‘Waco’ TV Series Editor Elliot Greenberg Shares Career Insights with CCM Students

Hollywood feature film editor and CCM Electronic Media alumnus Elliot Greenberg (BFA 2001) returns to CCM this week to talk to current students about his own journey in the film and television business. His master class will take place at 12:30 p.m. this Friday, Feb. 23, 2018 in CCM’s Mary Emery Hall Room 3250.

Elliot Greenberg.

Greenberg recently finished work on the six-part TV miniseries Waco for the Paramount Network. The series is based on the 1993 Waco, Texas siege and marks Greenberg’s first time editing for television.

The process of cutting a six-hour miniseries brought many new challenges to the seasoned feature film editor — who has previously worked with Waco creators John Erick and Drew Dowdle on such movies as The Poughkeepsie Tapes, Quarantine, Devil, As Above, So Below and No Escape.

“Besides the technical challenges, the subject matter was the real challenge,” Greenberg says of Waco. “Telling the true story of this tragedy weighed heavy on me each and every day. To help bring it to life as part of an amazing team of filmmakers, actors and craftspeople has been a true honor and one I am very proud of.”

Greenberg visits CCM to give current students a look into what the film and TV business is like from the perspective of post-production editing work. He will talk to students about his own career, from breaking into the film industry and rising through the ranks to becoming the lead picture editor on feature films and TV shows.

“I hope that through my own journey, students will gain a better understanding of what it is like to work in Hollywood,” Greenberg says. “From someone who has been exactly where they are now, I hope to show them that getting to work at such a high level in the film/TV business is not as impossible as it might seem, and with a lot of hard work and determination they can achieve their careers goals no matter what the field.”

After graduating from CCM, Greenberg moved across the country to Los Angeles and started his career as a post-production assistant, training under director Wes Craven’s longtime editor Patrick Lussier on the films Cursed and Red Eye. He then moved on to work at View Askew Productions as the first assistant editor on Clerks II. His credits also include ChronicleEscape Plan, Fantastic Four and To The Bone, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2017.

Greenberg remembers his time at CCM fondly. As a student, he won the Paramount Studio internship as part of E-Media’s annual Frederick W. Ziv Awards in 2001. He was also part of a group who produced a short film called Eastern Standard Time, which won a student Emmy Award.

“The award wasn’t what I remember most,” Greenberg says. “It was the late night after-hour editing sessions with E-Media Professor Kevin Burke that stuck with me. His mentorship is what gave us the belief we could pull this project off, and proved to me one of the cornerstones of my career — that we don’t work alone. Collaboration is what this business is all about. I am forever grateful to not only Professor Burke for this, but for all of my teachers at E-Media.”

You can see Greenberg’s most recent work in Waco. Episode four of the six-part series airs at 10 p.m. this Wednesday, Feb. 21 on the Paramount Network.

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Richard Goode

Acclaimed Pianist Richard Goode visits CCM for Master Classes

CCM welcomed world-renowned pianist Richard Goode for a series of master classes with students on April 13 and 15 in the Robert J. Werner Recital Hall. Goode worked extensively with a total of six students over his two-day residency, helping with everything from technique to overall musicianship. This was a wonderful opportunity for CCM’s young musicians to study with one of the world’s foremost performers for the classical piano.

Goode, hailed as a pianist of “staggering virtuosity” by The New York Times, also joined our friends at the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO) this weekend to play Mozart’s final piano concerto, No. 27. The concert, from the CSO’s Masterworks Series, also featured Anton Bruckner’s Symphony No. 3.

About Richard Goode

Richard Goode has been hailed for music-making of tremendous emotional power, depth and expressiveness, and has been acknowledged worldwide as one of today’s leading interpreters of Classical and Romantic music. He has won a large and devoted following after regular performances with the major orchestras, recitals in the world’s music capitals, and through his extensive and acclaimed Nonesuch recordings. Gramophone magazine recently captured the essence of what makes Goode such an original and compelling artist:

“Every time we hear him, he impresses us as better than we remembered, surprising us, surpassing our expectations and communicating perceptions that stay in the mind.”

An exclusive Nonesuch recording artist, Goode has made more than 24 recordings over the years, ranging from solo and chamber works to lieder and concertos. His latest recording of the five Beethoven concertos with the Budapest Festival Orchestra and Iván Fischer was released in 2009 to exceptional critical acclaim, described as “a landmark recording” by the Financial Times and nominated for a Grammy award. His 10-CD set of the complete Beethoven sonatas cycle, the first-ever by an American-born pianist, was nominated for a Grammy and was ranked among the most distinguished recordings of his repertoire. Other recording highlights include a series of Bach Partitas, a duo recording with Dawn Upshaw, and Mozart piano concertos with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra.

A native of New York, Richard Goode studied with Elvira Szigeti and Claude Frank, with Nadia Reisenberg at the Mannes College of Music, and with Rudolf Serkin at the Curtis Institute. His numerous prizes over the years include the Young Concert Artists Award, First Prize in the Clara Haskil Competition, the Avery Fisher Prize, and a Grammy award for his recording of the Brahms Sonatas with clarinetist Richard Stoltzman. His first public performances of the complete cycle of Beethoven sonatas at Kansas City’s Folly Theater and New York’s 92Y in 1987-88 brought him to international attention being hailed by the New York Times as “among the season’s most important and memorable events.” It was later performed with great success at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall in 1994 and 1995.

Mr. Goode served, together with Mitsuko Uchida, as co-Artistic Director of the Marlboro Music School and Festival in Marlboro, Vermont from 1999 through 2013. Participating initially at the age of 14, at what the New Yorker magazine recently described as “the classical world’s most coveted retreat,” he has made a notable contribution to this unique community over the 28 summers he has spent there. He is married to the violinist Marcia Weinfeld. When the couple is not on tour, they and their collection of some 5,000 volumes live in New York City.

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Story by CCM and UC Lindner College of Business graduate student Ryan Strand (BFA Musical Theatre, 2006)

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