Logo for the Opera Fusion: New Works program.

CCM, Cincinnati Opera Co-host Free Performance of ‘Intimate Apparel’ Nov. 14

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) and Cincinnati Opera’s Opera Fusion: New Works program presents a free performance of excerpts from new American opera Intimate Apparel at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, November 14 in the Cincinnati Club’s Oak Room.

'Bright Eyed Joy!' composer Ricky Ian Gordon.

‘Intimate Apparel’ composer Ricky Ian Gordon.

Tickets are available now though the Cincinnati Opera box office by calling 513-241-2742 or visiting cincinnatiopera.org.

Opera Fusion: New Works is currently providing a 10-day workshop for Intimate Apparel, which is composed by Ricky Ian Gordon to a libretto by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lynn Nottage. The new opera is commissioned by The Metropolitan Opera/Lincoln Center Theater’s New Works Program.

The workshop is directed by Robin Guarino, CCM’s J. Ralph Corbett Distinguished Chair, and conducted by Timothy Myers, the artistic and music director of North Carolina Opera. Paul Cremo, dramaturg and director of opera commissioning programs for the Metropolitan Opera, will be the dramaturg for the workshop.

lynn-nottage

‘Intimate Apparel’ playwright, Lynn Nottage.

Adapted by Nottage from her prize-winning 2003 play of the same name, Intimate Apparel tells the story of Esther, a 35-year-old seamstress in 1905 New York City. Esther sews lingerie for a living, interacting with a wealthy Fifth Avenue wife, a Tenderloin prostitute, and a Jewish fabric merchant on the Lower East Side, with whom she shares a closeness that cannot be pursued further because of his religion. Esther embarks on a letter-writing relationship with a Panama Canal laborer, leading to marriage and ultimately heartbreak, but she maintains her strength of character and determination to make a better life for herself.

Learn more about Intimate Apparel at cincinnatiopera.org.

About Opera Fusion: New Works

Funded by a generous grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Opera Fusion: New Works is a groundbreaking joint program of Cincinnati Opera and the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music created in 2011 to foster the development of new American operas. The program offers composers or composer/librettist teams the opportunity to workshop an opera during a 10-day residency in Cincinnati, utilizing the talent, personnel and facilities of both organizations. The workshops are cast with a combination of CCM students and professional artists, and each workshop concludes with a public performance. The program is led by co-artistic directors Marcus Küchle, Director of Artistic Operations of Cincinnati Opera, and Robin Guarino, the J. Ralph Corbett Distinguished Chair of Opera at CCM. In 2015, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation renewed the program’s funding, allowing for a second cycle of six workshops over three years.

In 2011, Opera Fusion: New Works awarded its first workshop to composer Douglas J. Cuomo and librettist John Patrick Shanley in support of their new opera Doubt, which premiered at Minnesota Opera in January 2013. In 2012, Opera Fusion: New Works provided workshops for Champion, by composer Terence Blanchard and librettist Michael Cristofer, which premiered at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis in June 2013; and Morning Star, by composer Ricky Ian Gordon and librettist William M. Hoffman, which premiered at Cincinnati Opera in June 2015. In 2013, the residency went to Fellow Travelers, by composer Gregory Spears and librettist Greg Pierce, which premiered at Cincinnati Opera in June 2016. In 2014, the program invited composer Jake Heggie and librettist Terrence McNally to workshop Great Scott, which premiered at the Dallas Opera in October 2015. For the final workshop of the original six-workshop grant, the residency was awarded to Meet John Doe, with music and libretto by the late Daniel Catán. The first workshop of the second grant cycle was given in October 2015 to Shalimar the Clown, by composer Jack Perla and librettist Rajiv Joseph, which premiered at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis in June 2016.

Most recently Opera Fusion: New Works presented excerpts from new American opera Some Light Emerges on September 22, 2016. Composed by Laura Kaminsky to a libretto by Mark Campbell and Kimberly Reed, Some Light Emerges was originally inspired by the creation of Houston’s iconic Rothko Chapel by philanthropist and art collector Dominique de Menil.

Opera Fusion: New Works Lab Presents
Intimate Apparel
Composed by Ricky Ian Gordon
Libretto by Lynn Nottage
Co-artistic Directors Robin Guarino and Marcus Küchle
Robin Guarino, director
Paul Cremo, Dramaturg
Timothy Meyers, conductor

Performance Time
7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 14

Location

The Cincinnati Club’s Oak Room
30 Garfield Place, Cincinnati OH 45202

Reserving Tickets

Admission to Intimate Apparel is free, but reservations are required. Please contact the Cincinnati Opera box office for tickets by calling 513-241-2742 or visiting cincinnatiopera.org.
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CCM Season Presenting Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Opera Department Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Rosenthal

Opera Production Sponsor: Genevieve Smith

CCM News
CCM Drama major Bartley Booz in the E-Media short film 'Solitude.'

Third Annual CCM 48-Hour Film Festival Unites UC Students to Make Movies

It’s time once more for the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music’s 48-Hour Film Festival, which challenges teams of UC students to create a short film in only 48 hours.

The clock starts ticking at 7 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 18 when students are split into eight teams to create their short films. The festival culminates at 7 p.m. on Sunday, November 20 in a free public screening of each team’s film at UC’s MainStreet Cinema in the Tangeman University Center, which is adjacent to CCM.

Any UC student is invited to participate in the third annual festival. To join, students must submit an application to CCM Acting professor and Department Chair Richard Hess by 5 p.m. on Monday, November 14, 2016. All students who apply will be placed on a team. Visit the CCM website for application instructions.

Participants are randomly assigned to one of eight teams of about eight to ten students each. Each team is given a prop, a line of dialogue and a theme that must be present in the film, and then it’s off to the races. The resulting films will be approximately five minutes long.

While many of the participants are Electronic Media majors, all UC students are encouraged to participate. Last year, students from biomedical engineering to composition and marketing competed alongside CCM students. The festival needs more than just actors and directors; each team will ideally be outfitted with a sound engineer, a make-up artist, a film editor and a composer to write the score, as well as other personnel.

Some films and participants will win awards such as best film, best actor or actress, best editing and best cinematography. In 2015 Sunday, won four out of the five awards; the film is available to watch on YouTube (warning: mature language).

The general public is invited to the festival’s screening party at 7 p.m. on Monday, November 20. Films will be screened in UC’s MainStreet Cinema in the Tangeman University Center.

Performance Time
7 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 20

Location

MainStreet Cinema, Tangeman University Center
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Free, reservations are not required.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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Story by CCM graduate student Alexandra Doyle

CCM News E-Media Presents CCM Weekly
Through this new Diversity Fellowship Program, students will get to perform with the CSO while completing a graduate degree at CCM.

Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music Awarded $900,000 by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO) and University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) are honored to announce the two institutions are the combined recipient of a $900,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This grant will be used to pilot a groundbreaking collaborative fellowship program aimed at developing young, graduate-level musicians from underrepresented populations and preparing them for the professional orchestra world.

The CSO/CCM Diversity Fellowship Program responds to a need among American orchestras and professional music conservatories, which face issues of underrepresentation, and is driven by the mutual desire of the CSO and CCM to foster a more inclusive environment in the orchestral industry. Selected graduate school Fellows from underrepresented populations will participate in a specialized two-year program that is already garnering attention among leaders throughout the music world. This educational opportunity will consist of frequent performances with the CSO, focused mentorship by professional CSO musicians, and simultaneous enrollment in a master’s or artist diploma degree program at CCM where fellows will be guided by CCM’s illustrious faculty.

Learn more at Cincinnati.com.

Learn more at Cincinnati.com.

“We looked at the data and saw that only four percent of American orchestra musicians were African-American or Latino, a figure that is also reflected in conservatory settings,” said Trey Devey, CSO President. “The CSO and CCM felt it essential to address this issue head-on and provide life-changing experiences within a highly creative and multidisciplinary artistic environment for graduate-level musicians across the country.”

“There are many fine programs designed to address underrepresentation in our industry, but none of those experiences include both a major American symphony orchestra and a major conservatory. Together, CCM and the CSO will provide unparalleled experiential learning opportunities for young musicians on the verge of a professional career,” said CCM Dean Peter Landgren.

“CCM and the CSO are perfectly positioned for this initiative. Our organizations’ recent partnership with the Cincinnati World Piano Competition, our joint Conducting Fellowship, as well as the large number of CSO musicians who are CCM alumni and serve as CCM faculty, speak to the deep connections between our two institutions. As the birthplace of cooperative education, the University of Cincinnati also serves as the perfect backdrop for this new approach to professional mentorship for musicians,” said Mr. Landgren.

CCM's Concert Orchestra, performing at the annual Moveable Feast gala event.

CCM’s Concert Orchestra, performing at the annual Moveable Feast gala event.

How the Fellowship Works
The four-year pilot program, as funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will graduate two classes of up to five Fellows each through June 2019. Fellows will consist of graduate level string musicians who are simultaneously enrolled in CCM’s master’s or artist diploma degree programs. Each class of Fellows will include up to two violins, and one each of viola, cello and double bass. They will perform five weeks per season with the CSO in a progressive sequence of concert weeks based on program difficulty, with one week focused on community engagement and educational activities.

These Fellows will be provided with a unique support system built on intensive professional mentorship. In addition to the community formed with other Fellows, they will receive focused mentorship by CSO musicians, which includes advance coaching sessions prior to a rehearsal cycle, ongoing stand partner coaching throughout rehearsal weeks and post-performance feedback. There will also be structured time for non-performance related mentorship such as career counseling and audition preparation.

Additionally, Fellows will receive a CCM Fellowship Stipend and one time Graduate Dean’s Excellence Award, with opportunities for additional performing and non-performing community engagement activities through CCM, eight career development seminars including mock auditions and full tuition scholarships.

Application procedures and deadlines will be announced at a later date.

The Anticipated Impact
It is anticipated this new fellowship opportunity will attract talented young musicians from throughout the nation.

“I think I speak for all the musicians of the CSO, and particularly those of us who will be deeply involved in mentoring, that in seeking to identify and prepare more underrepresented musicians for orchestral auditions, we will be helping make American orchestras richer,” said Stacey Woolley, CSO violinist. “There is such a varied career path available to musicians in every facet of professional music, and fostering this awareness with the next generation will continue to serve orchestras and communities for decades to come.”

An alumnus of CCM, Landgren has a first-hand understanding of the life changing opportunities this new initiative will provide. “As a student at CCM, I had the rare privilege of performing as an extra musician with the CSO. That transformative learning experience led to my 29-year career as a musician with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra,” he explained. “When I returned to CCM as the Dean, developing a program to provide similar opportunities for tomorrow’s professional musicians became a driving priority.”

Both the CSO and CCM extend sincere gratitude to The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its extraordinary impact in making this Diversity Fellowship Program a reality.

“Without the extraordinary support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this groundbreaking new fellowship program simply wouldn’t be possible,” said Mr. Devey. “It advances the Orchestra’s already strong and award winning commitment to more inclusiveness, a goal we share with the community we serve.”

“This generous gift from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation will enhance the already world-class UC College-Conservatory of Music and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra by enabling a unique partnership between two great Cincinnati institutions,” said UC Foundation President Rodney Grabowski. “The collaboration is a great example of the university’s commitment to inclusion initiatives, focus on the cooperative education and dedication to the performing arts.”

For more information about about this historic announcement, check out Janelle Gelfand’s coverage on Cincinnati.com today and be sure to pick up the Sunday, July 19, edition of the Cincinnati Enquirer for the full story!

CCM News
The logo for CET's "arts Bridge" television program.

CET Spotlights Revolutionary New iPad App Developed by CCM and DAAP Faculty Members

Two University of Cincinnati faculty members will appear on local PBS member station CET at 6 p.m. this Saturday, July 18, to discuss a revolutionary new project that could change the world of psychiatry.

The CET program arts Bridge will feature CCM Assistant Professor of Electronic Media John Hebbeler and DAAP Assistant Professor of Design Emily Verba. The duo are developing an iPad application entitled Brain to Screen, which is a visual and auditory interactive tool for patients diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder as well as their psychotherapists.

The proposed app converges cross-disciplinary expertise in design, sound, psychology, neuroscience and software development in order to deliver immersive, interactive experiences. The Brain to Screen app works in conjunction with a biofeedback headset and allows patients complete control of all visuals and sounds on their iPad screen using only their brainwaves.

The two UC professors and co-investigators bring a great deal of professional experience and expertise to this ambitious project. Professor Hebbeler has over a decade of experience in sound, video and web production, and 10 years of teaching experience in a variety of production-based courses. His area of expertise is creating interactive trans-media compositions that integrate a wide range of technological devices. His focus in this project is the sound development of Brain to Screen, as well as its interaction with the biofeedback headset.

Meanwhile, Professor Verba brings several years of experience in the field of graphic design and design education to this empirical research project. Her area of expertise and research focus is data visualization — the simplified depiction of complex content for ease of understanding by the masses. She is spearheading the visualization of biofeedback headset data and the design of an interface for psychotherapists to access and interpret the information collected from the app.

The arts Bridge segment will also bring Hebbeler together with several current and former students from CCM’s Division of Electronic Media and UC Blue Ash’s Department of Electronic Media Communications. Alumnus Don Hancock (BFA Electronic Media, 2006) is producing the story, and Deshon Able (AAS Electronic Media Technology, 2013) acts as the production assistant; furthermore, current E-Media student Ari Kruger is also working at CET as an intern, writer and editor.

arts Bridge is a locally-produced program that is part of a unique public television collaboration. Features about Cincinnati area arts and artists are paired with stories from across the country. In addition, Cincinnati area segments from arts Bridge are made available to public television stations nationally, extending the reach of greater Cincinnati arts well beyond southwest Ohio.

For more information, please make sure to visit www.cetconnect.org/arts-bridge.

The Brain to Screen segment will premiere at 6 p.m. on Saturday, July 18, on CET (Channel 13 or 1013 on Time Warner Cable; Channel 48 on DirectTV). There will also be several repeat airings:

  • 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sunday, July 19 (Channel 16 Time Warner and Direct TV)
  • 8 a.m., 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Monday, July 20 (Channel 987 Time Warner)
  • 10 a.m., 3 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tuesday July 21 (Channel 987 Time Warner)

Learn more about CCM E-Media by visiting ccm.uc.edu/emedia.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Drama and E-Media Announce New Film Collaboration

We are thrilled to announce that CCM’s Department of Drama and Division of Electronic Media have launched a new collaborative project, which will bring original scripted films to CCM’s performance season beginning next spring!

Utilizing the expertise and resources of both programs, students will receive hands-on experience in the development of a new film by serving as screenwriters, actors, directors, cinematographers and film editors, as well as location scouts, prop masters, costume designers and more.

“This exciting new film project will allow CCM students to collaborate across departments in the creation of a new and original film,” explains CCM’s A.B., Dolly, Ralph and Julia Cohen Chair of Dramatic Performance Richard Hess. “Our students have artistic voices and artistic visions that they need to practice articulating. What a fantastic opportunity.”

Scripts for this project’s inaugural film were solicited from students in January and February of 2015, with submissions coming from not only CCM Drama and E-Media students, but also from students in McMicken College and UC Clermont.

CCM Drama student Owen Alderson.

CCM Drama student Owen Alderson.

This year’s winning submission – entitled Binary – was written by sophomore drama major Owen Alderson.

A coming of age tale set in a private boarding school in Massachusetts, Binary is the story of a character named Emmett as he begins to transition to his true self, Julia.

Binary will be cast, rehearsed and filmed in the fall of 2015. The film will be edited in the spring of 2016 and will have a special showing in April of 2016 at UC’s MainStreet Cinema.

Stay tuned to The Village News for more information on Binary‘s production.

CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Slideshows: Boeing Boeing

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This weekend is your final chance to see CCM Drama‘s co-production of the Tony Award-winning comedy Boeing Boeing with the Carnegie in Covington, Ky. Directed by CCM’s new Assistant Professor of Drama Brant Russell, this production runs through Sunday, Nov. 24.

In her CityBeat review, Stacy Sims declares, “This winning partnership brings an abundance of talent, youth, energy and physical comedy to the Carnegie’s Otto M. Budig Theater.”

Cincy Whimsy calls the show, “Quite possibly the most humorous play you will see all year” and the Adventure Mom Blog calls Boeing Boeing, “the perfect play to see after a stressful week.” Tickets are on sale now!

CCM News CCM Slideshows

CCM E-Media Presents Free Screening of ‘Gold Rush Expedition Race’ Film on April 24

CCM E-Media will host a debut screening of the documentary film Gold Rush Expedition Race at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 24 in the MainStreet Cinema of UC’s Tangeman University Center. Admission is free and open to the general public.

The screening of this hour long film will be preceded by a brief introduction and followed by a question and answer session with the student producers, camera operators and film editors.

Educationally grounded, professionally driven and student produced, the Gold Rush Expedition Race documentary is a collaborative film produced by an interdisciplinary group of students at UC working under the guidance of a professional television and film producer/director. Sponsored by the UC Forward Collaborative, the project involved 33 students from four academic programs at three colleges at the University of Cincinnati:

CCM News CCM Video Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Announces Partnership with Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and World Piano Competition

2012 World Piano Competition Gold Medal Winner Alexander Yakovlev.

2012 World Piano Competition Gold Medal Winner Alexander Yakovlev.

Cincinnati’s World Piano Competition, an annual classical piano competition featuring top performers from across the globe since 1956, is undergoing an expansion with two exciting new collaborations and instituting a variety of changes aimed at enhancing the quality of the event and making Cincinnati a truly world-class destination for classical piano performance.

Primary among the changes at the re-imagined competition, already a highly respected event, are partnerships with two of the city’s cultural cornerstones – the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO). Beginning with the July 2013 competition, finalists in the Artist Division will have the distinct honor of performing with the world-renowned CSO, made up of some of the world’s finest musicians and an ensemble that regularly collaborates with classical music’s premier performing artists. The performances featuring the finalists  will be led by CSO Associate Conductor Robert Treviño. The event will also move to CCM, one of the nation’s top performing and media arts conservatories, where the acclaimed faculty will oversee upgrades to the competition’s jury system.

Learn more about this exciting new partnership in today’s issue of the Cincinnati Enquirer.

CCM News

Two CCM Prep Violinists to Perform with Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra

Left to right: Christina Nam, Robert Treviño and Skye Park.

Left to right: Christina Nam, Robert Treviño and Skye Park.

On Tuesday, Feb. 19 and Wednesday, March 20, two students from the CCM Preparatory Department (CCM Prep) will perform the first movement of Bach’s concerto for two violins on the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s A Family of Strings program!

The students, Skye Park of Lexington, KY and Christina Nam of West Chester, OH, are from CCM’s Starling Preparatory String Project and are studying with CCM faculty member Kurt Sassmannshaus.

The concert is part of the CSO’s Young People’s Concerts series, and will feature CSO musicians under Associate Conductor Robert Treviño. Park and Nam performed the same work last summer at the Great Wall International Music Festival in Beijing and the performance was broadcast in November on NPR‘s From the Top.

CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Announces Collaboration With CET Cincinnati Public Television

CCM’s internationally acclaimed performing ensembles will be coming to a television near you courtesy of a new collaborative arrangement with CET, Cincinnati Public Television. CCM’s upcoming Monteverdi Masterworks (Nov. 28, 2012) and Mahler Marathon (March 2, 2013) concerts will be recorded for future broadcast on the CET Arts Channel, initiating an ongoing partnership between the two organizations.

“This was an idea that had ‘yes’ written all over it,” explains Peter Landgren, CCM Dean and Thomas James Kelly Professor of Music. “I know from my own experiences that performing for television cameras and live microphones brings you to a greater level of focus as a musician. This is an unparalleled opportunity for our students. I want to thank CET Executive Vice President and Station Manager Jack Dominic for initiating this partnership and for giving us this platform to showcase the talent of CCM.”

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