The Robert J. Werner Recital Hall at UC's College-Conservatory of Music.

CCM Announces Memorial Service for Alumna and Former Faculty Member Barbara Clark (Paver)

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) will celebrate the life and teaching legacy of Barbara Clark (Paver), DMA, in a memorial service scheduled for 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17, in CCM’s Robert J. Werner Recital Hall. A reception in the Baur Room will follow. A video stream of the service will be available at ccm.uc.edu/resources/technology/barbaraclarkmemorial. A CCM alumna and a beloved member of our faculty from 2004-13, Clark passed away unexpectedly on Sept. 2, 2018.

CCM alumna and former faculty member Barbara Clark (Paver).

CCM alumna and former faculty member Barbara Clark (Paver).

Most recently an Associate Professor of Voice and Chair of Voice at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music, Clark began her teaching career at the Crane School of Music in Potsdam, New York. A highly-regarded teacher and artist, Clark taught a generation of students, many of whom are now performing in leading opera houses and festivals all over the world. Blessed with a lustrous, beautiful voice and a keen intelligence, she was also a sought-after soprano soloist who enjoyed a distinguished performing career. She will be remembered as a gifted teacher and mentor, a compassionate and generous friend known by all for both her good humor, and her kind and loving nature.

A native of Ann Arbor, Michigan, Clark received a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Arizona and a master’s and doctorate from CCM. She was a treasured aunt and sister, and is survived by her sisters Susan Clark Joul and Jill Meiburg, and her brother Robert Clark. In addition, she is survived by her beloved niece Ivy Brooke Joul, and nephews Henry, Sebastian, and Maxwell Meiburg. She is also survived by brothers-in-law Thomas Meiburg and Kent Joul, in addition to her many current and former students.

The CCM community sends its deepest condolences to Clark’s family and friends. Her impact on her family, students and colleagues remains immeasurable.

CCM News
Old 'Thinking About Music' lecture logo.

CCM’s Thinking About Music Lecture Series Resumes On Friday, Jan. 27

Each semester, CCM welcomes distinguished experts for a series of free Friday afternoon musical discussions. This spring, the Thinking About Music lecture series will present four free public talks, beginning with a presentation on Arnold Schoenberg and the 1913 Scandal Concert by Vanderbilt University Professor of Musicology Joy H. Calico on Friday, Jan. 27.

Schoenberg caricature originally published in 'Die Zeit' on April 6, 1913.

Schoenberg caricature originally published in ‘Die Zeit’ on April 6, 1913.

Sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, these music theory and history discussions feature diverse topics presented by distinguished experts from all over the United States and are designed to engage participants’ imaginations and to consider music in new ways.

This semester’s guest lecturers also include University of Kentucky Professor Donna Kwon (Feb. 10), Case Western Reserve University Professor Francesca Brittan (March 3) and Bowling Green State University Professor Per Broman (April 7). See the listings below for more information on this semester’s presentation topics.

Since its inception in 1997, the Thinking About Music Series has presented over 130 lectures and one symposium by guests from a number of different colleges, universities, schools of music, foundations, institutes, museums and publications.

The subjects of the lectures have covered historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, along with the ancillary fields of organology, dance, music business and law, cognitive psychology, and the philosophy, theology and sociology of music.
____________________

2017 SPRING JOSEPH AND FRANCES JONES POETKER THINKING ABOUT MUSIC LECTURE SERIES

TAM guest lecturer Joy Calico.2:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27
ARNOLD SCHOENBERG AND THE 1913 SCANDAL CONCERT
Joy H. Calico, Vanderbilt University

On March 31 of 1913, Arnold Schoenberg conducted a concert in the Great Hall of Vienna’s Musikverein, which became known as the city’s most notorious scandal concert. The event was broken up by a melee, charges were filed and the subsequent court proceedings were reported in the press. This lecture analyzes the ways in which both the scandal and Schoenberg’s response to it sit at the nexus of fin-de-siècle anxieties about Central European concert life, the anti-noise movement and emerging copyright law.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
____

TAM guest lecturer Donna Kwon.2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10
STEPPING IN THE MADANG: SITE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE IN KOREAN DRUMMING AND DANCE
Donna Kwon, University of Kentucky

In Korean folk expressive culture, the outdoor village courtyard or madang is often conceived in opposition to the concert stage or mudae. In this presentation, Donna Kwon will discuss how the madang became central to the promotion of site-specific Korean drumming and dance. She will first discuss how this contributes to the expressive ecology of a place-based tradition in shamanist ritual forms of Korean drumming or p’ungmul. Then she will explore how the madang and site-specific performance concepts are applied by contemporary ch’angjak yeonhui groups. These groups consist of performers who are trained in Korean drumming and other traditional performing arts but who combine them into new works.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
____

TAM guest lecturer Francesca Brittan.2:30 p.m. Friday, March 3
ELECTRIC BATON: SOUND, SCIENCE AND THE BIRTH OF THE PODIUM CONDUCTOR
Francesca Brittan, Case Western Reserve University

Hector Berlioz, among the first of the modern conductors, was a larger-than-life figure, at once magisterial, quasi-magical and military. Among the formative moments of his conducting career was a concert given at the height of the Exposition universelle (Paris, 1855), which established him as a musical leader of formidable power. Here he relied on a new wedding of music and technology — an “electric baton” — to wield the massive forces under his command. This talk examines the nature of his device and, more broadly, the ways in which telegraphy and electricity (both artificial and nervous) emerged as central to romantic notions of conducting.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
____

TAM guest lecturer Per Broman.2:30 p.m. Friday, Apr. 7
BERGMAN’S MUSIC(IANS): MIRROR AND MEANING
Per Broman, Bowling Green State University

Ingmar Bergman’s love of classical music, especially that of J.S. Bach, is well known and is exhibited frequently in his films. Many films also feature musicians. In this presentation, Broman will analyze the role of these characters — who they are, what they do, how they behave and what they talk about — and argue that they are essential for understanding Bergman’s aesthetics.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
___________________

Event Information
Unless otherwise indicated, all Thinking About Music lectures take place on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. in the Baur Room of CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts, which is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

These events are free and open to the public. All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu for the most current event information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
___________________

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

CCM’s Thinking About Music Series is sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, Ritter & Randolph, LLC, Corporate Counsel; along with support from Interim Dean mcclung’s Office, the Graduate Student Association and the Division of Composition, Musicology and Theory at CCM.

 

 

CCM News
Old 'Thinking About Music' lecture logo.

CCM’s Thinking About Music Lecture Series Opens Friday, Sept. 9

Each semester, CCM welcomes distinguished experts for a series of free Friday afternoon musical discussions. This fall, the Thinking About Music lecture series will present four free public talks, beginning with a presentation by Indiana University Jacobs School of Music Professor Halina Goldberg on Friday, Sept. 9, held as part of CCM’s Fall Polish Festival.

CCM's Fall 2016 Thinking About Music Lecture Series schedule.Sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, these music theory and history discussions feature diverse topics presented by distinguished experts from all over the United States and are designed to engage participants’ imaginations and to consider music in new ways.

This semester’s guest lecturers also include University of Alabama Professor Stephen Peles (Sept. 16), Yale University Professor Brian Kane (Sept. 30) and Miami University Professor Tammy Kernodle (Oct. 28). See the listings below for more information on this semester’s presentation topics.

Since its inception in 1997, the Thinking About Music Series has presented nearly 130 lectures and one symposium by guests from a number of different colleges, universities, schools of music, foundations, institutes, museums and publications.

The subjects of the lectures have covered historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, along with the ancillary fields of organology, dance, music business and law, cognitive psychology, and the philosophy, theology and sociology of music.

____________________

2016 FALL JOSEPH AND FRANCES JONES POETKER THINKING ABOUT MUSIC LECTURE SERIES

CCM's Thinking About Music Lecture Series welcomes Halina Goldberg on Sept. 9, 2016.2:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9
THE NATIONAL COMPOSER / THE COSMOPOLITAN COMPOSER: IN SEARCH OF POLISH (?) MUSIC
Halina Goldberg, Jacobs School of Music

Dr. Halina Goldberg, acknowledged as one of the world’s foremost experts on Polish music, will present a lecture on aspects of Polish art and culture.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE

Polish Festival Sponsor: Judith Heiny and Piotr Chomczynski
____

CCM's Thinking About Music Lecture Series welcomes Stephen Peles on Sept. 16, 2016.2:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16
HOW THE GIVEN IS TAKEN: BABBITT, PRINCETON AND THE PSYCHOLOGIZATION OF POSTWAR AMERICAN MUSIC ANALYSIS
Stephen Peles, University of Alabama

The public controversy engendered by Babbitt’s call for a “scientific” music theory has tended to overshadow other more enduring aspects of his meta-theoretical program. This lecture argues for the significance to Babbitt’s legacy of his insistence on the centrality of the listener (real and imagined) to analytic claims.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
____

CCM's Thinking About Music Lecture Series welcomes Brian Kane on Sept. 30, 2016.2:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30
HEARING DOUBLE: JAZZ ONTOLOGY
Brian Kane, Yale University
Philosophers have often considered the ontology of music, worrying over the relation between works, scores and performances — yet jazz has not received the same consideration. This lecture argues for a non-essentialist, network-based ontology of jazz standards.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
____

CCM's Thinking About Music Lecture Series welcomes Tammy Kernodle on Oct. 28, 2016.2:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28
I TOO SING AMERICA: BLACK WOMEN MUSICIANS, LANGSTON HUGHES AND THE ADVANCEMENT OF BLACK RADICAL EXPRESSIVE CULTURE IN COLD WAR ERA AMERICA
Tammy Kernodle, Miami University

This talk will explore how poet/activist Langston Hughes’ collaborations with Margaret Bonds, Odetta and Nina Simone provided the foundation for the type of radical expressive culture that advanced, musically, the ideals of political and social equality during the 1950s and 1960s.
Location: Baur Room
Admission: FREE
____________________

Event Information

Unless otherwise indicated, all Thinking About Music lectures take place on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. in the Baur Room of CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts, which is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

These events are free and open to the public. All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu for the most current event information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

____________________

A preeminent institution for the performing and media arts, CCM is the largest single source of performing arts presentations in the state of Ohio.

All event dates and programs are subject to change. For a complete calendar of events, please visit us online at ccm.uc.edu.

CCM News
Old 'Thinking About Music' lecture logo.

CCM’s ‘Thinking About Music’ Lecture Series Resumes on Jan. 29, 2016

Each semester, CCM welcomes distinguished experts for a series of free Friday afternoon musical discussions. This spring, the Thinking About Music lecture series will present five free public talks, beginning with a presentation by Indiana University Jacobs School of Music Professor Blair Johnston on Friday, Jan. 29.

CCM's Spring 2016 'Thinking About Music' Schedule.

CCM’s Spring 2016 ‘Thinking About Music’ Schedule.

Sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, these music theory and history discussions feature diverse topics presented by distinguished experts from all over the United States and are designed to engage participants’ imaginations and to consider music in new ways.

This semester’s guest lecturers also include University of California at Los Angeles Professor Daniel Neuman (Feb. 26), Yale University Professor Brian Kane (March 11), Cornell University Professor Annette Richards (April 1) and Tufts University Professor Emerita Janet Schmalfeldt (April 15). See the listings below for more information on this semester’s presentation topics.

Since its inception in 1997, the Thinking About Music Series has presented nearly 130 lectures and one symposium by guests from a number of different colleges, universities, schools of music, foundations, institutes, museums and publications.

The subjects of the lectures have covered historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, along with the ancillary fields of organology, dance, music business and law, cognitive psychology, and the philosophy, theology and sociology of music.

Event Information
Unless otherwise indicated, all Thinking About Music lectures take place on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. in the Baur Room of CCM’s Corbett Center for the Performing Arts, which is located on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.

These events are free and open to the public. All event dates and programs are subject to change. Visit ccm.uc.edu for the most current event information.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

____________________

2016 SPRING JOSEPH AND FRANCES JONES POETKER THINKING ABOUT MUSIC LECTURE SERIES

'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Blair Johnston.2:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 29
ORCHESTRATIONAL SCENARIOS IN THE MUSIC OF SIBELIUS
Blair Johnston, Indiana University

Orchestration—and, with it, the roles that timbre plays in musical rhetoric, expressive trajectories, and the choices made by performers—deserves more attention from scholars than it has received. In an ongoing project, Blair Johnston is examining the rich ways that orchestrational choices in post-Romantic symphonic works interact with the “structures” described by more conventional music analysis, an area that features music-theoretic vocabularies that do not always allow for easy discussion of certain dimensions of sound—in broad terms, its shapes, its colors, its densities—that are especially essential in music from this era. This talk will explore this through the use of late symphonic works by Sibelius (excerpts from the Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Symphonies and Tapiola), music in which complex approaches to musical form and material are fused to a highly individual orchestrational language—indeed, music in which there may be almost no line between form, material and timbre.
Location: 
Baur Room
____

'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Daniel Neuman.2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 26
MUSIC INHERITANCE AND HEREDITARY MUSICIANS: INDIA TODAY, THE WEST IN THE PAST
Daniel Neuman, University of California at Los Angeles

In this talk, Daniel Neuman considers the role of hereditary musicians in India in the recent past as well as today, as they become increasingly rare in the Hindustani classical music world. Some comparative gestures to Western classical music (and in particular J.S. Bach) highlight the important roles that genealogy, pedigree and biography play as different kinds of authentication markers and historical sources in each classical music practice.
Location: 
Baur Room
____

'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Brian Kane.

Brian Kane’s March 11 lecture has been canceled. Stay tuned for information on his rescheduled presentation.
2:30 p.m. Friday, March 11
HEARING DOUBLE: JAZZ AND ONTOLOGY
Brian Kane, Yale University

Philosophers have often considered the ontology of music, worrying over the relation between works, scores and performances. Yet, surprisingly, jazz has not received the same consideration, even though jazz—where performances of works such as “standards” vary widely in their properties—represents an even more challenging ontological problem than found in classical music. In this talk, Brian Kane will argue for a non-essentialist, network-based ontology of jazz standards. This argument will depend on two basic operations—chains of replication and chains of nomination—that together provide a robust basis for judgments concerning a performance’s identity and individuation. Also, just as jazz is an exemplification of a network-based ontology of music, Kane will try to draw out some wider implications for the ontology of music more generally.
Location: 
Baur Room

____

'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Annette Richards.2:30 p.m. Friday, April 1
SENSIBILITY TRIUMPHANT: C. P. E. BACH AND THE ART OF FEELING
Annette Richards, Cornell University

In Goethe’s Triumph der Empfindsamkeit (1777), sensibility, feeling and sympathy are brutally exposed as trivial obsessions with postures and props. Excess, bad taste and poor behavior are the focus of Goethe’s hilarious critique of the craze unleashed by his own Sorrows of Young Werther. Embodied in this strange and funny text is satire aimed not only at the cult of Empfindsamkeit and at the works of the artist himself, but also at the conspicuous blurring of public and private spheres, the untoward exposure of personal proclivities and private feeling. Given the ubiquitous textbook designation of C. P. E. Bach as the architect of the ‘Empfindsamer Stil’ in music, Dr. Annette Richards takes another look at what ‘Empfindsamkeit’ might mean, especially for the composer’s late keyboard works. By examining this music (along with then-contemporary views on humor, satire and other cultural elements), the audience may have to reconsider Bach’s own claims about the competing aesthetics of public and private music.
Location: 
Baur Room
____

'Thinking About Music' guest speaker Janet Schmalfeldt.

2:30 p.m. Friday, April 15
DOMENICO SCARLATTI, ESCAPE ARTIST: SIGHTINGS OF HIS “MIXED STYLE” TOWARDS THE END OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
Janet Schmalfeldt, Tufts University Professor Emerita/Boston University Visiting Professor
Location: Baur Room

____________________

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Community Partner: ArtsWave

CCM’s Thinking About Music Series is sponsored by the Joseph and Frances Jones Poetker Fund of the Cambridge Charitable Foundation, Ritter & Randolph, LLC, Corporate Counsel; along with support from Dean Landgren’s Office, the Graduate Student Association, and the Division of Composition, Musicology and Theory at CCM.

CCM News
Cincinnati World Piano Competition gold medal.

Cincinnati World Piano Competition Announces 2015 Finalists

After an incredible Semifinal Round on June 11, the 2015 Cincinnati World Piano Competition has its three finalists!

Congratulations to Artem Yasynskyy, Mei Rui and Nino Bakradze! You can learn more about each of these competitors below.

The final round will take place in Corbett Auditorium at 7 p.m. on Saturday, June 13, with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. The order of performance is as follows:

  • Mei Rui, United States
  • Artem Yasynskyy, Ukraine
  • Intermission
  • Nino Bakradze, Georgia

 The awards ceremony will follow immediately after the performances. Dessert and coffee with the medalists in CCM’s Baur Room will follow the awards ceremony.

Congratulations to all of our semi finalists and best of luck to our three final competitors! Order your tickets online at here.

Cincinnati World Piano Competition 2015 finalist Nino Bakradze.

CWPC 2015 finalist Nino Bakradze.

About Nino Bakradze
Nino Bakradze was born in Tbilisi, Georgia, into a family of musicians. From a very early age, she has presented piano recitals worldwide including Finland, Poland, Armenia, Georgia, China, Spain, Brazil and the USA. In 2014, she was a Prizewinner in Spain’s Maria Canals International Piano Competition, and in 2012, she was awarded Third Place at the BNDS International Piano Competition of Rio de Janeiro. She won both New England Conservatory’s Concerto Competition and the Piano Honors Competition. Ms. Bakradze was a prizewinner at the International A. Khachaturian Competition in Armenia, and at the J. Flier International Piano Competition. Awards from within her home country include First Place at the N. Gabunia National Competition and the R. Rozhok and E. Gurevich Young Georgian Piano Competitions.

During tomorrow’s performance, Bakradze will perform Rachmaninoff’s Concerto No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 30.

Cincinnati World Piano Competition 2015 finalist Mei Rui.

CWPC 2015 finalist Mei Rui.

About Mei Rui
Pianist Mei Rui’s playing has been praised as “riveting,” full of “dramatic tension and lucidity” by the Boston Globe. Dr. Rui graduated from Yale, and holds degrees in molecular biophysics and biochemistry and music. While pursuing her D.M.A., she taught as Visiting Professor of Organic and General Chemistry at the City University of New York.

In September 2013, Dr. Rui played to a sold-out audience with violinist Xiang Yu at the Louvre Museum in Paris, France. She has appeared at Yellowbarn, Taos, and Norfolk, and has collaborated with Itzhak Perlman, George Manahan, Shinik Hahm, Paul Katz and Roger Tapping.

At age 11, she made her orchestral debut soloing with the Beijing Radio Symphony and has since played with the Beijing Radio Symphony, Shanghai Philharmonic Orchestra and the Yale Philharmonic. Recently she recorded Eric Nathan’s solo works to be released by Albany Records in 2015.

During tomorrow’s performance, Rui will perform Rachmaninoff’s Concerto No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 30.

Cincinnati World Piano Competition 2015 finalist Artem Yasynskyy.

CWPC 2015 finalist Artem Yasynskyy.

About Artem Yasynskyy
Ukrainian pianist Artem Yasynskyy has appeared on many international stages. He has won prizes at major international piano competitions such as the Gina Bachauer Piano Artist Competition, the Sendai and Gian Battista Viotti Music competitions, as well as the Horowitz and First German competitions.

Mr. Yasynskyy has appeared at festivals such as the Bremer Musikfest, the Maggio Piano Festival Vercelli, the Summer Night Music Festival of Kiev, the Festival “Days of Slavic Culture” in Rome and the Polish Music Festival in Hamburg.

During tomorrow’s performance, Yasynskyy will perform Tchaikovsky’s Concerto No. 1 in B-flat Minor, Op. 23.

Performance Time
7 p.m., Saturday, June 13

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Tickets to the Cincinnati World Piano Competition Finals Concert start at $35. Purchase tickets through the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra website at www.cincinnatisymphony.org or by calling the CSO box office at 513-381-3300.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

CCM News
CCM welcomes guest artist Ghiglia, Oscar on Sunday, Oct. 8..

CCM Welcomes Classical Guitarist Oscar Ghiglia for 40th Anniversary Residency This Weekend

Guitar virtuoso Oscar Ghiglia.

Guitar virtuoso Oscar Ghiglia.

CCM’s Guest Artist Series welcomes legendary classical guitarist Oscar Ghiglia for a very special performance at 4 p.m. this Sunday, Oct. 12. This concert celebrates Ghiglia’s 40th residency at CCM! The performance is free and open to the general public.

CCM guitarists have been the enthusiastic beneficiaries of Ghiglia’s concerts and master classes since 1974. He is the major and, perhaps, most persuasive exponent of Andrés Segovia-inspired European guitar playing.

About Oscar Ghiglia
Oscar Ghiglia was born in Livorno, Italy, to a pianist mother and a painter father. While attending Rome’s Santa Cecilia Conservatory, he participated in Segovia’s summer master classes in Siena and Santiago de Compostela. His graduation from the Conservatory in 1962 was followed by several important awards: first prize in the Orense Guitar Competition, first prize in the Santiago de Compostela Guitar Competition and first prize in the Radio France International Guitar Competition.

In 1964, Andres Segovia invited Ghiglia to be his assistant in master classes in California. Since then, Ghiglia has given concerts and master classes throughout the world. In addition to appearing extensively in all parts of North and South America and Europe, he is a frequent performer in the Far East, Israel, Argentina, New Zealand and the South Pacific, and has recorded for Angel, Nonesuch and Stradivarius Records. While being active as a concert artist, Ghiglia has always favored teaching as a sister-profession. Very few well-known guitarists today have not at one time or another been in his classes and profited from his lessons.

Ghiglia is currently professor emeritus of guitar at the Basel Music-Akademie, and gives summer courses in Europe, America and the Middle East. He established the classical guitar summer program at Aspen, Colorado, and taught there for twenty years. He now regularly gives summer classes at the Festival d’Arc in southern France, at the Chigi Academy in Siena, Italy and at the Festival Gargnano, Italy. The Hartt School of Music awarded him an honorary doctorate in 2004 for his outstanding contributions to classical guitar teaching and performance. In 2009, the Guitar Foundation of America presented him with their prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award.

Repertoire

  • J.S. BACH: Prelude, Fugue and Allegro, BWV 998
  • FERNANDO SOR: Caprice “La Calme,” Op. 50
  • MANUEL DE FALLA: Homenaje “Le Tombeau de Debussy” (1920)
  • FRANK MARTIN: Quatre Pièces Brèves (1933)
  • MANUEL PONCE: Sonata Romantica (1928)

CCM News

CCM Celebrates the Career of Retiring Professor Terence Milligan in Concert on April 5

CCM Professor Terence Milligan will take the Corbett Auditorium podium for a special farewell concert on April 5. Photography by Lisa Ventre.

CCM Professor Terence Milligan will take the Corbett Auditorium podium for a special farewell concert on April 5. Photography by Lisa Ventre.

CCM celebrates the retirement of Professor Terence Milligan with a series of special events beginning at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 5. The CCM Wind Ensemble, the UC Bearcat Band, alumni members of Phi Alpha Sinfonia and other special guests will take part in the celebrations, which are free and open to the general public.

The pre-concert festivities begin at 7 p.m. with a pre-concert performance by the UC Bearcat Band in the CCM plaza. Milligan directed the Bearcat band from 1979-1992 and remains close friends with many of the band’s alumni.

A meet and greet in CCM’s Baur room will follow the Bearcat Band performance, culminating in the brass and percussion ensembles performing a special fanfare in the Corbett Center Atrium.

The concert will begin at 8:15 p.m. in Corbett Auditorium, featuring the Wind Ensemble, which will perform six different pieces, each holding a special meaning for Professor Milligan.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare

CCM Announces Performance Schedule for 2014 Moveable Feast

CCM’s annual Moveable Feast benefit event returns to the campus of the University of Cincinnati this Friday, Jan. 17, for an unparalleled evening of artistic and culinary delights.

Today, we are delighted to provide you with an advanced look at the schedule for this year’s feast! Click on the image below for a print-friendly copy.

Click on this image for a larger, print-friendly copy.

Click on this image for a larger, print-friendly copy.

Tickets to CCM’s 2014 Moveable Feast are on sale now and can be purchased online at ccm.uc.edu/support/events or ccm.weshareonline.org/MoveableFeast2014 or by calling 513-556-2100.

Learn even more about this event here.

CCM News

CCM Presents Cincinnati Premiere of Benjamin Britten’s Opera ‘Owen Wingrave,’ Nov. 21-24

From left to right: Edward Nelson as Owen Wingrave and Jason Weisinger as General Sir Phillip Wingrave in 'Owen Wingrave.' Photography by Mark Lyons.

From left to right: Edward Nelson as Owen Wingrave and Jason Weisinger as General Sir Phillip Wingrave in ‘Owen Wingrave.’ Photography by Mark Lyons.

CCM’s celebration of Benjamin Britten at 100 continues with the Cincinnati premiere of the composer’s penultimate opera Owen Wingrave, running Nov. 21-24 in Patricia Corbett Theater. CCM welcomes guest artist and alumnus Johannes Müller-Stosch to the podium for this Mainstage Series production, which features stage direction by CCM Professor of Voice Kenneth Shaw. The opera will be sung in English with supertitles.

Based on the 1893 Henry James short story of the same name and commissioned by the BBC in 1966, Owen Wingrave was completed for television in 1970. With music by Britten and a libretto by his frequent collaborator Myfanwy Piper, Shaw suggests that the opera offers “both drama and a touch of lightness, horror and hope, mystery and atmosphere, grandeur and intimacy.”

Owen Wingrave 
is often regarded as one of Britten’s most powerful scores. According to Shaw, the music of Owen Wingrave is exceptionally challenging, making it ideal for training students. The opera story is equally compelling and is centered on the titular Owen Wingrave, a pacifist born into a long line of military heroes who struggles to prove his inner strength to his disapproving family, even if it leads to his own mysterious end. “A secret is something that has resonance for all of us,” Shaw explains. “We keep secrets, and secrets are kept from us. For the Wingrave family, their secret doesn’t really have a full answer – it is a mystery.”

CCM News

CCM Winds, Jazz, Musical Theatre, Guitar And More On Display This Weekend!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

You will find something for everyone on the CCM stage this weekend!

At 8 p.m. this evening (Friday, April 12), the CCM Wind Orchestra closes out its successful 2012-13 season with a survey of contemporary American composers. The eclectic program will include works by Samuel Barber, Warren Benson and more! Learn more about this performance here.

CCM welcomes acclaimed tenor Lawrence Brownlee to the stage at 8 p.m. this Saturday, April 13, for an encore performance of the program from his recent Carnegie Hall debut. Brownlee will be accompanied by composer, conductor and pianist Damien Sneed for this special performance. Learn more about this performance here.

CCM’s Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Lab Band will celebrate the impact of adjunct instructor of jazz drums and “living guru of big band drumming” John Von Ohlen with a swinging tribute concert at 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 14. Learn more about this performance here.

CCM News