People enjoyed performances during the University of Cincinnati CCM Moveable Feast. UC/Joseph Fuqua II

CCM Presents A Jazz Holiday Extravaganza on Sunday

An earlier version of this release incorrectly stated that CCM’s Jazz Holiday Extravaganza concert takes place on Saturday, Nov. 20. The concert is scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 20.

Swing into the season at this year’s Jazz Holiday Extravaganza at 4 p.m. Sunday, November 20 in Patricia Corbett Theater. The CCM Jazz Orchestra, led by Professor and Director of Jazz Studies Scott Belck, will perform alongside the CCM Jazz Lab Band, led by Assistant Professor Craig Bailey.

This year the CCM Jazz Lab Band brings you a host of holiday favorites, including arrangements of Jingle Bells, White Christmas, Greensleeves and I’ll be Home for Christmas. Tickets are available for purchase; UC students have free admission.

The CCM Jazz Orchestra celebrates the holiday season with the hot rhythms and cool sounds of Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Claude Thornhill and Stan Kenton.

Jazz up your holiday spirit at this annual, can’t-miss event!

Performance Time
4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20

Location
Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Tickets to CCM’s Jazz Holiday Extravaganza are $15 for general admission, $10 for non-UC students and free for UC students with valid university ID. Concert flex ticket packages are also available.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online at http://ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice.html.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

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The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation: Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor

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Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

CCM News Student Salutes

Fairytale Opera ‘Cendrillon’ Arrives on CCM’s Mainstage Nov. 17

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music presents a fairytale opera for the ages, Cendrillon (Cinderella), Nov. 17-20 in Corbett Auditorium as part of this year’s Mainstage Series. Director of Orchestral Studies, Mark Gibson, conducts with stage direction by Robin Guarino, the J. Ralph Corbett Distinguished Chair in Opera.

‘Cendrillon’ sketch by student costume designer, Maria Lenn.

‘Cendrillon’ sketch by student costume designer, Maria Lenn.

With original music by Jules Massenet and Libretto by Henri Caïn, Cendrillon is based on Charles Perrault’s original Cinderella story. However, Guarino weaves a bit more magic into CCM’s version of the classic fairytale — movie magic.

Inspired by Francois Truffaut’s 1973 French film Day for Night, CCM’s Cendrillon takes place on the set of a movie. Lucette, a script girl, is the opera’s “Cinderella” who falls asleep on set and dreams of becoming an actress. Her fairy godmother, in the guise of a costume designer, transforms Lucette into the star of the film and transports her to the ball where she falls in love with the Prince, an actor in the film. When Lucette awakes, she is surprised to find the film’s cast arguing about a mysterious woman who attracted the Prince at the ball.

CCM’s Cendrillon, including the added dream sequence, explores themes of transformation and surrealism. Under Guarino’s direction, the opera invites audiences to ask: if it was a dream, does that mean it wasn’t real?

Guarino particularly enjoys working on fairytale operas because of the potential she finds in their accessible storylines. “I love clear, simple, direct story-telling that connects to not only young people, but people of all ages,” she says.

A show for the whole family to enjoy, Cendrillon is ripe with all of the magic and romance of the original fairytale, complete with familiar characters such as the “ugly stepsisters” who appear as diva actresses in this retelling.

The opera is performed in four acts with a brief pause after Act I and an intermission between Acts II and III. It will be sung in French with English supertitles.

Creative Team
Mark Gibson, conductor
Yael Front, conductor on Sunday, Nov. 20*
Robin Guarino, stage director
Marie-France Lefebvre, musical preparation
Vince DeGeorge, choreographer
Thomas Umfrid, scenic designer
Maria Lenn, costume designer*
Nicki Berger, stage manager*
Erik McCandless, lighting designer*
Shannon Hutchins, wig & make-up designer*
*CCM student

Cast
Grace Newberry* as Lucette, the script girl
Jasmin White^ as Lucette, the script girl
Kayleigh Decker* as Actor playing the Prince
Amber Fasquelle^ as Actor playing the Prince
Alex Harper as The Director “Herald”/Ensemble
Murella Parton as Assistant Director/Ensemble
Michael Hyatt as The Camera Man/Ensemble
Christian Pursell* as Pandolfe, an actor (Lucette’s father)
John Tibbetts^ as Pandolfe, an actor (Lucette’s father)
Karis Tucker* as Madame de La Haltière, an actress (Pandolfe’s second wife)
Rebecca Printz^ as Madame de La Haltière, an actress (Pandolfe’s second wife)
Nicole Hodgins as Noémie, an actress (Madame de La Haltière’s daughter)
Chelsea Melamed as Dorothée, an actress (Madame de La Haltière’s daughter)
Erica Intilangelo* as The Costume Designer “Fairy”
Heidi Middendorf^ as The Costume Designer “Fairy”
Brianna Bragg, Shannon Cochran, Abigail Hoyt, Claire Lopatka, Lisa Rogali, Amy Joy
Stephans as Assistant Costume “Spirits”/Ensemble
Samson McCrady as Actor “The King”/Ensemble
Zane Hill as Actor “The Prime Minister”/Ensemble
Robert Stahley as Actor “The Dean”/Ensemble
Page Michels, Natalie Sheppard as Make-up Girls/Ensemble
Rebecca Castillo as Female Extra/Ensemble
Logan Wagner as Male Extra/Ensemble
Donghwi Baek as Lighting Crew/Ensemble

* Thursday, Nov. 17 and Sunday, Nov. 20
^ Saturday, Nov. 19

Performance Times
8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17
8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 19
2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Tickets to Cendrillon are $31-35 for general admission, $22-25 for non-UC students and $18-21 for UC students with a valid ID. Customizable subscription packages are also available.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online at ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Mainstage Season Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Opera Department Sponsor Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Rosenthal

Opera Production Sponsor: Genevieve Smith
____

Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

CCM News

CCM’s Studio Opera Series Presents ‘Bright Eyed Joy!’ Nov. 4-5

'Bright Eyed Joy!' composer Ricky Ian Gordon.

‘Bright Eyed Joy!’ composer Ricky Ian Gordon.

This release has been updated. Click here to read the current version.

CCM’s Studio Opera Series presents Bright-Eyed Joy!, a free cabaret of songs by Ricky Ian Gordon, which opens at 8 p.m. on Friday, November 4 and continues through Saturday, November 5 in the Cohen Family Studio Theater. Tickets to this free production become available on Monday. October 31 through the CCM Box Office.

As one of the county’s most popular and respected composers of art song, Ricky Ian Gordon is a living legend. Bright-Eyed Joy! features his recently composed songs as well as arias from Gordon’s two acclaimed operas, Grapes of Wrath and Morning Star.

The songs tell relatable stories of survival, inspiration and hope. Gordon has been actively collaborating with the CCM students in this production, and he personally hand-selected the program’s songs for each individual singer.

This will be the second instance in which CCM opera students have performed Gordon’s music. In December 2012, students had the rare opportunity to perform in a workshop of Gordon’s Morning Star, as part of the Opera Fusion: New Works initiative with the Cincinnati Opera. Morning Star later premiered at Cincinnati Opera in June 2015.

Oussama Zahr of Opera News praised Gordon for his diverse and “distinctive style — one that seems effortlessly to combine Broadway clarity, art-song melodies and jazzy flourishes with a sophisticated approach to harmony.”

Zahr wrote that Gordon’s Grapes of Wrath, based on John Steinbeck’s novel of the same name, “has many of the qualities you’d expect from an acclaimed opera in a tonal palette — abundant melody, shining orchestrations — but it is Gordon’s lyrical exuberance that stands out as uniquely his own.”

The audience can expect nothing less from Bright-Eyed Joy!, which opens at 8 p.m. on Friday, November 4 and continues through Saturday, November 5. Admission is free, but tickets are required. They often sell out quickly, so visit our guide to Studio Series tickets for tips and tricks to secure your seats.

CCM students will have an additional opportunity to work with Gordon later this month in the next installment of Opera Fusion: New Works. The 10-day workshop culminates in a free performance of excerpts from the composer’s newest opera, Intimate Apparel at 7:30 p.m. on November 14 at the Cincinnati Club, 30 Garfield Place, Cincinnati, OH 45202.

Program
Once I Was
Morning Star
Poor Girl’s Ruination/The Dream Keeper
Hallie Ann
Souvenir
Afternoon on a Hill
Otherwise
Resume/Wail/Frustration
To the Maid of Orleans
The Spring and the Fall
I Seen Snow
Being Small
Home of the Brave
Bound to Be
Kid in the Park
When Sue Wears Red
Joy
New Moon

Cast List
TJ Capobianco
Eric Heatley
Chandler Johnson
DeRon McDaniel
Briana Moynihan
Fotina Naumenko
Gabriella Sam
Paulina Villarreal

Accompanists
Maria Fuller
John Combs

Performance Times
8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 4
8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5

Location
Cohen Family Studio Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Admission is free. Reservations are required. Tickets become available at noon on Monday, Oct. 31. Please visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.
____
CCM Season Presenting Sponsor & Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Opera Department Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Rosenthal

Opera Production Sponsor: Genevieve Smith

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Story by CCM Graduate Student Charlotte Kies

CCM News
The Ariel Quartet. From left to right: Alexandra Kazovsky, Jan Grüning, Amit Even-Tov and Gershon Gerchikov.

Ariel Quartet Concert Series Continues Oct. 25 at CCM

After its stunning opening performance of the 2016-17 season in September, the Ariel Quartet returns to CCM in concert at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 25 in Corbett Auditorium with a program featuring the works of Mozart, Shostakovich and Dvořák. Tickets are available through the CCM Box Office.

The Ariel Quartet, string quartet-in-residence at CCM.

The Ariel Quartet, string quartet-in-residence at CCM. Photo by Saverio Truglia.

The Ariel Quartet is comprised of Alexandra Kazovsky, violin; Amit Even-Tov, cello; Gershon Gerchikov, violin; and Jan Grüning, viola. Grand Prize winners at the 2006 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition and 2014 recipients of the prestigious Cleveland Quartet Award, the Quartet was formed in Israel 16 years ago and now serves as CCM’s distinguished string quartet-in-residence.

Cincinnati Enquirer writer Janelle Gelfand said nearly every seat in CCM’s Corbett Auditorium was filled for the Quartet’s Sept. 6 opening concert and praised the “vibrant” performance.

“I loved the way these musicians traded phrases in Beethoven’s Quartet No. 1 in F Major, Op. 18, No. 1,” she wrote on Janelle’s Notes. “It was conversational, witty and vibrant. The Adagio was the picture of beautiful singing line and depth of feeling. The German word “himmlisch” (heavenly) came to mind.”

Join us at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25 in Corbett Auditorium as CCM’s string quartet-in-residence presents works from powerhouse composers Mozart, Shostakovich and Dvořák.

Repertoire
MOZART: String Quartet No. 14 in G Major, K. 387
SHOSTAKOVICH: String Quartet No. 3 in F Major, Op. 73
DVOŘÁK: String Quartet No. 12 in F Major, Op. 96 (“American Quartet”)

Performance Time
8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village,
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Tickets are $25 for general admission, $15 for non-UC students and FREE for UC students with valid ID.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online now through our e-Box Office! Visit ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice for CCM Box Office hours and location.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the campus of the University of Cincinnati. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____

The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation: Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor
____

Story by CCM Graduate Student Charlotte Kies

CCM News
Haoli Lin

Fanfare Magazine Critic Praises Violin Alum’s ‘Breathtaking’ New Album, ‘Romantic Journey’

Fanfare Magazine critic Robert Maxham heralds Romantic Journey, a new album from alumnus Haoli Lin (BM Violin Performance, 2013; MM Violin Performance, 2015), as both “breathtaking” and “urgently recommended.” Featuring music for violin and piano, Lin’s newest release was recorded in CCM’s own Robert J. Werner Recital Hall between October 2015 and March 2016.

Alumna and current Doctor of Musical Arts piano student Hai Jin (AD Piano Performance, 2013; MM Piano Performance, 2015) collaborates with Lin in Romantic Journey, which is available for purchase on Amazon.com.

“Haoli Lin’s repertoire presents the meat and potatoes of old-time violin recitals with refreshing naturalness and grace,” critic Maxham wrote in his review of the album for Fanfare Magazine.

Lin’s album showcases some of the finest gems of the classical romantic period. Opening with the effortlessly sweet melodies of Manuel Ponce and Jascha Heifetz’s Estrellita and concluding with the virtuosic Carmen Fantasy by Pablo Sarasate, Romantic Journey offers a taste of an entire generation of music in just 60 brief minutes.

When discussing the standard repertory for his instrument, Lin praises that of the romantic era as the most affective and emotionally persuasive. Lin invites listeners to “sit back and enjoy the journey” in a written introduction to the album posted on his website:

“It is often claimed that modern ears, even after decades of acclimation to increasingly modern and harmonically dissonant music, still find their home in the sounds of romanticism. The emotional and sentimental qualities of romantic music, combined with its inherent virtuosity and brilliance, create an undeniable beauty of expression that few can resist. The violin, with its enormous palette of sounds, was a preferred solo instrumental voice of many romantic composers due to its capability to convey character ranging from the sweetest of lyrical singing tone to full-throated aggressive power. It is my hope that this recording elicits in the listener the same wide range of emotions that these pieces have evoked in me since my childhood. Sit back and enjoy the journey.”

Lin performs on not one, but two historic violins of the Neapolitan family Gagliano on this recording. One, provided by the Guadagnini Violin Shop in Chicago, was made by Nicolò Gagliano and dates back to 1732. He also performs on another exquisite instrument, made by Januarius Gagliano in 1750, provided by University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music Collection.

About Haoli Lin
Born 1990 in Shantou, China, Lin became the youngest prizewinner in the history of China’s National violin competition at age 18. He also won first prize in Michigan’s Andrews International String competition in 2013. Lin has performed as a soloist, recitalist and chamber player throughout China and United States. His solo performances include concerto appearances with the China Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra, China Youth Symphony Orchestra, CCM Philharmonia Orchestra, Great Wall Soloists, Shenzhen Youth Symphony Orchestra, Andrews University Symphony Orchestra and the Shanxi Chamber orchestra. He has performed in prominent concert halls in China, including Beijing’s National Center for Performing Arts, Beijing Concert Hall, Hong Kong Sha Tin Music Hall, Tuen Wan Hall, Shenzhen Concert Hall and Shenzhen Poly Theatre.

Lin studied with Pei Feng, Pei-yan Liu and with the renowned Chinese violin pedagogue Yaoji Lin in the in Shenzhen Arts School. He has attended the Great Wall International Music Academy for four years, and he collaborated with renowned musicians such as Christopher O’Riley and Rohan De Silva. He has performed in master classes for Midori, Miriam Fried and the Tokyo Quartet. Lin earned his Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees as a Starling scholarship recipient at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music studying with Professor Kurt Sassmannshaus.

Lin was recently chosen as the recipient of a career Grant from the Rachel Elizabeth Barton Foundation. Lin concertizes on a Nicolò Gagliano violin from the year 1732, courtesy of the Guadagnini Violin shop in Chicago, and a Januarius Gagliano from the CCM collection.

About Hai Jin
Pianist Hai Jin graduated from the China Conservatory of Music in 2009, where she studied with Bing Han. She has received numerous awards and prizes in competitions, and has performed recitals and orchestral collaborations throughout China. She made her American debut at Boston University in 2010. As a collaborative pianist, Jin has served as faculty at the Great Wall Music Academy in Beijing and at the Cleveland International Music Festival. As a chamber musician, she has toured with the Sassmannshaus Piano Trio to critical acclaim in both the United States and Asia. She has studied with Lee Fiser and Sandra Rivers, and has worked with Rohan De Silva, Hiram Diaz, Erinn Frechette, Heather Verbeck Harrison and Gao Can. As a student of Awadagin Pratt, she earned an Artist Diploma and a Master of Music degree from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, where she is currently completing doctoral studies with James Tocco.

You can learn more about Haoli Lin and Romantic Journey by visiting http://www.haolilin.com.

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Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News
The U.S. Air Force Band and Singing Sergeants. Photo by The United States Air Force Concert Band.

CCM Alumni Return in Concert with the US Air Force Band on Oct. 21

Several UC College-Conservatory of Music alumni will return to campus and perform as part of a community relations concert tour with the U.S. Air Force Concert Band and Singing Sergeants at 8 p.m. Friday, October 21 in Corbett Auditorium.

The concert is free and open to the general public but ticket reservations are required. Tickets are available online at https://bit.ly/USAFBandTour or in person at UC’s Veterans Programs and Services Office.

This year marks the 75th anniversary of the U.S. Air Force Band, the premier musical organization of the U.S. Air Force, which includes the Concert Band, Singing Sergeants and four additional ensembles. For three consecutive years, the Concert Band and Singing Sergeants have been the featured performing ensemble of Macy’s nationally broadcast Fourth of July fireworks show in New York City.

The tour is part of the Air Force Band’s “Advancing Innovation Through Music” (AIM) educational outreach program; students will be invited to perform on stage during each concert of the tour. Band members will also host master classes and a panel discussion for CCM students.

CCM alumni in the USAFB. Photo provided by the U.S. Air Force Band.

CCM alumni in the USAFB. Photo provided by the U.S. Air Force Band.

Eight members of the Concert Band and Singing Sergeants are former CCM students who look forward to return to the stage of their alma mater — three other CCM alumni in the Air Force Band are not part of this tour.

“I am thrilled to be playing at CCM again after almost 17 years,” says Senior Master Sgt. Julianna Arnold (MM Clarinet Performance, 1999). “My experience there as a graduate student enriched my life in many ways and prepared me for a career in music in the Air Force.”

Also represented is an alumnus of CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement. Master Sgt. Adam Green attended the preparatory program between 1980-1985, which he credits for helping him to become a professional musician.

Technical Sgt. Kaitlin Taylor (BM Oboe Performance, 2010) remembers her years at CCM fondly. “I found myself surrounded by inspiring professors with high standards and student peers very committed to their studies,” she says. “The environment was, and is, constantly striving for creative excellence.”

Join us in welcoming the U.S. Air Force Concert Band and Singing Sergeants in concert at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21 in CCM’s Corbett Auditorium. Performance details and ticketing information are listed below.

*There is a University of Cincinnati Homecoming Kickoff Party on Sigma Sigma Commons from 6-9 p.m. on Oct. 21. Please be aware there may be heavier-than-normal traffic in and around campus.

About the U.S. Air Force Band (USAFB)
The U.S. Air Force Concert Band and Singing Sergeants are two of the six performing ensembles within the United States Air Force Band, the premier musical organization of the U.S. Air Force. Stationed at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Air Force Band honors those who have served, inspires American citizens to heightened patriotism and service and positively impacts the global community on behalf of the U.S. Air Force and the United States of America.

CCM Alumni in the USAFB:
Technical Sgt. Kaitlin Taylor (BM Oboe Performance, 2010)
Technical Sgt. Jilian McGreen (MM Vocal Performance, 2014 and DMA Vocal Performance ABD, anticipated 2017)
Technical Sgt. Benjamin M. Bowers (BM Clarinet Performance, 2003)
Technical Sgt. Val Lukashuk (BM Trumpet Performance, 1999)
Master Sgt. Christian Pagnard (MM Trumpet Performance, 1999)
Chief Master Sgt. Erica Ann Montgomery (MM Percussion Performance, 1990)
Master Sgt. Brooke Emery (MM Clarinet Performance, 2003)
Senior Master Sgt. Julianna Evans Arnold (MM Clarinet Performance, 1999)

Alumni in the USAFB not on tour:
Kathleen Leigh Fitzpatrick (French Horn, 1997-1998)
Technical Sgt. Jess Lightner (MM Tuba Performance, 2003)
Technical Sgt. Will Timmons (MM Trombone Performance, 2009)

Performance Time
8 p.m. Friday, October 21

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Admission is free and open to the general public but ticket reservations are required. Tickets are available online at https://bit.ly/USAFBandTour or in person at UC’s Veterans Programs and Services Office. Call 513-556-6811 for more information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.
For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____________________

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor & Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation
____________________

Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

Photography provided by the U.S. Air Force Band

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News
Classical guitarist Oscar Ghiglia Celebrates 42 years of residency at CCM on Oct. 9

Guitarist Oscar Ghiglia Celebrates 42 Years of Residency at CCM this Weekend

Guitar virtuoso Oscar Ghiglia.

Guitar virtuoso Oscar Ghiglia.

CCM’s Guest Artist Series welcomes legendary classical guitarist Oscar Ghiglia for a very special performance to celebrate his 42 years of residency at 4 p.m. this Sunday, Oct. 9 in the Robert J. Werner Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the general public.

Student guitarists at CCM have been the enthusiastic beneficiaries of Ghiglia’s concerts and master classes since 1974. He is a major and, perhaps, most persuasive champion of Andrés Segovia-inspired European guitar playing.

About Oscar Ghiglia
Oscar Ghiglia was born in Livorno, Italy, to a pianist mother and a painter father. While attending Rome’s Santa Cecilia Conservatory, he participated in guitarist Andrés Segovia’s summer master classes in Siena and Santiago de Compostela. Following his graduation in 1962, he performed in several internationally recognized competitions, earning the following awards: first prize in the Orense Guitar Competition, first prize in the Santiago de Compostela Guitar Competition and first prize in the Radio France International Guitar Competition.

In 1964, Andrés Segovia invited Ghiglia to be his assistant in master classes in California. Since then, Ghiglia has given concerts and master classes throughout the world. In addition to appearing extensively in all parts of North and South America and Europe, he is a frequent performer in East Asia, Israel, Argentina, New Zealand and the South Pacific, and has recorded for Angel, Nonesuch and Stradivarius Records. While enjoying an active performing career, Ghiglia has always favored teaching as a sister-profession. Through masterclasses and private lessons, Ghiglia has taught almost every well-known guitarist today.

Ghiglia is currently professor emeritus of guitar at the Basel Music-Akademie and gives summer courses in Europe, America and the Middle East. He established the classical guitar summer program at Aspen, Colorado, and taught there for twenty years. He now regularly gives summer classes at the Festival d’Arc in southern France, at the Chigi Academy in Siena, Italy and at the Festival Gargnano, Italy. The Hartt School of Music awarded him an honorary doctorate in 2004 for his outstanding contributions to classical guitar teaching and performance. In 2009, the Guitar Foundation of America presented him with their prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award.

Performance Time
4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9

Location
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Admission is free and open to the general public. Reservations are not required.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

The Sarah Marvin Foundation for the Performing Arts
____

Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

CCM News
The Cohen Family Studio Theater at CCM.

Professor Aik Khai Pung Gives Inside Look into Polish Festival Experience

With more than 700 audience members in attendance, the Sept. 9 opening concert of CCM’s Polish Festival was a great success! Far from being over, the Polish Festival events continue on Tuesday, Sept. 13 at 8 p.m. with a performance by CCM’s preeminent modern music ensemble, Cafè MoMus, in Cohen Family Studio Theater.

Led by CCM Assistant Professor of Music Aik Khai Pung, the Cafè MoMus concert features an evening of exciting new sounds, including a world premiere by Artur Słotwiński and a grand finale performance of the first movement of Krzysztof Penderecki’s Sextet (2000). Audience members can meet with Słotwiński and Café MoMus after the performance for coffee and conversation.

Also as part of the Polish Festival, Professor Pung will direct the CCM Concert Orchestra in a performance of Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1 and Górecki’s breathtaking Symphony of Sad Songs on Saturday, September 17 at 8 p.m. in Corbett Auditorium.

CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies had the pleasure of speaking with Professor Pung about his experience participating in the Polish Festival so far.

Why is it important that CCM produce a festival of concerts and lectures devoted to Polish music?
Most of our students spend about two to four years at CCM. All teachers will try to squeeze in as much materials to the students as possible during this short amount of time. These materials are important of course, but not necessarily connected. When we learn a piece of music, it is crucial that we know the background and be able to connect it with visual arts, cultures and related artists, etc. By producing such a festival, the students get an opportunity to learn about a specific topic in depth.

Hopefully this will influence and inspire them to discover more about the music they will play in the future, rather than merely playing all the right notes and rhythms. For this Polish festival, we have living scholars, artists, soloists and composers all gathered here at CCM to help our students understand more about Polish music, which is extremely valuable.

How did you pick the repertoire for the Concert Orchestra’s Sept. 17 performance? What can you tell me about your decision to pair Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1 with Górecki’s Symphony No. 3?
For the piano concerto, it is an opportunity for a piano student to play with a real orchestra. This year we have eight participants who competed to be featured in the concert. Piano students practice in a tiny room most of the time and rarely have a chance to play with an orchestra so it is important for us to create these types of opportunities. Górecki’s Symphony No. 3 is gorgeous and very much appropriate for training a young orchestra, especially the string section. The work requires over 50 minutes of playing with a very disciplined bow. We all know that playing slow bow exercises is essential, but how many of us really practice that daily? By programming Górecki’s Symphony, we kind of force the young string players to play beautifully and with a well-controlled bow.

In addition to directing the CCM Concert Orchestra, you also direct Café MoMus, CCM’s modern music ensemble. What can you tell me about the unique experience that MoMus will bring to this festival?
Exploring new sound is fun and exciting. I enjoy working with living composers and exploring the world of sound with them. For this festival, Café MoMus is presenting three Polish composers from different generations and backgrounds. Although all three of them were born in Poland, Krzysztof Penderecki became the professor at Yale School of Music around the mid-1970s and Bettina Skrzypczhak spent a lot of time in Switzerland and some time in Germany. Artur Słotwiński has remained in Poland for most of his life. They received different influences of cultures, which affects their compositional styles.

Instead of programming all works of well-known composers, the goal of Café MoMus is to discover young talents as well. I find Artur Słotwiński’s works energetic, well-crafted and effective. The student musicians have enjoyed playing it, but of course there are some tricky passages. Słotwiński will be here to coach us himself for the world premiere of his Piano Quintet. Bettina Skrzypczhak’s Mirrors is one of the most difficult pieces I have ever conducted — not only the complexity of construction, but also the philosophical idea behind each poem. I would say the music matches the texts and poems 100%, as if you could see the words in the music. Penderecki of course is very well-known and the Sextet is one of his few chamber works. Some scholars consider this to be one of his finest works. This is a very unique pairing and I hope it will create some sort of chemistry.

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The Polish Festival runs Sept. 9-Oct. 2 throughout the CCM Village. You can learn more about the festival’s future events below or by visiting ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/concerts/orchestras/polishfest.

8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13
• Orchestra Series •
PENDERECKI, SKRZYPCZAK AND SLOTWINSKI
Café MoMus
Aik Khai Pung, music director
As part of the Polish Festival, Café MoMus will present works of Polish composers from three different generations: Krzysztof Penderecki, Bettina Skrzypczak and Artur Słotwiński. Join us for coffee and conversation with Artur Słotwiński and the musicians after the performance.
Location: Cohen Family Studio Theater
Admission: FREE
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8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17
• Orchestra Series •
CHOPIN AND GÓRECKI
CCM Concert Orchestra
Aik Khai Pung, music director and conductor
CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 1
Featuring the winner of the CCM Piano Competition
GÓRECKI: Symphony No. 3 (“Symphony of Sad Songs”)
Featuring the winner of the CCM Voice Competition
Location: Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: $15 general, $10 non-UC students, UC students FREE.
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7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18
• Jazz Series •
THE MUSIC OF VIRTUOSO JAZZ PIANIST AND COMPOSER WLODEK PAWLIK
CCM Jazz Orchestra and Faculty Jazztet
Featuring guest artist Wlodek Pawlik, piano
Scott Belck, conductor
Join us as we celebrate the stunning music and musicians of Poland and feature Grammy Award-winning pianist and composer Wlodek Pawlik as he performs his original compositions and arrangements.
Location: Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: $15 general, $10 non-UC students, UC students FREE.
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4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2
• Orchestra & Choral Series •
POLISH FESTIVAL CLOSING CONCERT
CCM Philharmonia, CCM Chamber Choir and Xavier University Concert Choir
Featuring faculty artist Daniel Weeks, tenor
Mark Gibson, music director and conductor
MONIUSZKO: Overture to Halka
PENDERECKI: Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima
SKROWACZEWSKI: English Horn Concerto
SZYMANOWSKI: Symphony No. 3 in B-flat Major, Op. 27 (“Song of the Night”)
Featuring Daniel Weeks, soloist
Location: Corbett Auditorium
Tickets: $15 general, $10 non-UC students, UC students FREE.

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Mark Gibson conducts the CCM Philharmonia at Moveable Feast.

Discussing CCM’s Polish Festival with Professor Mark Gibson

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music is proud to present an interdisciplinary collection of concerts in the month-long Polish Festival running Sept. 9 through Oct. 2.

200px-herb_polski-svg

The coat of arms of Poland.

Through a series of classical and jazz concerts, lectures and a special art installation, CCM’s Polish Festival celebrates the wealth of extraordinary music and creative expression of one of the world’s great cultures.

The festival’s opening concert begins at 8 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 9, with a performance by the CCM Philharmonia in Corbett Auditorium. CCM Director of Orchestral Studies Mark Gibson will lead the Philharmonia in a concert featuring the world premiere of American Dreams by alumnus Piotr Szewczyk (BM Violin, 2000; MM Violin and Composition, 2003). The program will also include Witold Lutosławski’s Concerto for Orchestra. Naumburg Gold Medalist and CCM faculty artist Soyeon Kate Lee will join the Philharmonia for a performance of Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 2.

Follow this link to the Polish Festival Schedule to view all of the events: http://ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/concerts/orchestras/polishfest.

CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies sat down with Polish Festival Artistic Director Mark Gibson to learn more about the creation and inspiration behind the event.

What originally inspired you to create the Polish Festival?
The initial inspiration came through discussion with Polish friends on the wealth of extraordinary music from Poland, especially in the last century. I jokingly suggested that the only reason we don’t perform more of it is because the names are unfamiliar and daunting. After overcoming that minor stumbling block, the music on the other side – masterworks by Lutosławski, Szymanowski, Skrowaczewski, Penderecki and more – immediately rose to the level of challenge and quest.

What do you hope students will learn from participating in the Polish Festival concerts?
They are learning that there is so much beyond Chopin, even as we enjoy the rare opportunity to share both Chopin piano concertos with our students and public. Specifically, the Lutosławski Concerto for Orchestra takes its place next to, not beneath, its namesake by Bartók. The Szymanowski “Song of the Night” is nothing less than the most colorful Polish Impressionism, inspired by Ravel but uniquely crafted and painted in sound. And Penderecki’s magnum opus, “Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima,” remains one of the most dramatic, powerful evocations of the horrors of war ever committed to paper.

Every score we have programmed, from the legendary opera composer Stanisław Moniuszko to the Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and composer Włodek Pawlik, bears the mark of mastery and import. They all demand to be heard and experienced.

Besides the fact that the composers of the festival are Polish, how did you program all of the music? Could you tell me what led you to pair Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 2 with Lutosławski’s Concerto for Orchestra for your opening concert?
The opening concert of the CCM Philharmonia season has more than once featured a faculty guest artist as a soloist. I had been looking for a chance to work with Soyeon Kate Lee, former Naumburg Competition winner, ever since her arrival at CCM several years ago. The Chopin was the ideal opportunity; when I asked which of the two concertos she preferred to play, she offered the F Minor. The Lutosławski leapt out as among the most celebratory, virtuosic scores I have never conducted, though I have admired it for decades. We perform Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra in November, so the Lutosławski was therefore an easy choice to open the season. The Philharmonia is eating it up!

As for the remainder of the programming, I had the difficult task of choosing between literally dozens of worthy composers and styles. A work such as Górecki’s gorgeous and moving “Symphony of Sad Songs” is by now part of the canon. Along with the Penderecki Threnody, a broad spectrum of Polish music will be performed. Skrowaczewski’s English Horn Concerto was selected to provide a venue to feature another of our superb students. The Szymanowski Third Symphony, the “Song of the Night,” has been on my wish list for at least 20 years. It will be an honor to share it not only with our students and public, but with the Xavier University Choir and tenor soloist CCM faculty artist Daniel Weeks as collaborators on this performance. Ultimately, there were too many scores to choose from and unfortunately we can’t devote an entire year to Polish music. I hope our public might be inspired to explore further by what they hear.

Did you have a strong relationship with the Cincinnati Polish community before planning this festival?
My primary contact with the Polish community in Cincinnati has been through my jazz colleague, Rick VanMatre, who is married to the brilliant Polish visual artist, Anna Socha VanMatre. In fact, she has donated a major art work, a dramatic piece from her “Metamorphosis” series, for display in Corbett Auditorium for the Festival concerts. Through my friendship with the VanMatre’s, I have been introduced to more members of the local community, notably the scientist Piotr Chomczynski and his wife, Dr. Judith Heiny, whose generous sponsorship makes this festival possible. It has been gratifying to see the support from the local community, in particular the Polish-American Society of Greater Cincinnati, led by Emilia Bacca.

Music making is about community after all, the creation of family through sound. Our family just became significantly bigger.

Is the Polish Festival a one-time event, or do you hope to make it into a recurring celebration of Polish music?
For the past 10 years, we have started our orchestral season with a festival dedicated either to a specific composer or a national style. I felt it was time that Polish music be celebrated in a similar fashion, and though I cannot anticipate another festival dedicated to Polish music, I know that we will continue to feature it in our programming. Next year, we are committing major resources to celebrate the centenary of Leonard Bernstein, one of my conducting teachers and a major influence on the lives of so many American musicians.

Do you have any other thoughts you’d like to share?
I promise those who come to our concerts will be delighted with and inspired by the music of Poland, and they will absolutely learn how to pronounce the names of the composers by the end! I encourage one and all to join us for this unique tribute to one of the world’s great musical traditions.

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The Polish Festival runs Sept. 9-Oct. 2 throughout the CCM Village. You can learn more about the festival’s opening concert and other events here.

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CCM Music Education students perform in the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris during a study abroad trip.

Summer Memories: Music Education Students Study Abroad in Europe

As part of the first music education study abroad trip, a group of 20 adventurous CCM students traveled to Europe to study in the countries where Western art music was born last summer.

Associate Professor of Music Education Eva Floyd hopes to organize a second study abroad trip in spring 2018. The first trip led the students to Budapest, Vienna, Salzburg and Paris on the 12-day adventure to deepen their appreciation and understanding of music. Students participated in master classes, performed in historic venues, attended concerts and visited cities in which some of classical music’s greatest composers lived and worked.

“When you see the places where Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven were born, lived or worked, it makes the music seem more human,” Floyd said, adding that half of the students had previously never travelled internationally.

Supported by grants from UC International and the Tangeman Sacred Music Center, this was the first study abroad trip for a CCM music education class, according to Floyd.

Traveling to the cities in which these great composers created masterpieces gave new life to their art and added personal dimension to music beyond what can be taught in a classroom.

Similar to learning a foreign language, music literacy is strengthened through studies as well as experience. The act of engaging with a culture first hand is a crucial step towards fluency. Likewise, studying and experiencing music in the countries of its origin encourages a broader understanding of music and music education.

Program participant Taylor Limbert, a junior in vocal music education, reflected on his experience with the program:

“Actually talking with and learning from and performing for people from other cultures was so enriching and I’m so glad I had that opportunity. I had been to Europe before last summer’s trip but this trip was by far the most important in my personal journey as an educator and a person.”

Students in front of Esterhazy Palace in Austria, home one of Haydn’s most important patrons.

Students in front of Esterhazy Palace in Austria, home one of Haydn’s most important patrons.

Students observed music classes of a variety of grades and levels and participated in workshops at the Kodaly Institute in Hungary and the Orff Institute in Salzburg. They had previously studied the famous “Kodaly approach” to music education“seeing it in person made them realize the full potential of music education,” Floyd said.

As part of the program students were able to walk in the figurative footsteps of classical giants. They visited Esterhazy Palace in Eisenstadt, Austria — home to one of Haydn’s most important patrons. Students also toured Liszt’s and Kodaly’s residences in Budapest, Beethoven’s and Haydn’s residences in Vienna and Mozart’s birth home and family residence in Salzburg. Participants also heard concerts while traveling through these historic cities, including the famous Vienna Boys Choir.

Not only did the students visit cultural landmarks, they also had the opportunity to perform in some of the most historically significant and recognizable venues such as the Kodaly Institute in Hungary, St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, Mondsee Cathedral outside Salzburg and Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

“It is a privilege to see and walk through historic cathedrals,” Floyd said. “To make music in such a space allows you to take a piece of it home in your heart.”

Floyd prepared the group’s choral repertoire and organized a choral conducting master class with Peter Erdei, professor at the Liszt Academy and Kodaly Institute, for both CCM and Kodaly Institute students.

“The interchange between students from all corners of the globe was very exciting and proved to be a rich experience for all,” said Floyd, who studied in Hungary for two years before joining CCM faculty.

“The experience is so much more than just learning content and traveling. It helps you learn about yourself. It is very beneficial to get out of your comfort zone, and to be an outsider with language and culture. This helps you empathize with others and find confidence within yourself.”

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Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

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