vast experience on the world stage,” said Romanstein. “I want to thank our search committee – which was co-chaired by Robin Guarino and Denton Yockey, and included Bill McGraw, Mary Stucky, Jim Gage and Mark Gibson – for their help identifying CCM’s next great opera faculty member.”

About CCM Opera

The Department of Opera at CCM boasts one of the most comprehensive training programs for opera singers, coaches and directors in the United States. Students at CCM work with some of the most renowned teachers and artists active in the field today.

CCM students frequently advance to the final rounds of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, which is widely considered to be the nation’s most prestigious vocal competition. In 2019, soprano Elena Villalón (BM Voice, ’19) was named a Grand Finals Winner at the competition while she was still finishing her undergraduate degree at CCM. CCM’s other recent Grand Finals Winners include Jessica Faselt (MM Voice, ’16) in 2018, Amanda Woodbury (MM Voice, ’12) and Yi Li (AD Opera, ’13) in 2014 and Thomas Richards (MM Voice, ’13) in 2013. At least two CCM singers advanced to the Upper Midwest Regional Auditions in this year’s Met National Council Auditions: artist diploma students Amber Monroe and Teresa Perrotta.

CCM singers also recently won awards in other prestigious national competitions. Jessica Faselt won a $10,000 award and Alisa Jordheim (DMA Voice, ’15; MM Voice,’ 10) won a $1,000 Encouragement award at the 2020 George London Foundation Awards Competition for young American and Canadian opera singers. Jasmine Habersham (AD Opera, 2015; MM Voice, 2013) won the silver medal in the 2020 American Traditions Vocal Competition. Edward Nelson (BM Voice, 2011; MM Voice, 2013) won first prize at the 2020 Glyndebourne Opera Cup. Perrotta also advanced to the finals of the 2020 Lotte Lenya Competition.

In addition, CCM Opera productions have received some of the National Opera Association Production Competition’s highest honors throughout the years.

CCM Opera graduates have performed on the stages of the world’s greatest opera companies, including Cincinnati Opera, Metropolitan Opera (New York), Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Royal Opera (London), La Scala (Italy) and more.

Learn more at ccm.uc.edu.


Featured image at top: A production photo of La scala di seta directed by Greg Eldridge at Royal Opera House Covent Garden London. Photo/Holly Pigot

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A photo of the entrance to the CCM Atrium on UC's campus. Photo/UC Creative + Brand.

CCM Acting Faculty, Alumni and Students Embrace Local and National Digital Theatre

A photo of the entrance to the CCM Atrium on UC's campus. Photo/UC Creative + Brand.

Cincinnati Playhouse and the One-Minute Play Festival share creative monologues and short-plays featuring CCM Acting faculty, alumni and students

The pandemic isn’t stopping theatre artists from connecting and sharing their work. Although they can’t gather on stage or perform in front of an in-person audience right now, actors and directors are creating digital spaces to share theatre online.

CCM Acting Professor Brant Russell recently participated in two digital theatre efforts through Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s Monologues of Hope series and the national One-Minute Play Festival (1MPF).

“A bunch of us have refused to allow the lack of sanctioned or safe traditional theatre methods to hamper our practice. We can’t gather, we can’t even be near each other, but the need to make work still exists, and the audiences for it are there,” Russell says. “Zoom/digital theatre is a burgeoning practice, and I’m proud CCM is in the mix.”

The Playhouse’s series commissioned 10 local playwrights to write monologues on the theme of hope during the pandemic. Each monologue is performed by a local actor and shared on the Playhouse’s website and social media accounts. So far, the Monologues of Hope Series has shared nine new works, including Russell’s Play for Our Time and Hope Deconstructed by CCM Acting alumna Torie Wiggins (BFA, ’02).

In Play for Our Time, Russell travels back in time to the Yellow Fever outbreak of 1878 to get some advice from Cincinnati Chief Health Administrator Dr. Thomas C. Minor, portrayed by actor Barry Mulholland. The 19th-century doctor is a bit uncomfortable with Russell’s “rectangle device” (smart phone), but he manages to share some timely words of wisdom.

Wiggins’ Hope Deconstructed features actor Ernaisja Curry in a comedic monologue that examines how “we’ve been getting hope all wrong” by associating it with negativity. “Hope should be hopeful. It should sound hopeful; it should look hopeful. It should start in the eyes like smizing, then the rest of the face follows suit, then the tone of voice, then the positive words with a burst of energy,” the actor exclaims in the monologue.

Hope and creativity fuel these digital theatre projects and various online performances across the country. It is evident in the commitment of these teachers, students, actors, directors and theatre companies who are determined to stay connected and share their work in new ways.

“Theatre develops and strengthens community,” says CCM Acting student Anastasia Jacques. “Digital theatre and live performances over Zoom have made me feel so connected to people very far away.”

Jacques participated in the One Minute Play Festival’s (1MPF) Coronavirus Plays Project, which presented 625 plays via Zoom over 11 days. Russell directed 62 of the one-minute plays, which ranged in topic from “old married couples dealing with quarantine to pigeons deciding on whom they should poop,” he says.

Dominic D’Andrea is the Founder and Producing Artistic Director of the 1MPF, which is the country’s largest and longest consistently running community-engaged theatre project. Russell directed 1MPF plays when it came to Chicago in 2011 and wrote/directed for the IMPF when it came to Cincinnati in 2015. He cast CCM students for the project and passed his directing duties to a CCM Acting student the next year. A CCM Acting student has been directing for the Cincinnati 1MPF each year ever since, and Russell continues to write plays for it.

“We produce about 1,000 plays a year in 15-20 cities and communities, in real life. We just moved what we do online, so it wasn’t that hard for us,” D’Andrea says of the 1MPF Coronavirus Plays Project. “In this case we did a partnership with The Dramatists Guild of America and, for the first time ever, did an open call. We had about 1,300 emails and 625 useable plays from that. We offered the work up to our partnering orgs and alumni directors to stage some of it. So we built a little online coalition.”

Brant Russell directs CCM Acting students, alumni and other actors through Zoom in the 1MPF's Coronavirus Plays Project. Photo/1MPF

Brant Russell directs CCM Acting students, alumni and other actors through Zoom in the 1MPF’s Coronavirus Plays Project. Photo/1MPF

Russell and D’Andrea have known each other for around 15 years, dating back to when they met at the Lincoln Center Director’s Lab. When D’Andrea launched 1MPF’s Coronavirus Plays Project, he enlisted Russell to direct 62 of them.

D’Andrea estimates that a couple thousand audience members watched the plays through Zoom, and the project involved about 14 directors, 120 actors and 625 writers from 14 different countries.

Russell’s casts included Jacques as well as CCM Acting alumni Ella Eggold (BFA, ’19), Gabriella DiVincenzo (BFA, ’19) and Paige Jordan (BFA, ’20).

Jacques played various roles during the 1MPF project including a loving spouse, a poetic farmer and — her favorite — a doting New Jersey mother. This was the first digital theatre project she has worked on, but it won’t be the last. Jacques is planning to be a guest speaker on “Reliving Childhood,” a YouTube channel launched by CCM Acting students Carlee Coulehan, Sierra Coachman and Noah Buyak. “Reliving Childhood” centers around re-watching TV shows from the students’ youth, and the idea was brought to life when students were separated during quarantine.

“We are taught that live theatre is magical because the audience and the actors are in the same room breathing the same air, but I think it is important to recognize that storytelling is the best medicine — period,” Jacques says. “If we can’t breathe the same air at least we can see each other’s faces and see each other’s hearts.”


Featured image at top: The entrance to the CCM Atrium on UC’s campus. Photo/UC Creative + Brand.

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CCM Acting Class of 2020 Presents Virtual Senior Showcase

Watch a collection of five scenes showcasing the talents of CCM Acting’s Class of 2020

The Acting Department at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM Acting) proudly presents its first Virtual Senior Showcase. Although the COVID-19 novel coronavirus prevented CCM Acting from holding its customary Senior Showcases for agents and casting directors in New York and Los Angeles this spring, the program’s new Virtual Senior Showcase allows industry insiders and the general public to see this year’s seniors in action.

The video showcase includes five scenes showcasing the talents of CCM Acting’s Class of 2020. Directed by Professor D’Arcy Smith, the A.B., Dolly, Ralph and Julia Cohen Chair in Acting at CCM, the showcase features students performing excerpts from TV programs, films and plays including “227,” “Pretty Little Liars,” “Pysch” and “Embers” along with an excerpt of “My So-Called Gay Life” written by CCM Acting student Abby Palen. A collaboration with CCM’s Electronic Media program, the CCM Acting Virtual Senior Showcase features the work of E-Media majors Caleb Smiley and Carlos Herriott II. Viewer discretion is advised; this video features strong language and mature content.

“Although we’ve transitioned to remote operations, we remain committed to our ongoing academic and artistic missions,” says Smith. “Our senior Acting students have put in countless hours preparing for their industry debuts in this year’s Senior Showcase and they deserve to have their time in the spotlight. They should be very proud of everything that they have accomplished, and we are happy to present this video snapshot of their talent for the entire world to enjoy.”

Get to know the graduating seniors by reading their professional summaries!

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Students rehearse for CCM's TRANSMIGRATION Festival. Photos by CCM Acting student Jabari Carter.

TRANSMIGRATION Festival of Student Works Returns to CCM March 11-13

Admission to CCM’s TRANSMIGRATION Festival is free. Reservations are required. Tickets are available in person or over the phone through the CCM Box Office.

CCM presents six original, student-created works in the Acting Department’s TRANSMIGRATION Festival: (im)mature, Rotten Kids of Witchwood Pine, Phantasmagoria, Dirty Laundry, Entermission and HINT! A Play About Clue. Celebrating its 12th anniversary, the festival runs Wednesday, March 11, through Friday, March 13, 2020, throughout CCM Village.

TRANSMIGRATION gives CCM Acting students the freedom to produce an entirely new show from start to finish. The teams are tasked with writing, designing and producing a 30-minute piece of theatre all on their own. The shows are performed simultaneously and in non-traditional spaces throughout CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts. Attendees may customize their personal theater-going experience by viewing up to four shows of their choice throughout the evening. Show details are below.

“This is my third year in TRANSMIGRATION, and it has always been a highlight of my year. It’s always so fun and really works the muscle we need to create our own work,” said CCM Acting student Sydney Miles. “My personal favorite year and favorite role was my freshman year when I played a suitcase and travelled along with my pal, Cooper the Compass. With TRANSMIGRATION, anything can happen!”

Co-produced by CCM Acting Professors Richard Hess and Brant Russell, this unique festival has presented more than 60 original productions over the past 12 years. This year, junior Anastasia Jacques is the Associate Producer, and senior Chandler Bates is the Communication Manager.

(IM)MATURE
Remember grade school? The science fair. Getting picked last for kickball. Missing the bus. Cliques. Falling outs. Falling in love. Do you remember how you dealt with them? Did you shut down or grow up? What advice would you give your childhood self? The bus is almost here, hop on as we take a trip down memory lane and remember what it was like to discover new truths, redefine our obstacles and find out what maturity even means. As kids, all we want is to grow up. But as adults, all we want is to remember.
Cast: Zoe Cotzias, Rachel Jones, Lucas Prizant, Cameron Nalley, Ethan Murphy, Charles Gidney, Jason Pavlovich, Jake Weinheimer, Maddie Gaughn, Neuma Cohen-Denson, Mason Doyle
Location: Corbett Center Room 4755
Performance Times: 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.


ROTTEN KIDS OF WITCHWOOD PINE
As a group of students retreat to the woods, they stumble into a cursed forest called Witchwood Pine, a forest that manipulates your mind and traps you inside it. As they realize where they are and what the pine can do, they must discover what it takes to escape. Can you trust what you see?
Cast: Jabari Carter, Chandler Bates, Duncan Weinland, Reid Robison, Jack McElroy, AJ Civello, Shakoria Davis, Kay Waltermire, Ava Panagopoulos, Lydia Robison
Location: Corbett Center Room 4755
Performance Times: 7:45 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.


PHANTASMAGORIA
What is a phantasmagoria? A sequence of real or imaginary images, like those seen in a dream. This folk tale fever dream takes you on a ride through the subconscious of two sisters as they hang between life and death. Welcome to limbo. Welcome to Phantasmagoria.
Cast: Sierra Coachman, Cameron Mills, Lydia Noll, Michelle Jardine, Eli Lucas, Matt Fox, Olivia Buss, Emma Fitzgerald, Zoe Peterson, Abby Palen, Rachel Baker, Grace Eddy, Beza Kidane
Location: Corbett Center Room 4735
Performance Times: 7 p.m. and 7:45 p.m.


DIRTY LAUNDRY
There are some places that normal humans do not go. One of those is a laundromat at 4 a.m. on a Tuesday. Come visit our 24-hour laundromat, where career criminals go to wash away their dirty secrets. Tuesday after Tuesday, week after week, they’ve become an eclectic sort of clan. Aside from being loyal patrons, they all work as mercenaries for the owner. One day, when given assignments, some of the names on their lists look a little too familiar. What happens when the thing that goes “bump” in the night gets scared? Will this family of shady characters choose blood over money, or will they succumb to their fears? Step inside our laundromat, where you call some of the shots, but you may leave less clean than you came in.
Cast: Paige Jordan, Rin Wallace, Sydney Miles, Kayla Temshiv, Lily Olsen, Dustin Parsons, Noah Buyak, Malik Smith, Rachel Larson, Hunter Trammell, Morgan Piper, Jack Fogle
Location: Corbett Center Room 4735
Performance Times: 8:30 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.


ENTERMISSION
We are sad to announce that the Entermission we know and love is coming to a close. After years of dedication and imagination, it’s time to say goodbye to America’s most revolutionary attraction. But before it’s gone for good, you have one more chance to enjoy this timeless experience! Join Bells and Whistles one last time as they guide you through the love story of Humanity and Technology. Enjoy a laugh as you jump backwards in time, shed a tear as you step toward the future and witness the marvels that bridge the gaps in our lonely and fragmented world. With the help of your favorite advanced animatronics, enjoy the once in a lifetime opportunity of seeing tomorrow today. Take a seat, strap yourselves in and enter the mission!
Cast: Briley Oakley, Carlee Coulehan, Frankie Chuter, Leonard Peterson III, Gabe Nasato, Julianna Weis-Palacios, Kristina Steinmetz, Mateo Sollano, Kevin Naddeo
Location: Corbett Center Room 3705
Performance Times: 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.


HINT! A PLAY ABOUT CLUE
There has been a murder at the mansion. The guests are appalled: why would anybody want to murder the gracious host? Nobody quite knows what happened… except for the murderer, of course. Join us in retracing the truth. Will you be able to navigate the web of lies, betrayal and unrequited love in order to solve the crime?
Cast: Madison Pullman, Jack Steiner, Anastasia Jacques, Amanda Nelson, Liza Lagerstrom, Isabella Wagner, Austin Cleri, Gracie Schmidt, Ava Duvall, Ariel Shaw
Location: Corbett Center Room 3705
Performance Times: 7:45 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.


TRANSMIGRATION Performance Times

  • 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 11
  • 7 p.m. Thursday, March 12
  • 7 p.m. Friday, March 13

Location

CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission

Admission is free. Reservations are required. Tickets are available in person or over the phone through the CCM Box Office. Please visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.

Parking and Directions

Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.


Story by CCM Graduate Student Alexandra Doyle

CCM News CCMONSTAGE Student Salutes

First Look: CCMONSTAGE ‘Clybourne Park’

CCMONSTAGE Play Series presents Bruce Norris’ provocative comedy inspired by Lorraine Hansberry’s “A Raisin in the Sun” through Feb. 16, 2020. Tickets are on sale now.

Bruce Norris’ award-winning play, Clybourne Park continues at UC’s College-Conservatory of Music tonight, Feb. 14, through Sunday, Feb. 16, 2020, as part of the CCMONSTAGE Play Series. Acting Professor Richard Hess, director of the production, recently discussed how he and students have prepared for the play with Cincinnati arts reporter Rick Pender on WVXU’s “Around Cincinnati” program.

“When choosing titles at CCM I try to pick exciting pieces that have something to say about the world today, and Clybourne Park might be yelling more loudly in 2020 than even when it was first written,” Hess says in the interview. Listen to the full interview on WVXU.

Get a sneak peek at the production in the slideshow below. Photos by Mark Lyons.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Now in its 10th anniversary year, Clybourne Park examines how Americans talk — or don’t talk — about race, class and real estate. It was written by Norris as a modernized response to Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, focusing on the home Hansberry’s protagonists were set to move into at the end of her seminal drama. Clybourne Park begins in 1959, as a grieving white family prepares to sell their home to an African-American family, causing anxiety in their middle-class Chicago neighborhood.

The second act takes place 50 years later, as a white family purchases the same home in the now predominantly African-American neighborhood, and makes plans to raze and rebuild the dwelling. Tensions rise in each act as the characters debate over the past, present and future of the home. This production contains strong language.

The 2019-20 CCMONSTAGE Play Series presents Clybourne Park through Feb. 16, 2020, at Patricia Corbett Theater. Tickets are on sale now through the CCM Box Office; student discounts are available.

Creative Team

  • Richard Hess, director
  • Will Graham*, production stage manager
  • Mark Halpin, scenic designer
  • Nina Agelvis*, lighting designer
  • Joanne West*, costume designer
  • Jerome Horng*, wig and make-up designer
  • Ryan Hurt*, sound designer
  • Sammi Grant, dialect and vocal coach

* CCM Student

Cast List

  • Matt Fox as Russ Stoller
  • Abby Palen as Bev Stoller
  • Paige Jordan as Francine
  • Charles Gidney as Albert
  • Dustin Parsons as Jim
  • Duncan Weinland as Karl
  • Julianna Weis-Palacios as Betsy
  • Lucas Prizant as Steve Driscoll
  • Madison Pullman as Lindsey Driscoll
  • Carlee Coulehan as Kathy
  • Neuma Joy as Lena
  • Trey Peterson as Kevin
  • AJ Civello as Tom
  • Gabe Nasato as Dan
  • Austin James Cleri as Kenneth

Performance Times

  • 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12 (preview)
  • 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13
  • 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14
  • 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16

Location

Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets

Single tickets prices start at $32.50; preview performance ticket prices start at $15.50. Student discounts and group rates are also available.

Learn about additional ticket options for current CCM students.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online now through our e-box office.

Directions and Parking

CCM is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions for detailed driving directions to CCM Village.

Parking is available in UC’s CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors.


CCMONSTAGE Production Sponsor: Macy’s

A preeminent institution for the performing and media arts, the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) is the largest single source of performing arts presentations in the state of Ohio. All event dates and programs are subject to change. For a complete calendar of events, please visit us online at ccm.uc.edu.

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Provocative Comedy ‘Clybourne Park’ Continues CCM’s 2019-20 Play Series

CCMONSTAGE Play Series presents Bruce Norris’ racially-charged play inspired by Lorraine Hansberry’s “A Raisin in the Sun” on Feb. 12-16, 2020. Tickets are on sale now.

CCM continues its new CCMONSTAGE Play Series with Bruce Norris’ Clybourne Park, running Feb. 13-16, 2020, with a preview performance on Wednesday, Feb. 12. Dubbed “vital,” “sharp-witted” and “ferociously smart” by the New York TimesClybourne Park imagines events in a typical American neighborhood and reveals that underneath a family home, racial fault lines run deep and wide.

Winner of a Pulitzer Prize, Olivier Award and Tony Award, Clybourne Park examines how Americans talk — or don’t talk — about race, class and real estate. It was written by Norris as a modernized response to Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, focusing on the home Hansberry’s protagonists were set to move into at the end of her seminal drama. Clybourne Park begins in 1959, as a grieving white family prepares to sell their home to an African-American family, causing anxiety in their middle-class Chicago neighborhood.

The second act takes place 50 years later, as a white family purchases the same home in the now predominantly African-American neighborhood, and makes plans to raze and rebuild the dwelling. Tensions rise in each act as the characters debate over the past, present and future of the home. This production contains strong language.

“Racial fault lines in America run deep and we have a duty to examine them closely if we hope to change,” says CCM Acting Professor Richard Hess, director of Clybourne Park. “The students in the CCM Acting Department are not afraid to step into dangerous territory as artists. The path forged by Lorraine Hansberry must be explored if we hope to honor the struggle for equality that demands our attention.”

Clybourne Park is whip smart and it sizzles and cracks with biting insight,” Hess adds. “You will gasp, you will laugh and you will understand better that the more things change in America, the more they stay the same.”

The 2019-20 CCMONSTAGE Play Series presents Clybourne Park on Feb. 12 (preview)-16, 2020, at Patricia Corbett Theater. Tickets are on sale now through the CCM Box Office; student discounts are available.

Creative Team

  • Richard Hess, director
  • Will Graham*, production stage manager
  • Mark Halpin, scenic designer
  • Nina Agelvis*, lighting designer
  • Joanne West*, costume designer
  • Jerome Horng*, wig and make-up designer
  • Ryan Hurt*, sound designer
  • Sammi Grant, dialect and vocal coach

* CCM Student

Cast List

  • Matt Fox as Russ Stoller
  • Abby Palen as Bev Stoller
  • Paige Jordan as Francie
  • Charles Gidney as Albert
  • Dustin Parsons as Jim
  • Duncan Weinland as Karl
  • Julianna Weis-Palacios as Betsy
  • Lucas Prizant as Steve Driscoll
  • Madison Pullman as Lindsey Driscoll
  • Carlee Coulehan as Kathy
  • Neuma Joy as Lena
  • Trey Peterson as Kevin
  • AJ Civello as Tom
  • Gabe Nasato as Dan
  • Austin James Cleri as Kenneth

Performance Times

  • 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12 (preview)
  • 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13
  • 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14
  • 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16

Location

Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets

Single tickets prices start at $32.50; preview performance ticket prices start at $15.50. Student discounts and group rates are also available.

Learn about additional ticket options for current CCM students.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online now through our e-box office.

Directions and Parking

CCM is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions for detailed driving directions to CCM Village.

Parking is available in UC’s CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors.


CCMONSTAGE Production Sponsor: Macy’s

A preeminent institution for the performing and media arts, the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) is the largest single source of performing arts presentations in the state of Ohio. All event dates and programs are subject to change. For a complete calendar of events, please visit us online at ccm.uc.edu.

CCM News CCMONSTAGE Student Salutes

CCM Stages Award-Winning Mystery ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’

The CCMONSTAGE Play Series presents this moving coming-of-age tale about the challenges and wonders of life on Oct. 17-20, 2019. Tickets are on sale now.

CCM continues its new CCMONSTAGE Play Series with The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, playing Oct. 17-20 in Cohen Family Studio Theater. Winner of the 2015 Tony Award for Best Play, the production is based on the novel by Mark Haddon and adapted for the stage by Simon Stephens.

The story focuses on 15-year-old Christopher and how he uses his extraordinary brain to navigate everyday life. He is exceptional at mathematics, but has never ventured alone beyond the end of his road. He detests being touched and he distrusts strangers, overwhelmed by sensory overload.

When Christopher finds his neighbor’s dead dog, he becomes determined to solve the mystery and find the murderer. His detective work takes him on a thrilling journey through London that overturns his entire world.

“Christopher is a hero on a hero’s journey,” says CCM Acting Professor Richard E. Hess, director of the play. “He teaches us about courage, about resilience, about curiosity and about hope. This play is a revelation, a magical journey to the heart.”

Read more about this season’s Play Series in The News Record.

The 2019-20 CCMONSTAGE Play Series presents The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time on Oct. 17-20, 2019, at Cohen Family Studio Theater. Tickets are on sale now through the CCM Box Office; student discounts are available.
____________________

Creative Team

  • Richard Hess, director
  • Mallory Bruno, production stage manager
  • Seth Howard*, scenic designer
  • Alex Mason*, lighting designer
  • Travis Byrne*, sound designer
  • Sammi Grant, dialect coach

* CCM Student

Cast List

  • Jabari Carter as Christopher
  • Amanda Nelson as Siobhan
  • Gabe Nasato as Ed
  • Sierra Coachman as Judy
  • Chandler Bates as Voice One, Mrs. Shears, Mrs. Gascoyne, Woman on Train, Shopkeeper
  • Noah Buyak as Voice Two, Roger (Mr. Shears), Duty Sergeant, Mr. Wise, Man Behind Counter, Drunk One
  • Reid Robison as Voice Three, Policeman, Mr. Thompson, Drunk Two, Man with Socks, London Policeman
  • Frankie Chuter as Voice Four, Reverend Peters, Uncle Terry, Station Policeman, Station Guard
  • Kayla Temshiv as Voice Five, No. 40, Lady in Street, Information, Punk Girl
  • Michelle Jardine as Voice Six, Mrs. Alexander, Posh Woman

Performance Times

  • 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17
  • 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18
  • 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20

Location

Cohen Family Studio Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets

Single tickets prices start at $27; student discounts and group rates are also available.

Learn about additional ticket options for current CCM students.

Tickets and subscriptions can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online now through our e-box office.

Directions and Parking

CCM is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions for detailed driving directions to CCM Village.

Parking is available in UC’s CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors.
____________________

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc. New York.

CCMONSTAGE Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

Welcome to What’s Next: CCM Shares Fall 2019 Calendar

The UC College-Conservatory of Music’s fall CCMONSTAGE events range from choral and winds concerts to theatre arts productions and more. Performances start on Sept. 10, 2019.

Click the image to view a digital version of CCM’s fall 2019 calendar of major events.

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music presents more than 70 major events during its CCMONSTAGE fall 2019 performance series. New this year, arts lovers can purchase subscription packages and single tickets online through the college’s new digital box office at ccmonstage.universitytickets.com. Tickets are on sale to the general public now.

This fall’s lineup of free and ticketed events includes faculty and guest artist recitals, fully supported theatre and dance productions, choral, winds, orchestral and jazz performances and much more! You can learn about CCM’s fall schedule of performing and media arts events by referring to the list below.

You can also view a digital copy of CCM’s Fall Calendar of Events by visiting https://issuu.com/ccmpr/docs/ccmonstage-fall-2019-calendar-booklet.

CCMONSTAGE Fall 2019 Calendar of Major Events

September

7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10
• Faculty Artist Series •
WHAT ARE PATTERNS FOR?
Amy Johnson, soprano
Kathleen Kelly, piano

Soprano Amy Johnson joins forces with Kathleen Kelly, marking Kelly’s first faculty recital since joining CCM in 2018. This recital features the world premiere of Judith Shatin’s mono-drama, Patterns, written for Johnson and based on Amy Lowell’s eponymous poem. Other selections include George Crumb’s Three Early Songs, three works by Richard Hundley and a pastiche grouping of Elinor Remick Warren, Madeleine Dring, Katherine Hoover and Ricky Ian Gordan. Each segment offers settings of poetry by early 20th-century luminaries Sara Teasdale, Edna St. Vincent Millay and Anna Wickham as well as Lowell.
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11
THE INNOCENTS
Featuring faculty artist Allen Otte and guest artist John Lane, voices, percussion and electronics
An evening-length performance art piece for speaking percussionists and electronic soundscape that is in response to the national Innocence Project, which works to exonerate wrongly convicted individuals and advocates for reforms to the criminal justice system.
Location: Cohen Family Studio Theater
Admission: FREE


4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 15
• Winds Series •
CIRCUS MAXIMUS
CCM Wind Symphony and Wind Ensemble
Kevin Michael Holzman and Thomas Gamboa, music directors and conductors
Featuring faculty artist Michael Chertock, piano

The CCM Wind Symphony and Wind Ensemble open the season with a thrilling program culminating in John Corigliano’s surround-sound masterpiece Circus Maximus.
Wind Ensemble:

GALBRAITH: Danza de los Duendes
MCBETH: Kaddish
PERSICHETTI: Symphony No. 6 for Band, Op. 69
Wind Symphony:

ETEZADY: Shoutout
GERSHWIN: Rhapsody in Blue
CORIGLIANO: Symphony No. 3, Circus Maximus
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets
: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 17
• Guest Artist Series •
Yogesh Samsi and Hardeep Chana, tabla
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19
LA CRÉATION DU MONDE
CCM Chamber Orchestra
Aik Khai Pung and Kevin Michael Holzman, music directors and conductors

SCHOENBERG: Verklärte Nacht
POULENC: Aubade for Piano and Orchestra
MILHAUD: La Création du Monde
Location:
Cohen Family Studio Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 20
• Orchestra Series •
SEASON-OPENING CONCERT
CCM Philharmonia
Mark Gibson, music director and conductor
Featuring faculty artist Giora Schmidt, violin

DVOŘÁK: Slavonic Dance in C Major, Op. 46, No. 1
DVOŘÁK: Violin Concerto in A Minor, Op. 53
BRAHMS: Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 73
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $25; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22
• Faculty Artist Series •
Quinn Patrick Ankrum, mezzo-soprano
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22
• Jazz Series •
SWINGING WITH WOODY HERMAN:
THE INAUGURAL JOHN VON OHLEN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT
CCM Jazz Orchestra
Scott Belck, music director
Featuring guest artist John Fedchock, trombone/composer
Hot off their Summer 2019 tour with Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, the CCM Jazz Orchestra celebrates the legacy of Cincinnati jazz legend John Von Ohlen, who drummed with Stan Kenton and Woody Herman before joining CCM’s jazz faculty. This memorial concert raises scholarship funds in Von Ohlen’s honor.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $21.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24
• CCM String-Quartet-in-Residence •
DARKNESS AND LIGHT
The Ariel Quartet
CCM’s award-winning string quartet-in-residence opens its 2019-20 concert series with a program featuring:
HAYDN: String Quartet in D Minor, Op. 76, No. 2, “Fifths”
DUN: Eight Colors for String Quartet (1986)
SCHUBERT: String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor, D. 810, “Death and the Maiden”
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Tickets: Prices start at $29.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.

The Ariel Quartet’s 2019-20 CCM concert series is made possible by the generous contributions of an anonymous donor, The Estate of Mr. William A. Friedlander, Mrs. William A. Friedlander, Dr. Randolph L. Wadsworth, Mr. and Mrs. J. David Rosenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Santen, Elizabeth C. B. and Paul G. Sittenfeld, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Stegman, Dr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Striker and Mrs. Harry M. Hoffheimer.


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26
• Winds Series •
ICONS
CCM Chamber Winds
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor

The CCM Chamber Winds opens its season with an evening of works by renowned composers of the 20th century.
PERSICHETTI: Serenade No. 1
HINDEMITH: Septet for Winds
ARRIEU: Dixtuor
STRAUSS: Suite in B-flat, Op. 4
Location:
Cohen Family Studio Theater
Admission: FREE


4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28
• Choral Series •
CHORAL SHOWCASE
CCM Chamber Choir and Chorale, UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses, and Cincinnati Youth Choir
Earl Rivers, Brett Scott, Molly Getsinger, Matthew Coffey and Robyn Lana, music directors and conductors
Featuring guest conductor and CCM alumnus Miguel Felipe

The CCM Chamber Choir performs Dallapiccola’s Canti di prigionia (Songs of Imprisonment) with texts of Mary Stuart’s Prayer, The Invocation of Boethius and Savonarola’s Farewell; CCM Chorale performs an eclectic mass derived from Virgil Thomson’s Kyrie Eleison, Rachmaninoff’s Glory to God from All-Night Vigil, Schütz’s Wir glauben all an einen Gott, Rheinberger’s Sanctus and Benedictus and Giles Swayne’s Agnus Dei. The Cincinnati Youth Choir and UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses offer a variety of contrasting repertoire.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 30
• Guest Artist Series •
Jean-Baptiste Robin, organ
Location:
Trinity Episcopal Church, 326 Madison Ave, Covington, KY 41011
Admission: FREE


October

7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1
• Jazz Series •
FROM BOP TO POP
CCM Jazz Lab Band
Craig Bailey, music director
Featuring the music of Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker along with today’s popular jazz artists.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3
• Orchestra Series •
PRIDE OF RUSSIA
CCM Philharmonia
Mark Gibson, music director and conductor
Featuring faculty artist Dror Biran, piano

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV: Russian Easter Overture
SHOSTAKOVICH: Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat Major, Op. 102
PROKOFIEV: Symphony No. 5 in B-flat Major, Op. 100
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $25; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2 (preview)
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3
7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4
2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5
2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6
• Play Series •
LADY WINDERMERE’S FAN

By Oscar Wilde
Susan Felder, director

Infidelity, blackmail, a birthday ball and a fan are at the center of this 19th-century satire set in London. Lady Windermere suspects that her husband is having an affair with a mysterious woman. Will she exact her revenge and find comfort in another man? What is the true identity of the mysterious Mrs. Erlynne — and why is Lord Windermere secretly giving her money? A witty evaluation of marriage, sex and gender politics, this classic by Oscar Wilde gave the world the iconic line: “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”
Location
: Patricia Corbett Theater
Tickets
: Prices start at $32.50; student and group discounts available. Preview performance tickets start at $15.50. Buy tickets online.

CCMONSTAGE Production Sponsor: Macy’s


5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5
• Starling Series •
STARLING SHOWCASE
Kurt Sassmannshaus, music director
Showcasing the superbly talented young students from the Starling Preparatory String Project and Starling College class.
Location: Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5
• Winds Series •
GRAND PIANOLA MUSIC
CCM Wind Symphony
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor
Featuring faculty artist Michael Chertock, piano, and student soloists Giuliano Graniti and Fabio Menchetti, piano

LAMB MCCUNE: Caveat
ADAMS: Grand Pianola Music
GERSHWIN: Concerto in F
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6
• Guest Artist Series •
Oscar Ghiglia, guitar
Celebrating over 40 years of residencies at CCM, virtuoso Oscar Ghiglia performs a solo recital of his concert favorites.
Location: Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE

7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7
• Winds Series •
CCM BRASS SHOWCASE: STRAUSS, SCHULLER, SHOSTAKOVICH
CCM Brass Choir
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor

CCM’s nationally-recognized Brass Choir performs selections featuring brass ensembles large and small consisting of students from the CCM horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba/euphonium and percussion studios.
STRAUSS/FRIEDMAN: A Strauss Fanfare
STRAUSS: Allerseelen
SHOSTAKOVICH: Allegro from Symphony No. 10 in E Minor, Op. 93
SCHULLER: Symphony for Brass and Percussion, Op. 16
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8
• Orchestra Series •
THE GREAT
CCM Concert Orchestra
Aik Khai Pung, music director and conductor

BEETHOVEN: Egmont Overture
LARSEN: Symphony: Water Music
SCHUBERT: Symphony No. 9 in C Major, D. 944 (“The Great”)
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8
• Guest Artist Series •
Eric Pritchard, violin
James Tocco, piano

Featuring sonatas by Beethoven, Ravel and Strauss.
Location: Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17
7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18
2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19
2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20
• Play Series •
THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME

Based on the novel by Mark Haddon
Adapted by Simon Stephens
Richard E. Hess, director

In this 2015 Tony Award-winning Best Play, 15-year-old Christopher uses his extraordinary brain to navigate everyday life. He is exceptional at mathematics but has never ventured alone beyond the end of his road. He detests being touched and he distrusts strangers, overwhelmed by sensory overload. When Christopher finds his neighbor’s dead dog, Wellington, he becomes determined to solve the mystery of who murdered the dog. His detective work takes him on a thrilling journey through London that overturns his entire world.
Location
: Cohen Family Studio Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $27; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18
CARNIVAL OF THE ANIMALS
CCM Chamber Orchestra
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor

SAINT-SAËNS: Carnival of the Animals (chamber version)
CHIN: Double Concerto for percussion and prepared piano
ROUSE: Iscariot
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20
• Faculty Artist Series •
Daniel Weeks, tenor
Donna Loewy, piano
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22
• CCM String-Quartet-in-Residence •
THE FUGUE
The Ariel Quartet

This concert of fugues features Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 13 with its original final movement, the Grosse Fugue, which is often performed on its own as Beethoven’s Opus 133.
MOZART: Adagio and Fugue in C Minor, K. 546
BARTÓK: String Quartet No. 1 in A Minor, Op. 7
BEETHOVEN: String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 and 133
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Tickets: Prices start at $29.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.

The Ariel Quartet’s 2019-20 CCM concert series is made possible by the generous contributions of an anonymous donor, The Estate of Mr. William A. Friedlander, Mrs. William A. Friedlander, Dr. Randolph L. Wadsworth, Mr. and Mrs. J. David Rosenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Santen, Elizabeth C. B. and Paul G. Sittenfeld, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Stegman, Dr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Striker and Mrs. Harry M. Hoffheimer.


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23
• Guest Artist Series •
Loadbang

New York City chamber ensemble Loadbang visits CCM for two concerts, the first featuring some of their favorite works commissioned for the ensemble, and the second consisting of compositions written for Loadbang by CCM student composers.
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24
7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25
2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26
2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27
• Musicals Series •
42ND STREET
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Al Dubin
Book by Michael Stewart and Mark Bramble
Based on the Novel by Bradford Ropes
Original Direction and Dances by Gower Champion
Originally Produced on Broadway by David Merrick
The use of all songs is by arrangement with Warner Bros.,
the owner of music publishers’ rights
Diane Lala, director and co-choreographer
Katie Johannigman, co-choreographer
Roger Grodsky, musical director
The ultimate show-biz musical, 42nd Street celebrates Broadway, Times Square and the people who make the magic of musical theatre. Aspiring chorus girl Peggy Sawyer comes to the big city from Allentown, Pennsylvania, and soon lands her first big job in the ensemble of a glitzy new Broadway show. But just before opening night, the leading lady breaks her ankle. Will Peggy be able to step in and become a star? The score is chock-full of Broadway standards, including “You’re Getting To Be A Habit With Me,” “Dames,” “We’re In the Money,” “Lullaby of Broadway,” “Shuffle Off to Buffalo” and “Forty-Second Street.”
Location: Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $35.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.

CCMONSTAGE Production Sponsors: Macy’s and Dr. & Mrs. Carl G. Fischer


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24
• Winds Series •
SOMETHING OLD, NEW, BORROWED AND BLUE
CCM Wind Ensemble
Thomas Gamboa, music director and conductor
Featuring faculty artist Alan Siebert, trumpet

PRESS: Wedding Dance from “Hasseneh”
SALFELDER: Crossing Parallels
BRYANT: Ecstatic Waters
REED: Variations on the “Porazzi” Theme of Wagner
HAYDN: Trumpet Concerto in E-flat Major
CICHY: Divertimento for Winds and Percussion
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Admission: FREE


4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26
CCM Percussion Ensemble
James Culley, music coordinator
Featuring works by the usual suspects:  Henry Cowell, John Cage and Bill Russell; along with Edgard Varese and Gerald Strang.
Location
: Patricia Corbett Theater
Admission: FREE


7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26
• Starling Series •
Starling Chamber Orchestra
Kurt Sassmannshaus, music director

Showcasing the superbly talented young students from the Starling Preparatory String Project.
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27
• CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement •
GINO DIMARIO SCHOLARSHIP RECITAL

CCM Prep music students will perform in this annual fundraising recital for the Gino DiMario Memorial Scholarship Fund. Please join us for a reception following the performance.
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE, donations accepted


7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27
• Jazz Series •
FLYING HOME
CCM Jazz Orchestra
Scott Belck, music director
Featuring faculty artist Rusty Burge, percussion

The Terry Gibbs Dream Band was the hottest band in LA in late ‘50s and early ‘60s with Gibbs leading the way with blazing solos on the vibraphone. CCM faculty artist and Percussion Group Cincinnati band member Rusty Burge joins the Jazz Orchestra for a night of the swinging-est charts you’ve ever heard.
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27
48-HOUR FILM FESTIVAL
Richard E. Hess, producer

Join us for our annual celebration of original student film work. After random team placement, student writers, actors, directors, editors and composers have 48 hours from 7 p.m. on Friday night to 7 p.m. on Sunday night to create original short films. With more than 100 UC student participants, eight short films will be screened.
Location:
MainStreet Cinema, UC’s Tangeman University Center
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29
• Faculty Artist Series •
Jan Grüning, viola
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31
7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1
2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2
2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7
7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8
2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9
2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10
• Musicals Series •
Richard O’Brien’s
THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW
Book, Music and Lyrics by Richard O’Brien

Vincent DeGeorge, director and choreographer

Stephen Goers, musical director
In this cult classic, sweethearts Brad and Janet, stuck with a flat tire during a storm, discover the eerie mansion of Dr. Frank-N-Furter, a transvestite scientist. As their innocence is lost, Brad and Janet meet a houseful of wild characters, including a rocking biker and a creepy butler. Through elaborate dances and rock songs, Frank-N-Furter unveils his latest creation: a muscular man named Rocky. Celebrate Halloween with this deliberately kitschy rock ‘n’ roll sci-fi gothic musical, which features popular hits such as “Science Fiction – Double Feature,” “Time Warp” and “Hot Patootie (Bless My Soul).” For mature audiences.
Location
: Cohen Family Studio Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $29.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.

Musical Theatre Production Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. James L. Miller


November

7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1
• Orchestra Series •
CSI HALLOWEEN: POST-MORTEM
CCM Philharmonia and Chamber Orchestra
Mark Gibson, music director
Featuring guest artist Leslie B. Dunner, conductor and chief medical examiner

LISZT: Totentanz
SAINT-SAËNS: Carnival of the “Dead” Animals
BRITTEN: “Dead” Person’s Guide to the Orchestra
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $20; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2
• Winds Series •
LEGACY
CCM Wind Symphony
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor
Terence Milligan, music director emeritus
Featuring the Walnut Hills High School Wind Ensemble
Featuring faculty artist Mark Ostoich, oboe

CCM faculty artist Mark Ostoich joins the Wind Symphony for a performance of Oscar Navarro’s Legacy, a concerto for oboe and wind ensemble.
GRAINGER: Colonial Song
SCHOENBERG: Theme and Variations
SALFELDER: Cathedrals
NAVARRO: Legacy
HINDEMITH: Symphony in B-flat
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3
• Choral and Winds Series •
MUSIC FOR A CATHEDRAL
CCM Chamber Choir and Brass Choir
Earl Rivers and Kevin Michael Holzman, music directors and conductors

In the splendor of Covington’s Cathedral Basilica, CCM presents selections from G. Gabrieli’s Sacrae Symphoniae, Frank Martin’s Mass for Double Choir, Henry Purcell’s Music for the Funeral of Queen Mary, Heinrich Schütz’s Alleluja! Lobet den Herren (Psalm 150), Richard Wagner’s “Elsa’s Procession to the Cathedral” from Lohengrin and Sir William Walton’s Coronation Te Deum.
Location:
Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption 1101 Madison Ave., Covington, KY 41011
Admission: FREE


7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3
• Jazz Series •
THE MUSIC OF STEVIE WONDER
CCM Jazz Lab Band
Craig Bailey, music director
Featuring guest artist Tyshawn Colquitt, vocals

The groove is guaranteed to be “Signed, Sealed, Delivered” in this musical tribute to one of Motown’s brightest stars! Hear the hits of Stevie Wonder brought to life by the CCM Jazz Lab Band and Cincinnati native Tyshawn Colquitt, a seven-time winner of Showtime at the Apollo and recent contestant on NBC’s The Voice singing competition.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $27.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5
• Choral Series •
GRANT US PEACE
UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses
Matthew Coffey and Molly Getsinger, conductors

Comprised of students from all 14 of UC’s colleges, the UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses and Cabaret Singers present Vaughan Williams’ Dona Nobis Pacem, with texts from the Mass, poems of Walt Whitman, a political speech and the Bible. Spirituals, jazz and popular favorites complete the program.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5
A VIEW FROM THE EDGE

A showcase of music by CCM student composers.
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5
CCM Classical Guitar Ensemble
Clare Callahan, music director

Solos, duos, trios and quartets for classical guitar.
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 6
• Guest Artist Series •
Madeleine Mitchell, violin
Michael Delfin, piano
The first half of the program includes British works spanning the last 100 years, including works by Edward Elgar, Herbert Howells, Grace Williams and Sir James MacMillan’s Kiss on Wood, which was written for Madeleine Mitchell. The second half of the program features the premiere of faculty artist Douglas Knehans’ Mist Waves, which was written specially for Mitchell. The recital closes with Edvard Grieg’s popular and passionate Violin Sonata No. 3 in C Minor, Op. 45. Mitchell has been described by The Times as “one of the UK’s liveliest musical forces and foremost violinists” and has performed in 50 countries. She is renowned for her championship of British music and her recent album of the Chamber Music of Grace Williams (1906-77) for Naxos has been highly acclaimed. Read more about Mitchell at www.madeleinemitchell.com
Location: Patricia Corbett Theater
Admission
: FREE


7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8
• Orchestra Series •
SHOSTAKOVICH FIFTH
CCM Concert Orchestra
Aik Khai Pung, music director and conductor

BORODIN: Prince Igor Overture
BRITTEN: Lachrymae, Op. 48a
SAINT-SAËNS: Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 28
SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 5 in D Minor, Op. 47
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Admission: FREE


4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10
• Guest Artist Series •
Jeffrey Springer, tenor
Amy Johnson, soprano
Daniel Weeks, tenor
Internationally acclaimed lirico-spinto tenor Jeffrey Springer is joined by CCM’s Amy Johnson, soprano, for a concert of music by Anton Coppola. Still active at age 102, Coppola contributed several new works for this event. His career as a composer, conductor and teacher (maestro) spans 85 years and has taken him from Broadway to major opera houses around the world.  The concert features excerpts from his opera Sacco and Vanzetti, which Springer premiered and Johnson has recorded.
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14
FROM PARIS WITH LOVE
CCM Chamber Orchestra
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor
Featuring faculty artist Dwight Parry, oboe

POULENC: Mouvements perpétuels
BRITTEN: Sinfonietta, Op. 1
MARTINŮ: Oboe Concerto, H.353
FARRENC: Nonet in E-flat Major, Op. 38
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16
• Guest Artist Series •
Sergio Carolino, tuba
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17
• Winds Series •
PRISM
CCM Wind Studies
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor
Featuring the Cincinnati Youth Wind Ensembles

Join us for a thrilling afternoon of nonstop music, featuring the CCM Wind Symphony, CCM Wind Ensemble, CCM Brass Choir, CCM Chamber Winds, the Cincinnati Youth Wind Ensemble (CYWE), the UC Bearcat Band and more!
Location: Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


CANCELLED
4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17
THE WELL-TEMPERED CLAVIER, BOOK 2
Featuring CCM student artists

Piano students from the piano studio of James Tocco present a recital of J.S. Bach’s masterpiece of the keyboard repertoire.
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall

Admission: FREE


7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17
CLASSICAL GUITAR CHAMBER MUSIC
Clare Callahan, music director and coordinator

Pieces for guitar with voice, strings and winds.
Location:
Watson Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19
SONIC EXPLORATIONS
Mara Helmuth, coordinator

Featuring an evening of electroacoustic and computer music by CCM students, faculty and guests.
Location
: Cohen Family Studio Theater
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20
• Winds Series •
GIVE US THIS DAY
CCM Wind Ensemble
Thomas Gamboa, music director and conductor
Ann Porter, guest conductor
Featuring faculty artist Ron Aufmann, clarinet

JOLLEY: Motordom
WHITACRE: October
HOLST: Second Suite in F
TULL: Sketches on a Tudor Pslam
BACH: Fantasia in G Major, BWV 572
MASLANKA: Give Us This Day
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21
7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 23
2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24
• Opera Series •
THE BARTERED BRIDE

Music by Bedřich Smetana
Libretto by Karel Sabina
New English translation by CCM faculty artist Kathleen Kelly
Levi Hammer, conductor
Audrey Chait, director
Part bubbly operetta and part Bohemian folk pageant, The Bartered Bride is a romantic comedy set in a Czech community in Texas in 1948. Mařenka is arranged to marry the son of a rich landowner, but she is in love with someone else. Defiantly, Mařenka vows before her parents that she will only accept her love, Jeník, as her husband. As her parents and the matchmaker fight for the arranged marriage, the young lovers fight against tradition in order to be together.
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $39.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.

CCMONSTAGE Production Sponsor: Macy’s


7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21
• Orchestra Series •
CCM Concert Orchestra
Aik Khai Pung, music director and conductor
Princeton High School Symphonic Orchestra
Marie Knueven, music director and conductor

A side-by-side concert presented by the CCM Concert Orchestra and Princeton High School Symphonic Orchestra.
Location:
Princeton High School, 100 Viking Way, Cincinnati, OH 45246
Admission: FREE


1:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22
• The Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Thinking About Music Lecture Series •
DOES MUSIC THEORY MATTER?
Timothy Cutler, Cleveland Institute of Music

Have you ever wondered what classical music’s great composers and performers thought about music theory and analysis? Did it matter to them, and should it matter to us? Timothy Cutler, Professor and Head of Music Theory at the Cleveland Institute of Music, will address these questions in his talk.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE


5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22
• Guest Artist Series •
Ned McGowan, flute
Location: Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22
• Orchestra Series •
CONCERTO CONCERT
CCM Philharmonia
Mark Gibson, music director
Aik Khai Pung, conductor
Featuring CCM student soloists

MOZART: Concerto for Flute and Harp in C Major, K. 299
MENDELSSOHN: Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64
BIZET: Symphony in C
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24
• Jazz Series •
DUKE ELLINGTON’S NUTCRACKER SUITE
CCM Jazz Orchestra and Jazz Lab Band
Featuring CCM Musical Theatre students
Scott Belck, music director
Diane Lala, choreographer
Enjoy our original retelling of Ellington’s remarkable adaptation of The Nutcracker Suite, brought to life with stunning choreography from CCM Musical Theatre’s stars of tomorrow.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $29.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26
• Winds Series •
MR. TAMBOURINE MAN
CCM Wind Symphony
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor
Featuring student artist Shannon Cochran, soprano

The CCM Wind Symphony commemorates the 50th anniversary year of the Stonewall Riots, featuring John Corigliano’s masterful Mr. Tambourine Man on lyrics of Bob Dylan.
COPLAND: Fanfare for the Common Man
HIGDON: Mysterium
CLAY METTENS: Un-Masqued
THOMAS: A Mother of a Revolution!
CORIGLIANO: Mr. Tambourine Man
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


December

7:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2
• Winds Series •
CCM BRASS SHOWCASE: HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR!
CCM Brass Choir
Kevin Michael Holzman, music director and conductor

CCM’s nationally-recognized Brass Choir performs classical and popular holiday selections, featuring brass ensembles large and small consisting of students from the CCM horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba/euphonium and percussion studios.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Admission: FREE


5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3
• Guest Artist Series •
New Third Stream Quartet
Location
: Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5
VOCAL CHAMBER MUSIC
CCM Chamber Orchestra
Aik Khai Pung, music director and conductor
Gwen Coleman Detwiler, artistic director

HOOVER: Seven Haiku
STROZZI: “L’astratto” and “che si può fare”
BRITTEN: Canticle III
MAHLER: Songs of a Wayfarer (arr. Schoenberg)
Location:
Cohen Family Studio Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5
7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7
3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8
• Dance Series •
THE ART OF MOTION
Deirdre Carberry, director

CCM Dance showcases an array of classic and contemporary works restaged and choreographed by CCM Dance faculty members.
Location
: Patricia Corbett Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $29.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.

CCMONSTAGE Production Sponsor: Macy’s


CANCELLED
7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6
• Guest Artist Series •
Esther Lamneck, clarinet and tárogató
Alfonso Belfiore, piano and composer
Location:
Cohen Family Studio Theater

Admission: FREE


2 and 5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7
2 and 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8
FEAST OF CAROLS
CCM Chamber Choir, Chorale and Concert Orchestra, UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses, and Cincinnati Youth Choir
Featuring guest choirs from Little Miami, Milford, St. Xavier and Walnut Hills High Schools
Earl Rivers, Brett Scott, Robyn Lana, Molly Getsinger and Matthew Coffey conductors, with guest conductors Sarah J. Baker, Tracy Carpenter, Anthony Nims and Jeffrey Stern

Bring family and friends to CCM to welcome the 2019 holiday season with festive choral favorites performed by CCM’s, UC’s and CYC’s fabulous choirs and outstanding guest choirs.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: Prices start at $21.50; student and group discounts are available. Buy tickets online.


7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9
• CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement •
Cincinnati Youth Wind Ensemble and Jr. Youth Wind Ensemble
Ann Porter, Kevin Michael Holzman, Thomas Gamboa, Christopher Nichter and Rick Canter, conductors

The area’s most talented middle and high school instrumentalists perform traditional and contemporary band music.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 11
University of Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
Michael Lund Zeigler, music director and conductor

Comprised of non-music majors, UC’s campus orchestra is designed to provide students with an opportunity to share their love of great music from the orchestral repertoire.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 11
• CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement •
Preparatory Brass Choir
Paul Hillner, music director
Location:
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall
Admission: FREE


7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 12
UC Bearcat Bands
Christopher Nichter, music director

Join the UC Bearcat Bands for a thrilling evening of music. Consisting primarily of students majoring in fields outside of music, these future musical citizens are sure to impress and inspire!
Location:
Corbett Auditorium Great Hall (Room 465) of UC’s Tangeman University Center
Admission: FREE


7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14
• CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement •
FALL YOUTH BALLET CONCERT
Jonnie Lynn Jacobs-Percer, director

The CCM Youth Ballet Companies feature talented students from ages nine through adult, performing traditional and contemporary works choreographed by CCM and CCM Prep faculty.
Location:
Patricia Corbett Theater
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


2 and 5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14
• CCM Ensemble-in-Residence •
SONGS OF LIGHT
Cincinnati Youth Choir
Robyn Lana, music director

The Cincinnati Youth Choir – including CCM resident choirs, ChoralQuest, Cincinnati Choral Academy and CYC parent choir – perform holiday songs from around the globe.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium Great Hall (Room 465) of UC’s Tangeman University Center
Tickets: Prices start at $19.50; student and group discounts available. Buy tickets online.


3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15
Cincinnati Junior Strings
Rachel Bierkan, director

Cincinnati Junior Strings features the area’s premiere string players, ages 10-14, performing a variety of traditional, contemporary and multi-cultural string orchestra music.
Location:
Corbett Auditorium Patricia Corbett Theater
Admission: FREE


Event Information

All events listed above take place in CCM Village on UC’s campus unless otherwise indicated. Admission is free to many CCM performances, although some events do require purchased tickets or reservations. Please see individual event information for details and ordering information. Repertoire and dates are subject to change.

Visit ccm.uc.edu or contact the CCM Box Office at 513-556-4183 for the most current event information.

Inclement Weather Policy: In the event of inclement weather conditions, CCM will handle the cancellation of events and performances as follows: if the University of Cincinnati is closed, all CCM performances on that day will be cancelled.

Purchasing Tickets

Experiencing the magic of CCMONSTAGE has never been easier! Purchase your tickets:

  • Online at ccmonstage.universitytickets.com
  • Over the phone at 513-556-4183
  • In person at the CCM Box Office in the Atrium of UC’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts.

Ticket discounts are available for UC and non-UC students and groups.

CCM’s Box Office is open Mon-Fri from 12:30-6 p.m., Sat. from 12-4 p.m. and one hour prior to curtain for ticketed performances. Hours subject to change based on the University of Cincinnati calendar.

CCM Student Ticket Options

Advance Sales

Want to guarantee your seat? Current CCM students can purchase up to two tickets for each 2019-20 CCMONSTAGE concert and production at the discounted rate of just $5 per ticket. Tickets must be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office. A valid student ID is required. 

Rush Tickets

Current CCM students also have the opportunity to attend most CCMONSTAGE events at no charge through student rush. CCM student rush tickets become available two days before each concert performance and one hour prior to the start of each theatre arts (dance, plays, musicals, opera) performance. CCM student rush tickets subject to availability. Tickets must be requested in person at the CCM Box Office. A valid student ID is required.

Other restrictions may apply. Inquire at the CCM Box Office for full details.

Parking and Directions

Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. CCMONSTAGE patrons can order prepaid parking at $8 for each fall performance selected. Prepaid parking is date/performance specific. CCM Garage parking rates for fall performances or special events is usually available for $8-$15.

The CCM Garage is managed by UC Parking Services. For additional information on parking at UC, please visit uc.edu/parking. To provide feedback or comments, please call 513-556-2283 during business hours.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/parking/visitors-maps. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.


Sponsors and Partners

CCM recognizes and thanks the following corporations, foundations and individuals for their generous support:

Louise Dieterle Nippert Trust
Scholarship and Resident Artist Sponsor

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
CCM/CSO Diversity Fellowship Sponsor

The Corbett Endowment at CCM
Dance Department Supporter
All-Steinway School Sponsor

ArtsWave
Wayne Ferguson Family Foundation
Louise H. & David S. Ingalls Foundation, Inc.
Community Partners

The Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, Ritter & Randolph, LLC, Corporate Counsel
Visiting Artists & Thinking About Music Sponsor 

Dr. & Mrs. Carl Fischer
Macy’s
CCMONSTAGE Production Sponsors

Elizabeth C. B. & Paul G. Sittenfeld
Musical Theatre Showcase Sponsor 

Genevieve Smith
Opera Production Sponsor

Anonymous
Estate of Mr. William A. Friedlander
Mrs. William A. Friedlander
Dr. Randolph L. Wadsworth
Mr. & Mrs. J. David Rosenberg
Mr. & Mrs. Harry H. Santen
Elizabeth C. B. & Paul G. Sittenfeld
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Stegman
Dr. & Mrs. Theodore W. Striker
Mrs. Harry M. Hoffheimer
Ariel Quartet Sponsors 

Jan Rogers
Willard and Jean Mulford Charitable Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation
Choral Studies Sponsors 

Ms. Margaret A. Straub & Mr. Neil R. Artman
Collaborative Piano Sponsor

Robert & Debra Chavez
Three Arts Scholarship Fund
DIGS
CCMpower Partners 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph W. Hirschhorn
Orchestral Sponsor

Mr. & Mrs. James L. Miller
Musical Theatre Production Sponsor

Graeter’s Ice Cream
Greg Mathein
Musical Theatre Performance Sponsors

Trish & Rick Bryan
CCMpower
The CCM Harmony Fund: Challenging Hate and Prejudice through Performing Arts
The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation
The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile, Jr./ U.S. Bank Foundation
Jeff Thomas Catering
Event Sponsors 

Rafael & Kimberly Daniel de Acha Foundation
Voice Sponsor

The Sarah Marvin Foundation for the Performing Arts
Classical Guitar Sponsor

 

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News CCMONSTAGE Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Acting Presents New Play ‘Association of Controlled Dreamers’

Admission to the play is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, April 22, 2019.

CCM concludes its 2018-19 Studio Series with MJ Kaufman’s Association of Controlled Dreamers on April 25-27, 2019, in Cohen Family Studio Theater.

In the play, a young, charismatic senator pursues policies that could have long-lasting repercussions for public education. A group of college students tries every technique available to them to change his mind, from occupying his lawn to collective lucid dreaming.

“The play is about students fighting for affordable education,” says Brant Russell, the show’s director. “The play also resonates with our current political and educational circumstances in that many college students feel as though they have little power over the institutions that rule their worlds. If students wish to be heard, they sometimes have to resort to less traditional means of communication.”

CCM commissioned Kaufman, who is a staff writer on Netflix’s The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, to write Association of Controlled Dreamers for the college’s summer Playwrights Workshop in 2017. Students presented a reading of the play as part of the workshop, but now audiences can see the fully-staged version.

While the subject matter addresses serious and modern societal concerns, Russell notes that the production doesn’t lose its humor. “The play is funny (really funny), moving, and relies on what’s best about CCM: students collaborating to create something greater than the sum of its parts.”

Performances of Association of Controlled Dreamers take place April 25-27, 2019, in CCM’s Cohen Family Studio Theater.

Admission is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, April 22. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.
­­­____________________

Creative Team

  • Brant Russell, director
  • Andrew Wright, lighting designer
  • Hannah Gruneisen, master electrician
  • Maya Hughes, assistant master electrician/board operator
  • Will Graham, stage manager
  • Cole Nevins, assistant stage manager
  • Leah Berry, production assistant
  • Emma Heath, production assistant
  • Ryan Hurt, sound designer
  • Dan DeGroh, composer/musician

Cast List

  • Rin Wallace as Brittany
  • Annie Jacques as Tara
  • Paige Jordan as Vera
  • Zoe Cotzias as Amber
  • Michelle Jardine as Amaryllis
  • Madison Pullman as Mary
  • Amanda Nelson as Mother
  • Briley Oakley as Social Media
  • Sierra Coachman as Secret Girlfriend
  • Cameron Nalley as Sammy
  • Jason Pavlovich as Tom
  • Reid Robison as Edward
  • Matt Fox as Senator/Twin
  • Frankie Chuter as Job Man
  • Sydney Miles as Rhonda/Hope

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Thursday, April 25
  • 8 p.m. Friday, April 26
  • 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, April 27

Location
Cohen Family Studio Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Admission is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, April 22. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____________________

Acting Studio Series Sponsor: Neil Artman and Margaret Straub

Story by CCM Graduate Student Jonathan Dellinger

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Offers Arts Classes to all UC Students in Fall 2019

 

CCM offers dozens of different general studies and fine arts elective courses in fall 2019. These credit-granting courses are open to all UC students and cover a wide range of topics including dance, movies and media, music and theatre arts!

Master the hip-hop dance moves seen in current music videos or learn the basics of modern dance and ballet in CCM’s dance classes. Film a digital video or binge-watch classic movies, Disney animated musicals and TV sitcoms in movie and media appreciation classes.

CCM’s music appreciation classes cover the music of Woodstock, The Beatles, Japanese Pop and more, or students can study women’s impact on music and the impact of music on politics. Students can also join UC Choruses or UC Symphony Orchestra, turn their laptops into musical instruments and jam with a virtual band, or learn how to play the piano and guitar in hands-on music performance classes.

In theatre appreciation classes students can study the history of theatre, explore how Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton revolutionized musical theatre, learn the craft of acting or stage design and more!

CCM’s fall 2019 arts elective classes are offered online or in person; view a complete list of class offerings below. Register for classes at https://www.catalyst.uc.edu.

Dance Performance Classes

Advanced Intermediate Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1020-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 2-3:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This course is intended for non-Dance majors with prior training in classical ballet at the advanced/intermediate level. It is repeatable and is offered each semester. The ballet class will consist of a traditional ballet barre followed by center practice and enchainment following the usual progression. A preexisting knowledge of the ballet French terminology is required in addition to the physical mastery and overall knowledge of classical ballet expected at the advanced/intermediate level.
_____

Beginning Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1015-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
FAM 1015-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 7:30-8:50 p.m.)
FAM 1015-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 2-3:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is an introductory course for any non-major wishing to learn the fundamentals of classical ballet technique. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women/ white T-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men) learning the essentials of a traditional classical ballet class. We will study the French terminology associated with the movement and poses we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form including historical perspective, origin and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.
_____

Ballet Conditioning for Athletes and Dance Team (3 credits)
FAM 1019-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 8-9:20 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is a beginning level ballet course designed especially for athletes and dance team members. As well as focusing on increasing the skill and artistry level within the parameters of classical ballet, the student will also learn to understand the historical perspectives of the art form and the value it has to the culture of society. Within the framework of the traditional ballet class, students will focus on developing strong core muscles, as well as lengthening and toning the body with additional mat work and conditioning exercises, as part of the conditioning program. Daily proper attire is expected for this class. Exercise bands and mat or towel are also required.
_____

Beginning Modern Dance I (3 credits)
FAM 1025-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

In this course for non-dance majors, students are introduced to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values.
_____

Dance Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1095-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

This online course introduces dance as a performing art, focusing on the Western European and American dance forms of Ballet, Modern and Contemporary. The course will trace their development, historical development and cultural characteristics. Additional course topics will include viewing live dance performances.
_____

Hip Hop Dance (1 credits)
FAM 1030-001 (Monday, 5:30-6:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

A beginning/intermediate level dance course with no experience required. This class is designed to teach the fundamentals of Hip-Hop through choreographed dances. Hip-Hop style similar to that seen on current music videos will be the style taught in class. Individual work, floor work and partner work will be emphasized. Combinations will be performed to Rap and R & B music.
_____

Intermediate Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1017-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is a ballet course designed for dancers with previous ballet training. It is a repeatable course for the non-major wishing to further pursue the complexities and artistic nuances of classical ballet technique. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women/ white T-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men) learning the essentials of a traditional classical ballet class. We will study the French terminology associated with more complex movement and positions we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form including historical perspective, origin and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.
_____

Intermediate Modern Dance I (3 credits)
FAM 1027-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:05-10 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

A one semester, repeatable (by audition or permission of instructor) course for non-dance majors, providing a more sophisticated approach to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will also continue to explore and further develop fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the cultivation of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool within our society.
_____

Legends of Dance – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1094-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This course introduces dance legends of Ballet, Modern and Contemporary Dance, their significant contribution to the world of dance in America, as well as the passion and insight that brought the legends to their height of success. Additional course topics include viewing live dance performances.
_____

Modern Dance Basics – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1022-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

In this course for non-dance majors, students are introduced to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values. Through interactive online instruction students use recording devices (e.g., smartphones, laptops, and camcorders) to develop their dance technique while building a dance community. To complete assignments students may film the dances with friends and/or family in locations of their choosing. (e.g., dorm room, apartment, basement, backyard, park, and riverside). Students may also utilize the 414 Video Production Room in Langsam Library.
_____

Movie and Media Appreciation Classes

Art of Recording (3 credits)
FAM 1050-001 (Monday, 4:30-7:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy

Art of Recording focuses on the basic technical musical understanding needed to engage music at progressively deeper levels of understanding. Starting from simple listening experiences you will soon be able to appreciate what it means to be an “expert listener.” A musician learns the function musical scales; a painter, the knowledge paint and brushes; a writer, the craft of words and sentences. The expert listener integrates specific gateways that can reveal the depths of sound possibilities. This course expresses the Art of Recording from basic sound physics, music and brain functions as they pertain to the technology used in producing the popular music we love over the last five decades.
_____

Digital Audio for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2007-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking KI Knowledge Integration

This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of digital audio theory and practices through the development of basic digital audio production projects. Course topics include general production principles and theory of operation of digital audio workstations with an emphasis placed on internet radio, podcast, and commercial production processes. The student will be introduced to basic audio production techniques through the corresponding laboratory phase of this course. The student will be required to demonstrate knowledge of the principles of audio production and apply those principles in laboratory exercises. Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Have taken the following Courses EMDT1011C min grade D-, or EMED1005 min grade D-, or EMED1015 min grade D-.
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Digital Video for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2002-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas:  CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking KI Knowledge Integration

The medium of digital video has become an increasingly pervasive means of communication in contemporary culture. Digital Video allows students to apply media aesthetic theory, processes and techniques in communicating their ideas to a specified audience via the digital video production process. While taking this course, each student is required to write, produce, shoot, and edit several projects using digital video cameras, working in a digital nonlinear editing environment, and delivering their content through a variety of digital distribution channels to a specified audience. Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Have taken the following Courses EMDT1011C min grade D-, or EMED1006 min grade D-, or EMED1016 min grade D-.
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Disney Animated Musicals (3 credits)
FAM 2090-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:50 p.m.; Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.)
FAM 2090-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.; Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course explores the genre of the animated film musical with a special emphasis on its presumed originator, the Walt Disney Studios. We will consider the unique expressive properties of this form, examining the ways in which both song and the animated medium distort, rearrange, and reflect the world for its audiences. As we trace the genre’s history and evolution from the earliest experiments with sound technology to the latest multi-billion-dollar franchises, we will simultaneously track shifting trends in popular song and film. This history will run alongside discussions of Disney’s complex and often problematic roles as a purveyor of American and global entertainment.
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Foundations of Digital Media (3 credits)
DMC 1000-001 (Monday, 2-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Introduces the field of Digital Media and Cinematic Arts, the faculty who teach it and the professionals who practice it. Faculty members will present their research and relate that topic to the wider field of Digital Media and Cinematic Arts. Professionals will present their work and relevant projects. This course encourages students to clarify their course of study and build connections with faculty, professionals and students with similar interests.
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Going to the Movies: 20th Century Classics (3 Credits)
EMED 1075-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Through lectures and screenings of classic films students will explore the evolution of the motion picture as a unique and significant form of expression. The course includes investigation into film style and structure, distribution and consumption. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination.
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Integrated Media Production 1 for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 1015-001 (Online)
EMED 1015-002 (Monday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: TI Technology and Innovation, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy

Media convergence is a vital component of our new media culture. In new media there is a melding of production, design and message with user-experience. Integrated Media Production I is an introductory course — the first of a two-course sequence within the E-Media major at CCM — that provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation in the intersecting worlds of digital media production, content development and new media design. This course is an overview of concepts and processes in convergent media production.
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Jammin’ with Laptops (3 credits)
FAM 2014-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-noon)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration
This course will explore the potentials of laptop computers for music making. Various technical topics, including analog v. digital sound, audio software, effects, gear, MIDI and audio programming languages will be surveyed. In addition, a survey of the history of computer music will be conducted by way of an investigation into seminal readings and recordings. Both of these inquiries will provide participants.
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Jammin’ with Laptops – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, SR Social Responsibility
In this course, you will play, record, and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session; Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2), and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3 In the Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments, and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the Midterm Exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In the Unit 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In the Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1~2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In the Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2~4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the Final Exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.
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Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime, and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music, and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.
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The Evolution of the Television Comedy (3 credits)
EMED 1050-001 (Wednesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HU Humanities and Literature, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Through lectures and screenings of classic scenes and episodes, students will explore the American television comedy as a significant form of storytelling, as a uniquely elastic form of expression and contemporary critique, and as an exceptionally creative and influential art. The course includes investigation into comedy and sitcom style and structure, as well as historical and societal context and impact. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination. This course is focused in the historical and cultural development of television comedies from their pre-TV origins to their contemporary manifestations. Students will develop the strategies for reading media properly while also investigating the historical, literary, cultural and aesthetic contributions of television to 20th and 21st century art forms.
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Music Appreciation Classes

American Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2006-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking
An online history of music in America c. 1620 to the present. Musical life as we experience it in the USA today is the product of a history that is in many ways unique, but never far from world-wide influences. This course surveys a wide variety of music along with the social, political, and religious movements that have shaped American musical life right up to the present. Examines the contributions of numerous cultural groups, regional developments over four centuries, and the ways music reflects values, aspirations, and problems of the population. Course topics include musical genres, styles, personalities, and trends. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, and videos are all online. No prior experience with music required.
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Experimental Rock ‘60s and ‘70s (3 credits)
FAM 2013-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30-2:50 p.m.)
FAM 2013-002 (Online: 8/26-10/15, 1st half semester)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

This course will provide a detailed overview of the tools, techniques and musical styles which had a tremendous impact on the aesthetic of various genres of Rock Music in the 1960s and 70s, the resonance of which can be observed in many mainstream and non-mainstream musical trends of the last 30 years. It will begin with an examination of multi-tracking tape machines: their development and techniques such as sound on sound, tape-delay and flange, which had become standard practice in studios by the late 1960s. This is followed by a technical overview of electronic instruments, specifically the synthesizer, whose development will be traced from the Theremin. Musical trends such as the 1950s avant-garde and Minimalism will serve as a bridge to examinations of seminal bands such as the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Kraftwerk, Can, Neu:, Brian Eno and the Talking Heads among others; the technical knowledge gained from the initial lectures on tape techniques and electronic instruments will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the music of these artists.
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Hamilton: A Musical Theatre Revolution (3 credits)
FAM 2075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, has been credited as revolutionary and a game changer in the history of the American musical since its off-Broadway opening in 2015. This course explores the revolutionary aspect of this musical, covering song and plot conventions of musical theater as they appear in musicals from the 1920s to the present and investigating how Miranda employs, challenges, and transforms them in Hamilton. We will also consider Hamilton among other “history musicals,” its relationship with popular music (especially hip-hop and socio-political issues of race and ethnicity derived from Miranda’s choice to offer a multi-racial cast to represent the Founding Fathers. We will thus contextualize Hamilton in musical theater history and investigate what aspects of the musical are conventional and which ones are original.
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History of Rock ‘n’ Roll – Online (3 Credits)
FAM 3031-001
FAM 3031-002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Rock and Roll had humble beginnings in the Southeastern United States, but over time it developed into a force, beyond mere entertainment, that has defined youth culture on a global scale. Rock and roll culture is embedded in the fabric of youth identity. Rock and roll music is a commodity that young people use daily, often with an obsessive devotion. Marketing campaigns that target youth are so relentless that young people are under enormous media and social pressure to join the ranks of consumers. The goal of History of Rock and Roll is, therefore, threefold: 1. To provide for students a chronological survey that examines the relationship between the music, its most successful and colorful artists, the associated recording technology, and the impact of the genre on American culture. 2. Through critical listening and reading, the course will provide students with useful, evaluative tools so that they can make historically informed and thoughtful decisions about the music they select and enjoy. 3. Finally, the course will encourage students to seek and appreciate new styles, and perhaps inspire those who seek a career as a pop music artist. No prerequisite.
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Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime, and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music, and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.
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Jazz Appreciation (3 credits)
FAM 2051-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
FAM 2051-002 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

A one-semester overview of America’s true art form: jazz. The course will introduce students to the various styles of jazz, its major performers, its history and origins, and will also involve attending jazz performances at CCM or elsewhere.
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Live at CCM (2-3 credits)
FAM 1060-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

Through this course, students will have the opportunity to experience concerts at CCM in a directed environment. Learn about a broad range of music and style through exposure to a wide variety of instrumental ensembles. Attend orchestral, wind ensemble, choral, jazz and contemporary music programs and more with the chance to discuss and write about them through interaction with knowledgeable graduate assistants and the directors of the respective ensembles themselves.
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Music and Politics (3 credits)
FAM 2018-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 11:15-12:35 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration
This course examines the impact of music on politics during the last 100 years in the contemporary classical realm, as well as folk and popular musical styles. Students will become familiar with prominent politically influenced musicians and composers such as Fela Kuti, Woody Guthrie, Bob Marley, and Frederic Rzewski. Also, this class will cover the impact on music from major political and historical events throughout the century, such as World War II’s influence on jazz, or the life and career of Dmitri Shostakovich under Stalin’s Soviet Union. By studying the biographies and major works of this broad spectrum of musicians, students will be able to outline the diverse characteristics of politically oriented music.
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Music Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2005-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and culture, CM Effective Communication

An online course that introduces students to a wide range of music in the Western World, covering several historical periods, including our own time. Examines musical styles, musical terms, composers, and other aspects of the music listening experience. Considers the historical and cultural context of musical activity and the way it has shaped the musical life from medieval Europe up to the present in our own communities. Students will discuss their own experiences with music and have the opportunity to attend a musical performance of their choice, near where they live, for class credit. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, videos, and film are all online. No prior experience with music required.
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Music of the Beatles (3 credits)
FAM 2061-001 (Online)
FAM 2061-002 (Online)
FAM 2061-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

The Music of the Beatles has made an impact in the whole world both musically and sociologically. The Beatles are considered one of the most influential bands of any era. Their music reflects the cultural and social revolution of the 1960s and serves as a model for understanding all subsequent popular music. This class will chronologically trace the development of the Beatles from their early days through the band’s dissolution. There will be analysis of selected compositions with regard to lyrics, harmony, song structure, instrumentation, and arranging. This class will examine their groundbreaking production techniques, individual writing styles, and the impact of their music on other musicians and social trends.
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Music of Woodstock (3 credits)
FAM 2070-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

The course thoroughly examines the musical artists and the works they performed at history’s most iconic pop music festival, Woodstock (officially the “Woodstock Music and Art Fair”). As many as half a million people or more, descending on a dairy farm in upstate New York in August of 1969 for “three days of peace and music,” were treated to a wildly diverse lineup of musicians and artists hailing from no less than five different continents. The Woodstock Festival is the perfect prism through which to view the 1960s popular scene, when various streams of musical genres converged to forge a new breed of “pop”; the soundtrack of the counterculture and a young, idealistic generation. How did a music festival, let alone pop music in general, become a catalyst for social, political, and artistic change and upheaval? How was the motley assortment of musicians of various stripes, genres, genders, and ethnicities received by the crowd, temporarily the fourth-largest city in New York? How did this crowd co-exist and survive without virtually any of the realities that plague a similar-sized urban center? These are just a few of the many questions posed in this course as we study and—equally as important—savor and experience the musical performances of the 1969 Woodstock Festival.
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Talking about Music (3 credits)
FAM 1102-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 3:35-4:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
This course will explore contemporary musical topics through dialogue and reflection. Themed weeks will investigate the intersection of philosophy, aesthetics, and culture as they pertain to the musical experience. Within these three broad concepts, diverse topics (posed as questions) will range from the existential (What is Music?) to the social (Where do you find music?) to the economic (What is a fair way to pay creators for their music?). All are designed to focus and enrich the musical experience, while broadening student awareness of the music industry and endeavoring to answer questions that don’t fit neatly into traditional music course contexts. Students will journal their reflections on these discussions, culminating in a final project, either written or practical.
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Understanding Music for Non-Majors (3 credits)
FAM 1100-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
The appreciation of music is enhanced by a deeper knowledge of musical materials and structures. This introductory course will focus on reading and writing music in treble, bass, and C-clefs; using rhythms as complicated as triplets in simple and compound meters; recognizing intervals and chords; and understanding basic forms used in popular and classical music. The skills learned in this course will provide the basis for further study and understanding of music of all genres.
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What’s Hot in Popular Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2062-001
FAM 2062-002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: DC Diversity and Culture, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

This online course examines current popular music in its trending styles and genres. Students will critique selected songs from the weekly “Billboard” charts and various other media resources, including You Tube and digital download statistics, and consider both the hottest artists as well as promising up-and-comers. Students will develop skills for evaluating artistic intent with respect to lyrics, some basic literary techniques, melody, harmony, rhythm, song form, and psychology, and with a look at cutting edge production techniques. Students will identify and compare unique composing and performing styles of today’s artists and identify links between the music business and societal trends. Weekly activity will include reading, viewing, and listening to examples online and completing assignments on Canopy. No prerequisite. No textbook.
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Women in Music (3 credits)
FAM 2025-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11:15 a.m.-12:10 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

Women in Music is an historical survey of women’s lives and accomplishments in Western music from the medieval period to the present time. The course includes women of diverse races, classes and cultures, and the historical issues that impacted or limited their work. An examination of women’s roles as composers, performers, and patrons reveals their achievements that have been largely ignored because of their gender. Furthermore, although the cultural and societal values change over time and geographic locations, it is evident that suppression and exploitation are recurring themes with regard to social status, education, economics, politics, religion or racial prejudice.
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Music Performance Classes

Classical Guitar Class (2 credits)
GTAR 1075-001 (U)
GTAR 6075-001 (G)
Tuesday/Thursday 12:20-1:15 p.m.
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking
Applied course in basic guitar skills. Emphasis on playing classical and folk styles. Review of current published methods and materials. Open to non-CCM students. Course repeats each semester. Students provide their own nylon string guitars.
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Group Piano I Non-majors (2 credits)
PIAN 1001-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:05-10:00 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-004 (Tuesday/Thursday, 1:25-2:20 p.m.)
PIAN 1001-005 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

Designed for those with little or no piano experience; teaches the fundamentals of reading music, playing by ear, using chord charts, and improving finger flexibility.
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Jammin’ with Laptops (3 credits)
FAM 2014-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-noon)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration
This course will explore the potentials of laptop computers for music making. Various technical topics, including analog v. digital sound, audio software, effects, gear, MIDI and audio programming languages will be surveyed. In addition, a survey of the history of computer music will be conducted by way of an investigation into seminal readings and recordings. Both of these inquiries will provide participants.
_____

Jammin’ with Laptops – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, SR Social Responsibility
In this course, you will play, record, and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session; Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2), and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3 In the Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments, and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the Midterm Exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In the Unit 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In the Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1~2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In the Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2~4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the Final Exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.
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Piano Lead Sheet Non-majors (3 credits)
PIAN 1003-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11:15-12:10 p.m.)
PIAN 1003-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Students will learn how to play piano parts of popular idiom piano pieces. They will learn how to realize chord “lead” sheets and also listen to music to pick up piano accompaniment styles. Learning to read music is not part of this course, although you will learn to read rhythm charts. Music will be chosen from artists such as Coldplay, Rihanna, Bruno Mars, as well as earlier works by Chicago, Motley Crue and John Lennon. Choices will be made depending on the type of accompaniment style you are learning.
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UC Cabaret Singers (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1082 (Monday/Wednesday, 6-7:30 p.m.)

The UC Cabaret Singers seeks to enrich the university experience by providing quality musical experiences for UC students within the context of performance of a variety of choral idioms. Members of the UC Choruses work towards excellence in musical performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensemble regularly performs on campus, locally, and on national tours.
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UC Men’s Chorus (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1081 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 4-5:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses seek to enrich the university experience by providing students a wide range of aesthetic experiences, introducing them to a variety of musical styles, helping them gain appreciation for tonal sounds, and making connections between music and their own personal lives. Members of the UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses will work toward excellence in performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensembles regularly perform on campus, locally and on annual national tours.
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UC Symphony Orchestra (0-1 credit)
ENSM 2091 (Tuesday, 8-10 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Symphony Orchestra is specifically for and is designed to provide students with an opportunity to rehearse and perform great orchestral repertoire. Membership in the orchestra is open to instrumentalists who own their own instrument, have a basic technical proficiency, and the ability to read music. Specific seating assignments in the orchestra are determined by informal auditions at the start of each quarter.
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UC Women’s Chorus (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1085 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 4-5:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses seek to enrich the university experience by providing students a wide range of aesthetic experiences, introducing them to a variety of musical styles, helping them gain appreciation for tonal sounds, and making connections between music and their own personal lives. Members of the UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses will work toward excellence in performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensembles regularly perform on campus, locally and on annual national tours.
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Voice Class (1-2 credits)
VOIC 1075-001 (Thursday, 2-2:55 p.m.)
VOIC 1075-002 (Tuesday, 4-4:55 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Voice Class is intended to impart the rudiments of classical vocal technique. Topics addressed include breathing for singing, phonation, anatomy of the breathing process, anatomy of the larynx, posture, vowel formation, and characteristics of consonant sounds. The class will culminate in the student performing a song in English.
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Theatre Appreciation Classes

Acting for Non-Majors (3 credits)
FAM 1001-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 1-2:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-002 (Monday/Wednesday, 6-7:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-003 (Monday/Wednesday, 4-5:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-004 (Monday/Wednesday, 2:30-3:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

An introductory course in the craft of acting designed for University students interested in theatre performance. Students will work on unscripted material in group improvisations and scripted material in the presentation of monologues or scenes. Basic actor vocabulary common to all styles of performance will be taught.
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Hamilton: A Musical Theatre Revolution (3 credits)
FAM 2075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, has been credited as revolutionary and a game changer in the history of the American musical since its off-Broadway opening in 2015. This course explores the revolutionary aspect of this musical, covering song and plot conventions of musical theater as they appear in musicals from the 1920s to the present and investigating how Miranda employs, challenges, and transforms them in Hamilton. We will also consider Hamilton among other “history musicals,” its relationship with popular music (especially hip-hop and socio-political issues of race and ethnicity derived from Miranda’s choice to offer a multi-racial cast to represent the Founding Fathers. We will thus contextualize Hamilton in musical theater history and investigate what aspects of the musical are conventional and which ones are original.
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Introduction to Arts Administration for Non-Majors (4 credits)
AADM 5160-001 (U)
AADM 6060-001 (G)
Monday/Wednesday, 9:05-10:45 a.m.
This course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of American not-for-profit arts administration/management. The course opens with an introduction to the not-for-profit profit sector. The not-for-profit arts sector is then examined in this context. The second section of the course consists of an overview of the principles and practice of not-for-profit arts administration/management. The topics of mission, governance and leadership, human resources, strategic and financial management and the development of revenue resources to support mission are covered. Through readings, lectures and class discussions, students will apply those principles to the case study of an actual organization and, time permitting, will model the creation of an organizational plan outline for a small not-for-profit performing arts organization.
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Introduction to Stage Lighting and Sound (3 credits)
THPR 1020C-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

In this course, the student will learn hands on skills with lighting and sound equipment, while discovering the ways in which modern technology can be effectively applied as a key production element in drama, musical theatre, opera and dance. Through experiences both practical and theoretical, each student will gain operational skills, and recognize the importance of teamwork and collaboration in creating art and discovering a personal aesthetic.
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Stage Lighting Lab and Crew for Non-Majors (1-2 credits)
THPR 1018C-001 (Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Practical production undergraduate crew work in the execution of stage lighting designs for major opera, musical theatre, dance and dramatic productions. Each student will practice their understanding in accomplishing the execution of a realized lighting design project(s). Non-typical work session hours required (evening and weekends) for installation and running crews for productions. May be repeated for credit.
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Theatre History for Non-Majors (3 credits)
DRPF 2054 001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11:15-12:10 p.m.)
DRPF 2054 002 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives, CT Critical Thinking

History of Theatre is a chronological look at the rise of Western theatre from ancient times to the Renaissance. The course examines how theatre emerges, its dramatic structure, styles of acting, various visual elements, and different production techniques. The course also explores how theatre artisans built upon the experiences of one another, introduces key figures from theatre history and shows how theatre continues to influence us today.
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Registration Information

UC students can register for classes online at https://www.catalyst.uc.edu.

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