CCM Acting Seniors Take Over Arnold’s Bar for a Shakespearean Treat

CCM Acting Class of 2017.

CCM Acting Class of 2017.

Cincinnati’s oldest tavern will offer more than just food and beverages this weekend. Eleven senior CCM Acting students will take over part of Arnold’s Bar and Grill, located at 210 East Eighth St., to present Shakespeare On The Rocks: A Midsummer Night’s Dream at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 25.

The production is part of a class project under CCM associate professor D’Arcy Smith — but Smith isn’t directing the show. In fact, Shakespeare On The Rocks: A Midsummer Night’s Dream has no director and the students only rehearse the show once before the free, one-night-only performance.

This new approach to Shakespeare is based on the Back Room Shakespeare project, a Chicago-based initiative created by actor Samuel Taylor. Thanks to CCMpower, the students were able to receive guidance from Taylor, whose vision is to bring Shakespeare to the masses, without all of the frills and formality that usually accompany the Bard’s works.

“We’re not trying to re-create Elizabethan London,” according to the Back Room Shakespeare project’s website. “We’re trying make a space where Shakespeare’s beautiful, bawdy and bloody plays feel at home. Where actors can be responsible for their own creative work. We’re looking for a party. A riot! A hoot! We try to turn people on, and turn nothing off — not even the cellphone. It’s storytime, not judgement day.”

Shakespeare On The Rocks: A Midsummer Night’s Dream is the first Back Room Shakespeare Project production in Cincinnati. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., and the show kicks off at 7 p.m. After the performance, the actors will accept donations for CCMpower. Visit the Facebook event for more details.
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Performance Time
7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25

Location
Arnold’s Bar and Grill, 210 East Eighth St.
Cincinnati, OH 45202

Admission
Admission is free, reservations are not required.

 

Student Salutes

CCM Slideshows: ‘Her Naked Skin’

Let CCM’s Mainstage production of political drama Her Naked Skin take you back in time to London in 1913, when women fought the establishment for the right to vote. Directed by CCM Acting Chair Richard E. Hess, Her Naked Skin plays Feb. 9-12 at Patricia Corbett Theater. Tickets are available through the CCM Box Office.

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Rebecca Lenkiewicz’s Her Naked Skin explores a crucial moment in the Suffragette Movement when thousands of women were sent to Holloway Prison after demanding equal rights. Political battles collide with personal struggles when Celia Cain, trapped by the policies of the day and a frustrating marriage, begins an affair with seamstress Eve Douglass while they are imprisoned.

This production contains adult themes and situations, including brief nudity, and is intended for mature audiences.

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9
  • 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10
  • 2 & 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12

Location
Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets

Tickets to Her Naked Skin are $27-31 adults, $17-20 non-UC students and $15-18 UC students with a valid ID. Tickets to the Feb. 8 preview performance are just $15.

Student rush tickets will be sold one hour before each performance to non-UC students for $12-15, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid ID, also based on availability.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online at ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/mainstage/her-naked-skin.

Parking and Directions

Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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Season Presenting Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Mainstage Season Production Sponsor: Macy’s

CCM News CCM Slideshows
'Her Naked Skin' Wigs

CCM Behind-the-Scenes: Creating Wigs & Make-Up for ‘Her Naked Skin’

Danae R. Jimenez, third-year graduate student at CCM, always dreamed of doing hair and make-up for theatre. When she was a little girl, she remembers telling her grandma, “I’m gonna do hair and make-up for the stars!”

Now, at least during CCM’s production of Her Naked Skin, Jimenez is turning her focus to suffragettes.

Danae Jimenez with two wigs from CCM's production of 'Her Naked Skin.'

Danae Jimenez with two wigs from CCM’s production of ‘Her Naked Skin.’

Jimenez is the Wig and Make-Up Designer for Her Naked Skin, a political drama about women who fought for the right to vote in London in 1913. Directed by CCM Acting Chair Richard E. Hess, the play runs Feb. 8 (preview) through Feb. 12 in Patricia Corbett Theater.

There are 24 wigs in the production and 5 different facial hair pieces, Jimenez says. It is a big production for CCM’s five-person Wig and Make-up Shop, but the students are no strangers to hard work.

CCM has one of the only graduate-level Wig and Make-Up programs in the country, which is why Jimenez choose to study at the college after she graduated with an undergraduate degree in theatre from Saint Mary’s College in Indiana.

“Im from Ohio and CCM has always been one of those places with prestige attached to it,” she says. “My professors at Saint Mary’s said this was the place I needed to be.”

Since she became at student at CCM, Jimenez has designed wigs and make-up for several shows, including Mainstage productions of A Chorus Line and Pentecost. She began designing for Her Naked Skin in the fall and the students started building the hair pieces when everyone returned from winter break.

“This show is very different for me design-wise because we had to do so much pre-planning,” she says. “I think one of the largest challenges was to not over design. We wanted to make sure that our choices were made smartly.”

She looked at historical photos to shape her designs around how people actually wore their hair in the early 1900s. She even found photos of the real suffragettes who were sent to Holloway Prison, a setting depicted in Her Naked Skin.

“Being able to look at real photos of women from that time in those situations was very cool,” says Jimenez, who minored in women’s studies when she was an undergraduate student. “Finding actual true historical research was probably the best and easiest part of the design process.”

The hard part was planning around the multiple wig and make-up changes that occur throughout the production. Most of the actors in Her Naked Skin play multiple roles, so the wig and make-up changes often signify character changes. Jimenez was challenged to create practical designs that can be quickly fixed and altered behind-the-scenes during the performance.

Some of the lead female characters have two wigs. The backup wigs are used during certain “action scenes” so the primary wigs can remain styled correctly. For example, Jimenez designed a second wig for a character who is forcibly hosed with water when she is jailed in Holloway prison.

Danae Jimenez with CCM acting student Spencer Lackey.

Danae Jimenez with CCM acting student Spencer Lackey.

She kept the make-up fairly simple to give the women a natural look because make-up was not widely used until the 1920s. However, the men wear more make-up and have more wigs and hair pieces to represent their character changes.

“Some of the men get fun character make-up because they are playing specific historical characters so we are adjusting that make-up to make them look more like the real people,” Jimenez says.

“My favorite one right now is Spencer Lackey, who is playing Keir Hardie [a former leader of the United Kingdom’s Labour Party]. We are doing a beard for him and we are going to do his make-up to make him look aged.”

The students also built a curly white “judge” wig from scratch for CCM actor Landon Hawkins, who plays the Speaker of the House in Her Naked Skin. Jimenez is working with Assistant Professor of Make-Up Kelly Yurko on the complicated wig. She has never built such a wig before but she previously created a fully hand-tied wig for  class that took her between 50 and 60 hours to complete — from laying the wig’s lace foundation and sewing it together to tying all of the hair into place.

The wig and make-up crew did not build all of the wigs from scratch, most were built by previous students for past CCM productions. However, Jimenez styled all of the wigs. They also had to be altered to fit the actors; the students traced the actors heads to create new measurements for the wigs.

Danae Jimenez with fellow wig and make-up student Meredith Keister as she "wefts," or creates tracks of hair, for a wig.

Danae Jimenez with fellow wig and make-up student Meredith Keister as she “wefts,” or creates tracks of hair, for a wig.

Many of the wigs needed to be “refronted,” which means the students replaced part of the wigs to blend with the actors’ natural hairlines. This process involves tying hair piece-by-piece into a lace foundation from the middle of the crown to the hairline. This can take about 10 to 12 hours.

“Everyone has been so helpful,” Jimenez says about the other students working with her. “For there only being five of us in the shop, everyone has been great.”

Audiences can see the products of their handy work when CCM presents Her Naked Skin from Feb. 8-12 in Patricia Corbett Theater. Tickets are available online through CCM’s Box Office.

After Her Naked Skin closes the shop will focus on CCM’s next Mainstage production, Jerry Herman’s powerful musical Mack and Mabel. Jimenez has been assisting Yurko in creating wig and make-up designs for the musical, which is set in the 1920s.

“I know it’s going to be a lot of wigs and a lot of changes, Jimenez says. “It’s going to be another big one.”

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Event Information
Her Naked Skin contains adult themes and situations, including brief nudity, and is intended for mature audiences.

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 8 (preview)
  • 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9
  • 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10
  • 2 & 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12

Location
Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets

Tickets to Her Naked Skin are $27-31 adults, $17-20 non-UC students and $15-18 UC students with a valid ID. Tickets to the Feb. 8 preview performance are just $15.

Student rush tickets will be sold one hour before each performance to non-UC students for $12-15, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid ID, also based on availability.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online at ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/mainstage/her-naked-skin.

Parking and Directions

Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
___________________

Season Presenting Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Mainstage Season Production Sponsor: Macy’s

CCM News Student Salutes

Alumni, Students Unite to Create Lovecraftian Halloween Experience, ‘The Other Rhine’

Each year CCM graduates thousands of students who go on to work across the country in all facets of the arts. But it sure is nice when our stars return home to share their craft.

The Other Rhine, a haunting theatrical collaboration by Know Theatre and Hit The Lights! Theater Co., features the work of CCM alumni and even some current students as they unite to create an intriguing Halloween spectacle that is unique to the Queen City.

CCM students and alumni in co-production of 'The Other Rhine' by Know Theatre and Hit The Lights.

CCM students and alumni in co-production of ‘The Other Rhine’ by Know Theatre and Hit The Lights.

Part walking tour and part haunted house, The Other Rhine guides audience members through The Mockabee and the Reliance Metal building in Cincinnati’s Brewery District to create an immersive theater experience. The show opened Friday night and runs though Halloween. It begins with an invitation:

Join us for the Bring Bellevue Brewery and Beerhall Back tour! Our Executive Director Scott Kaufman will lead you on a journey back into Cincinnati history to learn about brewing and the intriguing story of those who made beer at the old brewery.

With your help, we can bring the Bellevue Brewery back to its former glory!

“Audiences should expect to have fun, be thrilled, uncover some dark secrets of Cincinnati history and have nightmares,” said Mikayla Stanley (BFA Drama, 2011), of The Other Rhine.

Stanley founded Hit the Lights with Casey Scott Leach (BFA Drama ’10) and Kristopher Dean (BFA Drama ‘12) in 2013. The group also includes Claron Hayden (BFA Drama, 2012) and Carli Rhoades (BFA Drama, 2015). Hit The Lights’ productions typically center around shadow puppetry and use darkness and light to tell stories.

“We were interested in building an artistic agreement using the tools we learned at CCM, specifically those learned in Transmigration, the CCM student-led theatre festival held each winter that began while we were in school,” Stanley said.

After Hit the Lights’ production, “dungeon,” won Audience Pick at Know Theatre’s Cincy Fringe Festival in 2015, the two groups began to develop The Other Rhine. “The Know Theatre has created such an engaging and welcoming community atmosphere with their Fringe that we soon became friends and colleagues,” Stanley said.

Know’s Artistic Director, Andrew Hungerford (MFA Lighting Design and Technology, 2005), approached Hit the Lights with the H.P. Lovecraft-inspired concept for The Other Rhine. Neither group has done a show quite like it before.

“It’s an immersive theatrical experience that will really blur the lines between the world of the show and reality,” said Michaela Tropeano, a senior CCM Acting student involved with the show. “No two experiences at The Other Rhine will be alike. The audience is truly a piece of the puzzle.”

Like Hit the Lights, Know Theatre has several CCM alumni in its ranks including Hungerford, Design & Production Associate Sarah Beth Hall (BFA Scenic Design, 2014), Managing Director Alice Flanders (BFA Stage Management 2012) and Technical Director Nick Koehlke (CCM, 2007-12).

 There are also seven current CCM students that are cast in The Other Rhine: Tropeano and her fellow Acting majors Sarah Durham, Ryan Garrett, Spencer Lackey, Julia Netzer and Josh Reiter, as well as Musical Theatre major Marissa Hecker.

“Working with CCM students is always amazing, particularly since we all went through the same training and have the same theatrical vocabulary,” Stanley said. “The students, mainly due to the training given to them by powerhouse instructor Richard Hess, have an incredible work ethic and are game to try anything. This is especially important in a project like this, given that it is so experimental.”

Tropeano felt the same kinship with the CCM alumni that Stanley experienced with the current students.

“Our similar training and kindred dispositions make it all come together very organically,” she said. “Working with Hit the Lights has been an invaluable opportunity to see how these four years of training fare outside of CCM, and witnessing the brilliance of Hit the Lights makes me excited to know that this is only the start.”

You can see these CCM students and alumni in The Other Rhine through Halloween. For performance and ticket information, visit Know Theatre’s website at http://knowtheatre.com/the-other-rhine/.

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Story by CCM graduate student Alexandra Doyle

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News Student Salutes
Richard Hess taught a Viewpoints Training master calss in Estonia.

Acting Department Chair Visits Estonia To Teach Viewpoints Training Master Classes

Richard Hess traveled to Estonia to teach two Viewpoints Training master classes

Richard Hess at the Tartu Uus Teater.

CCM Professor of Acting and Department Chair Richard Hess recently traveled to Northern Europe to teach Viewpoints Training master classes to professional actors working in two Estonian theaters — Theatrum and Tartu Uus Teater.

Hess has shared Viewpoints Training master classes across the U.S. and internationally for the past 20 years. Initially developed for dancers in the 1970s by choreographer Mary Overlie, Viewpoints Training was then adapted for actors by director Anne Bogart and the SITI Company. It focuses on improvisational movement techniques that brake down two dominant issues performers deal with — time and space — into nine categories or “viewpoints”: tempo, duration, kinesthetic response, repetition, shape, spatial relationship, architecture, floor pattern and gesture.

Hess engaged the Estonian actors in a series of improvisational movement exercises where unified group action was the desired goal. “What you create with another actor is always more interesting than what you can create alone,” Hess said. “Needing and being needed are core principles of good acting.”

In the final exercise of the master class, Hess instructed the actors to pair up and — without speaking or planning — support a portion of their partner’s body weight to create a new shape that they couldn’t create alone. Hess first told them to support 50 percent of their partner’s weight, then directed everyone to support the entire weight of one person. “This requires actors to give generously and to be supportive in undeniable ways,” he said.

In the final Viewpoints exercise, Hess told the actors "all hands must support the entire weight of Karl Edgar."

In the final Viewpoints exercise, Hess told the actors “all hands must support the entire weight of Karl Edgar.”

“The Estonian actors were so powerful and focused,” Hess added. “There is an obvious muscular quality to their work and it was gratifying to see them embrace the master class with enthusiasm and bravery. Estonian theatre is extremely impressive.”

The actors traveled from theaters across Estonia to participate in Hess’ Viewpoints Training master class, he said. They gathered in Uus Teater in Tartu, Estonia and Theatrum, which is headed by playwright and director Andri Luup in Tallinn, Estonia. Luup, who is known for writing and directing the film “Kinnunen,” arranged for Hess to offer the master classes.

“The work was simply on the nose,” said participant Karl Edgar Tammi, a professional actor from the Teater Must Kast in Tartu. “I was introduced to a set of great exercises, improvisation, stage presence and awareness, creativity, working with partners, space and, of course, music. It was colorful, refreshing and inspiring. I will practice and try and mix it into the current theatre scape of Estonia!”

As chair of CCM’s Acting Department for the past 22 years, Hess has taught actors who work throughout the world on stage, television and film. He is no stranger to traveling internationally in the name of theatre. In 2011, Hess brought eight CCM Acting students and alumni to Kenya as part of the Dadaab Theatre Project. He returned to Kenya in 2014 as a Fulbright Scholar and spent a semester teaching and conducting research at Kenyatta University’s Department of Theatre Arts and Film Technology. In 2015, Hess brought six students and one faculty member from Kenyatta University to CCM so they could participate in the 48-Hour Film Festival.

Look for a Village News post later this week about Hess’ upcoming production of Middletown, running in Cohen Family Studio Theatre Oct. 20-22 as part of CCM’s Studio Acting Series. Admission is free but reservations are required. Tickets become available at noon on Monday, Oct. 17.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare
Romeo and Juliet preview photography by Mark Lyons.

Q&A with DAAP Student Hope Rice, Dramaturg for CCM’s “Romeo and Juliet”

This week, CCM opens the Fall 2016 Mainstage Season with William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. For this production, the creative team includes a collaboration with a senior art history major from UC’s College of Design, Art, Architecture and Planning (DAAP). Hope Rice teams up with the Romeo and Juliet crew to bring the show together as its “dramaturg.”

But what exactly is a dramaturg? And how is the role used for Romeo and Juliet? CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies reached out to Rice to find out more about her role in the production.

Rice’s interest in theatre was sparked after she took a few classes with CCM assistant professor of acting, Brant Russell — who also directs the upcoming production of Romeo and Juliet. She was then invited to join CCM’s TRANSMIGRATION in 2015 and is now pursuing an independent study in dramaturgy with Christine Mok, assistant professor of drama and performance in UC’s McMicken College of Arts and Sciences.

It’s always exciting to cast students from multiple departments in CCM productions. As a DAAP student, however, your involvement is unique. What was your experience like when you were previously cast in CCM’s TRANSMIGRATION?
I got to work with seven CCM Acting students in writing and performing our play. I became intimately acquainted with the logistics of writing a short play, the rehearsal and technical process and the performance. I had a small role with no speaking lines (at my request) because I originally wanted to be involved from a writing and directing position. My favorite experience from TRANSMIGRATION was getting to know the members of my team and creating a play that was meaningful to all of us. I also learned how collaboration and accountability are an intrinsic part of the process of getting the play from script to stage.

What is your role as dramaturg for Romeo and Juliet?
There are a lot of different ways to describe dramaturgy. Not just in this production, but in all shows, dramaturgs help to support the director’s vision by making sure that all elements that make up the play are coherent. Dramaturgs act as an outside eye to see connections between the script, actors and audience. So in the rehearsal process, dramaturgs observe acting, blocking, set design, sounds, etc. and take notes. We then meet with the director after rehearsals and discuss our thoughts. Dramaturgs support the concept of the play and help the director find elements to refine and enhance that vision.

How has your degree and experience in DAAP helped you in this role?
I am a senior in the art history program in DAAP with a focus in film studies. The art history program has taught me how to take apart an art work and analyze its pieces within the whole, while also considering its social, political and economic context and consequences. Dramaturging a play uses some of the same types of critical thinking.

What have you learned from working on Romeo and Juliet?
Besides TRANSMIGRATION, I have not seen a play develop from start to finish, so I have learned what that process is like from Romeo and Juliet. Specifically, I’ve been able to see how all the elements of a play — directing, acting, sound, light, design, dramaturgy, etc. — all collaborate and work to produce the show. Most importantly, I’ve learned that theatre would not be possible without collaboration. The CCM Acting program has a close community within and outside the theatre, and I’ve been able to see how that contributes to the magic of CCM productions.

Hope Rice will join CCM again in the spring for the annual TRANSMIGRATION festival. Catch a performance of CCM’s Romeo and Juliet this weekend to see her contribution as dramaturg reflected on stage.

Romeo and Juliet opens on Wednesday, Sept. 28 (preview) and runs through Sunday, Oct. 2 at CCM’s Patricia Corbett Theater.
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Performance Times
• 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28 (preview)
• 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29
• 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30
• 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1
• 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2

Location
Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Tickets to Romeo and Juliet are $27-31 for adults, $17-20 for non-UC students and $15-18 for UC students with a valid ID. Tickets to the Sept. 28 preview performance are just $15.

Student rush tickets will be sold one hour before each performance to non-UC students for $12 or $15, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid ID, based on availability.

Customizable subscription packages are also available for CCM’s 2016-17 Mainstage Series.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online at ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/mainstage/romeo-and-juliet.

Parking and Directions

Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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CCM Season Presenting Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Mainstage Season Production Sponsor: Macy’s

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Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes
Romeo and Juliet preview photography by Mark Lyons.

CCM Opens 2016-17 Mainstage Series with a Retelling of “Romeo and Juliet”

The University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music opens its 2016-17 Mainstage Series with a preview performance of William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet on Wednesday, Sept. 28 in Patricia Corbett Theater.  With this modern production of the Bard’s beloved tragedy, director Brant Russell aims to preserve Shakespeare’s intentions and give CCM students the opportunity to bring these iconic roles to life.

CCM’s retelling of Romeo and Juliet weaves the familiar story of ill-fated young love with a modern comedic twist. “It’s a comedy…until it’s not,” said Assistant Professor of Acting Brant Russell.

“What I’m hoping the audience will take away from this is everything that CCM does so well; lavish production values and excellent young actors coming together to tell a story that means something to everyone,” Russell said. “Everything an audience has come to expect from CCM and its eye-popping productions will be present in this show.”

Romeo & Juliet

Photography by Mark Lyons.

CCM Acting seniors Spencer Lackey and Katie McDonald play the title roles — an experience that would be a dream come true for many young actors. Russell is happy to showcase fresh faces, which is what the script actually calls for. According to the play’s text, Juliet is almost 14 years old and Romeo’s age is never explicitly mentioned.

“This production puts the beauty and eloquence of Shakespeare’s language front and center, but, in the mouths of these young actors, you’ll hear the language like you’ve never heard it before,” Russell said.

Romeo and Juliet opens on Wednesday, Sept. 28 (preview) and runs through Sunday, Oct. 2 at the CCM’s Patricia Corbett Theater.
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Creative Team
• Brant Russell, director
• Whitney Glover, scenic designer*
• Nick Saiki, lighting designer*
• Jeremy Lee, sound designer
• Sean K. Tingle, sound designer*
• Raphael Regan, costume designer*
• Erin Schwob, wig and make-up designer*
• Hope Rice, dramaturg*
• Brianna Latrash, choreographer*
• Hamilton Moore, choreographer*
• k. Jenny Jones, fight choreographer
• Andi Radujkovic, stage manager*
* CCM student

Cast List
Owen Alderson as Capulet
• Carissa Cardy as Montague
• Jabari Carter as Gregory
• Clare Combest as Lady Capulet
• Jacqueline Daaleman as Lady Montague/ Chorus 1
• Gabriella Divincenzo as Friar Lawrence’s Assistant/ Watchman
• Sarah Durham as Watchwoman
• James Egbert as Friar Lawrence
• Ryan Garrett as Paris
• Annie Grove as Mercutio
• Landon Hawkins as Tybalt
• Carter La Cava as Sampson/ Watchman
• Spencer Lackey as Romeo
• Katie Langham as Nurse/ Actor
• Katie McDonald as Juliet
• Julia Netzer as Abraham/ Apothecary/ Watchman
• Josh Reiter as Balthasar
• Mickey Tropeano as Benvolio
• Emily Walton as Prince

Performance Times
• 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28 (preview)
• 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29
• 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30
• 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1
• 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2

Location
Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Tickets to Romeo and Juliet are $27-31 for adults, $17-20 for non-UC students and $15-18 for UC students with a valid ID. Tickets to the Sept. 28 preview performance are just $15.

Student rush tickets will be sold one hour before each performance to non-UC students for $12 or $15, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid ID, based on availability.

Customizable subscription packages are also available for CCM’s 2016-17 Mainstage Series.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online at ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/mainstage/romeo-and-juliet.

Parking and Directions

Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Mainstage Season Production Sponsor: Macy’s

____________________

Story by CCM graduate student Alexandra Doyle

CCM News

Freshmen Acting Students find Bill Clinton during CCM Scavenger Hunt

Bill Clinton’s surprise visit to Graeter’s Ice Cream shop will likely leave a lasting impression on a few CCM Acting students who found him during an annual scavenger hunt Monday afternoon.

Each year, CCM “Acting I” students are sent on a Labor Day weekend scavenger hunt to explore Cincinnati staples such as Findlay Market, Washington Park and Fountain Square. The student teams will create original theatrical compositions to present to the rest of the class based on their scavenger hunt experiences this week.

“Our students come to Cincinnati from across the U.S., and, rather than sitting in their dorms on their first holiday weekend, I want them to conquer Cincinnati together and learn that it is a place in which to play,” said CCM Professor of Acting Richard Hess. “A student who immerses herself in our city learns that artists must draw from the life that surrounds us.”

This year, students found an unexpected surprise and completed an unassigned stop on their scavenger hunt: Find a former U.S. President.

CCM Acting students Paige Lindsay Jordan and Matt Fox with former president Bill Clinton.

CCM Acting students Paige Lindsay Jordan and Matt Fox with former president Bill Clinton.

Freshmen Acting students Paige Lindsay Jordan, Nick King, Will Clark and Matt Fox found former U.S. President Bill Clinton at Graeter’s Ice Cream shop while he was in Cincinnati to support his wife Hillary Clinton’s local presidential campaign efforts.

Hess said the encounter was a shock to the students, who may incorporate the chance meeting in their original work to share with classmates.

CCM News Student Salutes
CCM Drama major Bartley Booz in the E-Media short film 'Solitude.'

What’s in a name? CCM ‘Drama’ is now ‘Acting’ department

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music’s Drama Department will now be known as the Acting Department to better reflect the scope of training and experiences designed to take students beyond the stage to work in various mediums of performance. In addition, the new CCM Acting Department will offer the BFA in Acting instead of the BFA in Dramatic Performance.

Once housed in the McMicken College of Arts and Sciences, the Drama Department had a long history of teaching theatre in a liberal arts setting and once offered the BA in Theatre Arts. The department moved to CCM in 1983 with a new focus and degree, the BFA in Dramatic Performance. The focus at the time was exclusively on the stage and the study of theatre and drama.

Student filmmaker Eric Mwangi working in Nairobi, Kenya.

Student filmmaker Eric Mwangi working in Nairobi, Kenya.

Fast-forward 33 years — graduates of the program are finding work from coast to coast and internationally in film, television, commercials, voice-overs and on stage. CCM Acting trains actors for all media and offers students acting experience in a variety of mediums.

“Our degree name sounded like an antique, with a limited focus on the stage,” said CCM Professor of Acting Richard Hess. “But that’s no longer true. We train actors. The ‘triple threats’ we create in CCM Acting are students who can succeed on stage, film, and in the creation of new works.”

In recent years, the new Acting Department has embraced various multimedia efforts to give students a well-rounded education in acting. The department worked with CCM’s E-Media program to create a 48-Hour Film Festival and to shoot an original film with the new Digital Media Collaborative.

CCM Drama’s name change to Acting will go into effect immediately. “We have often said, ‘we make actors.’ Now we match,” Hess said. “Our new identity will position our strength more clearly to the world.”

CCM News
CCM Drama's class of 2016.

CCM Drama Holds Annual Senior Showcase and Dolly Awards on March 18, 2016

CCM Drama's class of 2016.

CCM Drama’s class of 2016.

CCM’s Department of Drama presents its 2016 Senior Showcase at 2 and 7 p.m. on Friday, March 18, in Patricia Corbett Theater. The annual DOLLY Awards ceremony follows the 7 p.m. showcase performance and includes the recognition of an outstanding alumnus of the program. These events are free and open to the public. Reservations are not required.

The showcase performance will consist of a variety of scenes by graduating seniors in CCM’s Drama program, demonstrating the depth and breadth of the acting skills they have honed during their undergraduate training at CCM. The Senior Showcase will be the first presentation of a performance that the students will be taking on the road to exhibit their talent in New York and Los Angeles. You can learn more about the Drama Class of 2016 by visiting ccm.uc.edu/theatre/drama/seniorshowcase-classof2016.

Hosted by Professor Richard E. Hess, CCM’s A.B., Dolly, Ralph and Julia Cohen Chair of Dramatic Performance, the annual CCM Drama DOLLY Awards recognize the outstanding achievements and performances of students in the Department of Drama. Awards are given for Excellence in Performance and Excellence in Ensemble Performance from the 2015-16 CCM Drama season, which included the productions TRANSMIGRATION 2015, You’re Welcome: A Cycle of Bad Plays, Pentecost, The Hunchback of Seville and Ah, Wilderness!.

CCM Drama alumnus Michael Littig in Africa in 2011.

CCM Drama alumnus Michael Littig in Africa in 2011.

The highlight of the Dolly Awards ceremony will be the presentation of the 2016 Julia Winter Cohen Career Excellence Award to a graduate of CCM Drama. This year’s honoree is alumnus Michael Littig (BFA Drama, 2005).

Littig has worked as an actor, teaching artist and theatre maker. As an actor, his US credits include NYSF/Public Theater, Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey, Portland Stage Company, Los Angeles Theater Center, Z Space, Hangar Theater, the Utah Shakespeare Festival and the Hippodrome Theatre as a resident company member.

Internationally, Littig has performed in A Dreamplay (United Arab Emirates), Juárez: A Documentary Mythology (Mexico/UAE/Lebanon), HEARTPIECE (Mongolia) and Hamlet/Ur Hamlet (UAE) as an associate artist with New York/Abu Dhabi-based Theater Mitu. In addition, Littig has diligently continued various global research initiatives towards a continuous development and articulation of Theater Mitu’s training methodology of “Whole Theater.”

Littig has served on faculty at the NYU Graduate Actor Training Program, Shakespeare Society, Stella Adler Conservatory and is a co-founder of the Patrick Page Studio in New York. His awards and recognition include a NEA Arts Works grant, a NEFA Touring grant and a Fulbright Fellowship to examine the relationship between a shaman and an actor in Mongolia.

Littig is the founder of the Great Globe Foundation and the Dadaab Theater Project. The work of the Great Globe Foundation has facilitated artistic collaborations with the United Nations High Council for Refugees, US State Department, Save the Children and FilmAid International. At present time, the Dadaab Theater Project continues in Africa in collaboration with Real Life Poets, a poetry exchange program between Alabama students and refugees living in Kenya.

Performance Times
2 and 7 p.m. Friday, March 18

Location
Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission Details
Admission to the CCM Drama Senior Showcase and DOLLY Awards Ceremony is FREE and open to the general public. Reservations are not required.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

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CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Community Partner: ArtsWave

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