Rock out for summer credit at CCM.

Dance, Rock Out and Binge Watch for College Credit this Summer with CCM’s New Online Arts Elective Classes!

Do you need to fulfill your fine arts credits? Have you always wanted to learn to dance but couldn’t get over the stage fright? Do you have free time this summer to jam with a virtual band on your laptop or study the music of The Beatles, all while earning class credit?

This summer, you can complete your elective requirements online. UC’s College-Conservatory of Music offers 20 different general studies and fine arts elective courses during five different sessions this summer. These credit-granting courses cover a wide range of topics and are open to UC and non-UC students alike!

Online arts courses are just a click away: select a course type or session from the list below or visit ccm.uc.edu/summer/finearts to learn more!

Dance for summer credit at CCM. Jam for summer credit at CCM.
Binge watch for summer credit at CCM. Rock out for summer credit at CCM.

May-Mester: May 9 – 29
Full Summer Semester: May 9 – August 6
Session A: May 31 – July 3
Session E: June 22 – August 6
Session B: July 5 – August 6

Course Fees & Registration Info

May-Mester: May 9 – 29

JAPANESE POP, ANIME AND VIDEO GAME MUSIC – ONLINE
FAM 2050-001 | Credits: 3
Learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music (post 1980), including Anime theme songs, video game music and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, while also investigating the cultural differences between Japan and America.
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Summer Semester (Full): May 9 – August 6

MUSIC APPRECIATION – ONLINE
FAM 2005-002 | Credits: 3

Get introduced to a wide range of composers, compositions, musical styles and musical terms and will place these musical works in the historical and culture context of each period.
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MUSIC OF THE BEATLES – ONLINE
FAM 2061-001 & 002 | Credits: 3

The Music of the Beatles has made an impact throughout the world both musically and sociologically. Their music reflects the cultural and social revolution of the 1960s and serves as a model for understanding all subsequent popular music. This class chronologically traces the band’s development from the early days through their dissolution and examines their groundbreaking production techniques, writing styles and the impact their music had on other musicians and social trends.
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WHAT’S HOT IN POPULAR MUSIC – ONLINE
FAM 2062-001 & 002 | Credits: 3

Examine current popular music and its trending styles and genres. Students will critique selected songs from the weekly Billboard charts and various other media resources, considering both the hottest artists as well as promising up-and-comers. Students will identify and compare unique composing and performing styles of today’s artists and identify links between the music business and societal trends. Weekly activities include reading, viewing and listening to examples, as well as completing assignments online
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Session A: May 31 – July 3

INTEGRATED MEDIA PRODUCTION – ONLINE
EMED 1015-001 | Credits: 3

Integrated Media Production I is an introductory course that provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation in the intersecting worlds of digital media production, content development, and new media design. This course is an overview of concepts and processes in convergent media production.
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MODERN DANCE BASICS – ONLINE
DNCE 1022-001 | Credits: 3
This one semester, repeatable course for non-dance majors introduces the techniques and movement vocabulary for contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while developing improvisational and performance skills. They will also develop the perspectives necessary to critically analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values. Through interactive online instruction, students use recording devices (smartphones, laptops, camcorders, etc.) to develop their dance technique and build a dance community.
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GOING TO THE MOVIES – ONLINE
EMED 1075-001 | Credits: 3
Through lectures and screenings of classic films, students will explore the evolution of the motion picture as a unique and significant form of expression. The course includes investigation into film style, structure, distribution and consumption. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination.
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MUSIC APPRECIATION – ONLINE
FAM 2005-001 | Credits: 3
Get introduced to a wide range of composers, compositions, musical styles and musical terms and will place these musical works in the historical and culture context of each period.
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AMERICAN MUSIC – ONLINE
FAM 2006-001 | 3 Credit Hours
A history of music in America from approximately 1620 to the present. The course considers musical developments in America and the social, political and religious movements that have shaped American musical life. Examines musical genres, styles, personalities and trends. No prior musical experience required.
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WORLD MUSIC – ONLINE
FAM 2007-001 | Credits: 3
An overview of traditional music from many cultures and regions throughout the world, with emphasis on non-Western traditions. This course examines music as a cultural phenomenon influencing the lives and traditions of contemporary cultures and past civilizations. World Music focuses primarily on traditional and folk music, both in the culture’s region of origin and its diaspora.
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JAMMIN’ WITH LAPTOPS – ON CAMPUS (MWF 10:00am–12:40pm)
FAM 2014-001 | Credits: 3
Explore the potentials of laptop computers for music making! Various technical topics (including analog versus digital sound, audio software, effects, gear, MIDI and audio programming languages) will be surveyed. In addition, a survey of the history of computer music will be conducted through seminal readings and recordings. These will provide participants with the technical and analytical skills to utilize their laptops to creative ends in both individual and group projects.
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EXPERIMENTAL ROCK – ON CAMPUS (MWF 1:30–4:10pm)
FAM 2016-001 | Credits: 3
This course will provide a detailed overview of the tools, techniques and musical styles which impacted Rock Music in the 1960s and 70s, as well as many mainstream and non-mainstream musical trends of the last 30 years. It will focus on innovations such as multi-tracking tape machines (which allowed for sound on sound, tape-delay and flange) and provide a technical overview of electronic instruments such as the synthesizer. Musical trends including the 1950s avant-garde and Minimalism will serve as a bridge to examinations of seminal acts such as the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Kraftwerk, Can, Neu!, Brian Eno and Talking Heads among others.
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JAMMIN’ WITH LAPTOPS – ONLINE
FAM 2023-001 | Credits: 3

Play, record, and make music with online instruments! There are three units, each with a distinctive music-making session: Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2) and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3). In Unit 1, you will study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments and recording music you played through the exercises. In Units 2 and 3, you will form your own laptop band with online classmates to play and record music.
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JAPANESE POP, ANIME AND VIDEO GAME MUSIC – ONLINE
FAM 2050-002 | Credits: 3
Learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music (post 1980), including Anime theme songs, video game music and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, while also investigating the cultural differences between Japan and America.
_____

HISTORY OF ROCK ‘N ROLL I – ONLINE
FAM 3031-001 | Credits: 3
Rock and Roll had humble beginnings in the Southeastern United States, but over time it developed into a force that has defined youth culture on a global scale. This course provides a chronological survey that examines the relationship between the music, its most successful and colorful artists, the associated recording technology and the impact of the genre on American culture. Through critical listening and reading, students will be able to make historically informed and thoughtful decisions about the music they select and enjoy. Finally, the course will encourage students to seek and appreciate new styles (and perhaps inspire those who seek a career as a pop music artist). No prerequisite necessary.
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Session E: June 22 – August 6

MEDIA IN YOUR LIFE – ONLINE
EMED 1011-001 | Credits: 3

The typical American spends about 11 hours a day consuming media. Could it be, based upon time usage alone, that media consumption is the most important activity in our lives? The media industry plays an enormously important role in our lives and is foundational to the effective functioning of our democracy. Would you like to possess a more sophisticated understanding of media production and its artistic and theoretical underpinnings? Wouldn’t you like to know more about the latest digital production tools? If you answered “yes” to any one of these questions, then this course is for you.
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Session B: July 5 – August 6

MODERN DANCE BASICS – ONLINE
DNCE 1022-002 | Credits: 3
This one semester, repeatable course for non-dance majors introduces the techniques and movement vocabulary for contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while developing improvisational and performance skills. They will also develop the perspectives necessary to critically analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values. Through interactive online instruction, students use recording devices (smartphones, laptops, camcorders, etc.) to develop their dance technique and build a dance community.
_____

JAMMIN’ WITH LAPTOPS – ONLINE
FAM 2023-002 | Credits: 3

Play, record, and make music with online instruments! There are three units, each with a distinctive music making session: Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2) and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3). In Unit 1, you will study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments and recording music you played through the exercises. In Units 2 and 3, you will form your own laptop band with online classmates to play and record music.
_____

JAPANESE POP, ANIME AND VIDEO GAME MUSIC – ONLINE
FAM 2050-003 | Credits: 3
Learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music (post 1980), including Anime theme songs, video game music and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, while also investigating the cultural differences between Japan and America.
_____

HISTORY OF ROCK ‘N ROLL II – ONLINE
FAM 3032-001 | Credits: 3
Rock and Roll had humble beginnings in the Southeastern United States, but over time it developed into a force that has defined youth culture on a global scale. This course provides a chronological survey that examines the relationship between the music, its most successful and colorful artists, the associated recording technology and the impact of the genre on American culture. Through critical listening and reading, students will be able to make historically informed and thoughtful decisions about the music they select and enjoy. Finally, the course will encourage students to seek and appreciate new styles (and perhaps inspire those who seek a career as a pop music artist). No prerequisite necessary.
_____

Course Fees and Registration Info

Course fees for part-time students are $519 per credit hour for Ohio residents and $1158 per credit hour for non-residents. Costs include program fees.

UC students can register online at webapps2.uc.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.

Non-UC students can begin the registration process by visiting admissions.uc.edu/transfer/transfer_non-matric.

CCM News

CCM Drama and E-Media Announce New Film Collaboration

We are thrilled to announce that CCM’s Department of Drama and Division of Electronic Media have launched a new collaborative project, which will bring original scripted films to CCM’s performance season beginning next spring!

Utilizing the expertise and resources of both programs, students will receive hands-on experience in the development of a new film by serving as screenwriters, actors, directors, cinematographers and film editors, as well as location scouts, prop masters, costume designers and more.

“This exciting new film project will allow CCM students to collaborate across departments in the creation of a new and original film,” explains CCM’s A.B., Dolly, Ralph and Julia Cohen Chair of Dramatic Performance Richard Hess. “Our students have artistic voices and artistic visions that they need to practice articulating. What a fantastic opportunity.”

Scripts for this project’s inaugural film were solicited from students in January and February of 2015, with submissions coming from not only CCM Drama and E-Media students, but also from students in McMicken College and UC Clermont.

CCM Drama student Owen Alderson.

CCM Drama student Owen Alderson.

This year’s winning submission – entitled Binary – was written by sophomore drama major Owen Alderson.

A coming of age tale set in a private boarding school in Massachusetts, Binary is the story of a character named Emmett as he begins to transition to his true self, Julia.

Binary will be cast, rehearsed and filmed in the fall of 2015. The film will be edited in the spring of 2016 and will have a special showing in April of 2016 at UC’s MainStreet Cinema.

Stay tuned to The Village News for more information on Binary‘s production.

CCM News Student Salutes
CCM Drama major Bartley Booz in the E-Media short film 'Solitude.'

CCM’s Department of Drama and Division of Electronic Media Present 48-Hour Film Festival This February

This semester, CCM’s Department of Drama and Division of Electronic Media are providing a unique opportunity for aspiring filmmakers, performers and storytellers in the form of a 48-Hour Film Festival, which will run from Feb. 20 – 22.

Based on the innovative 48 Hour Film Project festival and competition, which launched in 2001, CCM’s 48-Hour Film Festival will challenge teams comprised of students from throughout the university to bring their short films from conception to completion within a brisk 48-hour window.

Within a single weekend, student teams will create and then screen their own short films.

As described by the original 48 Hour Film Project, this promises to be, “a wild and sleepless weekend in which you and your team have a blast making a movie. All writing, shooting, editing and scoring must be completed in just 48 hours. On Friday night you are assigned a prop, a line of dialogue and a theme that must be included in your movie. 48 hours later, you must submit your film. Next? Your masterpiece will be shared with the participants of the festival.”

All University of Cincinnati students are invited to apply to be assigned to a team for the inaugural CCM 48-Film Festival. Applicants will need to be available for the entire 48 hours from 7 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 20, through 7 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 22. Visit ccm.uc.edu/theatre/drama/48HourFilmFestival for application information. Applications must be submitted by 5 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015.

Applicants will be randomly assigned to teams and these assignments will be announced at a 7 p.m. meeting on Friday, Feb. 20. Teams will then be assigned a common prop, a common line of dialogue and a common theme, all of which must be included in each film. Film genres will not be assigned.

Teams will then have 48 hours to brainstorm, research, write, story-board, cast, film, score and edit a roughly five minute-long film, which will be screened in the MainStreet Cinema of UC’s Tangeman University Center on the night of Sunday, Feb. 22.

Teams will create job assignments, find costumes, scout locations, find props, create underscoring, rehearse, film and edit a final piece.

Learn more by visiting ccm.uc.edu/theatre/drama/48HourFilmFestival.

The inaugural CCM 48-Hour Film Festival is made possible thanks to the generous support from the Friends of CCM.

CCM News

CCM E-Media Hosts Free Public Screening of Student-Produced Short Film ‘Solitude’ on Dec. 9

'Solitude' poster design by Garrett Corcoran.

‘Solitude’ poster design by Garrett Corcoran.

CCM E-Media hosts a world-premiere of the student-produced short film Solitude at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 9, in the MainStreet Cinema of UC’s Tangeman University Center. Admission to this public screening is free and open to the general public.

Created by senior electronic media majors Matt Stalf, Cameron Coyan, Joey Meisberger and Alex Huddleson under the supervision of Assistant Professor of Electronic Media Lakshmi TirumalaSolitude is the story of Jack Khavo, a medical researcher who finds himself trapped by his daily routine. Jack had always believed that he would be able to make a difference with his job, but as his research comes to a standstill he begins to wonder if he will ever be able to make a meaningful contribution to his field. One night Jack encounters a strange dream, which shows him how to move forward. Unfortunately, the very thing that could advance his research could also endanger his life.

According to Coyan, he and his classmates divided up production roles to best fit everyone’s strengths. “Matt has a great eye for scene composition so he took over the role of director of photography and editor,” he explains. “Alex and Joey have a lot of experience with audio, so they took on the role of pre-production recording and sound design. I took on the role of director and writer as I’m the most familiar with the story.”

The four-person production team also recruited students from other departments and colleges to bring their vision to life. Solitude features the onscreen talents of CCM Drama students Bartley Booz, Connor Lawrence and Alice Skok, along with Adjunct Assistant Professor of Drama Robert Pavlovich. CCM E-Media student Tyler Peters contributed an original score and DAAP student Douglass Rouster created the animated title sequence for the film.

“Being able to grab from several different programs – including Electronic Media and the Drama Department at CCM along with Graphic Design in DAAP – is really great because we are getting experience working through multiple creative fields to turn out a collaborative piece,” Stalf explains.

For Professor Tirumala, Solitude is a perfect showcase of the immersive training that CCM E-Media students receive. “This film gives a great insight into the standards that our program expects from the students,” he says. “Having seen the rough cut, I can say that everyone involved in this project has done an exceptional job.”

CCM News CCM Video

CCM Celebrates German Composer Richard Wagner at 200 With Special Event Series

Film actor Richard Burton as composer Richard Wagner, from the 1983 Tony Palmer film 'Wagner.'

Film actor Richard Burton as composer Richard Wagner, from the 1983 Tony Palmer film ‘Wagner.’

CCM celebrates the 200th anniversary of composer Richard Wagner’s birth (May 22, 1813) with an unprecedented series of events this month. Beginning on Friday, Oct. 11, and running through Thursday, Oct. 24, CCM explores Wagner’s iconic work and enduring legacy with a series of guest lectures, film screenings and a concert performance by the CCM Philharmonia. Aside from the Oct. 12 Philharmonia performance, these events are free and open to the general public.

Richard Wagner was a 19th century German composer, theatre director, polemicist and conductor. He revolutionized opera through his concept of the Gesamtkunstwerk (“total work of art”), in which he combined the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts. His Gesamtkunstwerkalso greatly influenced many filmmakers, as detailed in the book Wagner and Cinema, co-edited by Jeongwon Joe, Associate Professor of Musicology at CCM, and Sander L. Gilman, Distinguished Professor of Germanic Studies at Emory University. According to Wagner and Cinema, early 20th century film critic W. Stephen Bush once declared, “Every man or woman in charge of the music of a moving picture theatre is, consciously or unconsciously, a disciple or follower of Richard Wagner.”

CCM’s bicentenary celebration opens at 2:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 11, with a guest lecture by Anthony Tommasini, Chief Classical Music Critic for the New York Times. Other highlights include the CCM Philharmonia’s Oct. 12 concert, “Wagner – Redemption Through Love,” which features selections from Wagner’s operas to be performed with the cinematic images from Tony Palmer’s biographical film about Wagner, starring Richard Burton. CCM will also welcome film director Tony Palmer to campus for a discussion on his films on Thursday, Oct. 24.

To celebrate this towering figure of German Romanticism and the indelible impression he made on the cinematic arts, CCM will also present a series of free film screenings exploring Wagner’s life and legacy.

Please see individual listings below for additional information on the festival’s public events.

CCM News

UC Hosts Global Lens Film Festival This Fall

CCM hosts 2013 Global Lens Film Festival ScreeningsThe University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music’s Division of Electronic Media (CCM E-Media) and the University of Cincinnati Libraries will host free public screenings of ten award-winning narrative feature films from Brazil, Chile, China, Egypt, India, Iran, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Mexico and Serbia this fall as part of the Global Film Initiative’s 2013 Global Lens film series.

All films will be shown at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays in the TUC MainStreet Cinema on the campus of the University of Cincinnati, except for the screening of Eduardo Nunes’ Southwest, which will be held at 6 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 2.

Launched in 2003, the Global Lens film series is designed to support the distribution of unique and critically acclaimed cinematic works from around the world. The 2013 series premiered at the Museum of Modern Art this past January and is now being presented in over 35 cities across the United States and Canada.

This year’s film series includes The Fantastic World of Juan Orol (El Fantástico Mundo De Juan Orol) on Sept. 4, Beijing Flickers (You-Zhong) on Sept. 18, Modest Reception (Paziraie Sadeh) on Oct. 2, The Parade (Parada) on Oct. 9, About 111 Girls (Darbare 111 Dokhtar) on Oct. 16, Life Kills Me (La Vida Me Mata) on Oct. 30, Cairo 678 on Nov. 6, Student on Nov. 13, Southwest (Sudoeste) on Dec. 2 and Shyamal Uncle Turns off the Lights on Dec. 4. Learn more about each film below.

CCM News

CCM E-Media Presents Free Screening of ‘Gold Rush Expedition Race’ Film on April 24

CCM E-Media will host a debut screening of the documentary film Gold Rush Expedition Race at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 24 in the MainStreet Cinema of UC’s Tangeman University Center. Admission is free and open to the general public.

The screening of this hour long film will be preceded by a brief introduction and followed by a question and answer session with the student producers, camera operators and film editors.

Educationally grounded, professionally driven and student produced, the Gold Rush Expedition Race documentary is a collaborative film produced by an interdisciplinary group of students at UC working under the guidance of a professional television and film producer/director. Sponsored by the UC Forward Collaborative, the project involved 33 students from four academic programs at three colleges at the University of Cincinnati:

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CCM Celebrates Film Music With Special Concert on Jan. 27!

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CCM presents a special treat for fans of film music this Sunday, as the acclaimed Philharmonia Orchestra and Jazz Ensemble go to the movies for the evening, celebrating the sounds of the cinema in UC’s Corbett Auditorium!

The Jan. 27 program will open with selections from classic film scores such as A Streetcar Named Desire before moving on to the work of singer/songwriter, arranger, film scorer and distinguished UC alumnus Randy Edelman (CCM ’69, HonDoc ’04)!

The Jan. 27 concert will also include Edelman’s symphonic piece Transcontinental: A Mad Musical Dash Across the USA, which was premiered by the Cincinnati Pops several years ago and which will be dedicated to the loving memory of Maestro Erich Kunzel.

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UC Hosts Global Lens Film Festival Jan. 14 – April 15

CCM E-Media presents the Global Film Initiative’s 2012 Global Lens film series.

CCM E-Media presents the Global Film Initiative’s 2012 Global Lens film series.

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music’s Division of Electronic Media (CCM E-Media) and the University of Cincinnati Libraries will host free public screenings of 10 award-winning narrative feature films from Albania, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Iran, Iraq, Morocco, Rwanda and Turkey this spring as part of the Global Film Initiative’s 2012 Global Lens film series.

All films will be shown at 2 p.m. on Mondays in the TUC MainStreet Cinema on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

CCM News

Discussing ‘The Damnation of Faust’s Visuals with CCM E-Media’s Raul Barcelona

CCM Assistant Professor of Electonic Media Raul Barcelona.

CCM Assistant Professor of Electonic Media Raul Barcelona.

This Saturday, CCM presents a unique multimedia production of Berlioz’s The Damnation of Faust. CCM E-Media faculty member Raul Barcelona recently discussed his work on the project with CCM Public Information Assistant and Arts Administration student Lillian Matchett.

Lillian Matchett: Could you give me a little background about your work at CCM?

Raul Barcelona: I’ve been here now for almost two years. My role here is Assistant Professor of Electronic Media, and I specifically teach new media and video production classes. My main focus is film making, but in the past I have also worked as a web designer and graphics designer, so I am also teaching some of those new media courses as well.

LM: Could you tell me a little about how you originally got involved with the production of The Damnation of Faust?

RB: Earl Rivers [CCM’s Director of Choral Studies and conductor] approached me to see if I would be interested in developing some visuals for the performance. He had this idea that it’s a work that is very cinematic in nature, even just by itself, and he thought that it would be a good opportunity to collaborate so that the music is accompanied with visuals.

LM: What was your original inspiration for the visuals we’ll see on Saturday?

CCM News Faculty Fanfare