Preparatory Ballet Concert. Photography by Kyuran Ann Choe.

CCM Prep Presents Spring Youth Ballet This Weekend

CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement presents the Spring Youth Ballet Concert at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, May 3 and Saturday, May 4, 2019. CCM Prep’s young dancers will exhibit their skills by performing excerpts from the ballet repertoire and new works, including several choreographed by CCM Prep students.

This year, six graduating high school seniors choreographed original pieces that will be presented at the concert. In addition to these student-created works, the program also features Fireborn, choreographed by CCM Prep instructor Heather Cameron Johnson, as well as Umbrella Dreams, choreographed by CCM Prep instructor Ana Bird. These two pieces will showcase CCM Prep Dance’s Mini Company, with students ages 8 to 11, and the Junior Ballet Company, ages 11 to 13.

The second half of the program consists of excerpts from Ludwig Minkus’ Don Quixote. CCM Prep instructors Thomas Bell, Isabele Elefson, Jonnie Lynn Jacobs-Percer and Tricia Sundbeck staged and choreographed these excerpts, which are based on Marius Petipa’s original choreography. The performances will include the “Bridesmaids’ Dance,” “Kitri’s Variation,” and a grand ensemble finale, plus 15 other excerpts.

You can see the CCM Prep’s Spring Youth Ballet Concert this weekend in CCM’s Patricia Corbett Theater. Tickets are $15 general admission, $10 for non-UC students and FREE for UC students with valid ID. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 for more information.

Performance Times

  • 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 3
  • 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 4

Location
Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Tickets to CCM Prep’s Spring Youth Ballet Concert are $15 general, $10 non-UC students and FREE for UC students with a valid ID. Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online now through our e-Box Office! Visit ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice for CCM Box Office hours and location.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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Story by CCM Graduate Student Alexandra Doyle

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Offers Arts Classes to all UC Students in Fall 2019

 

CCM offers dozens of different general studies and fine arts elective courses in fall 2019. These credit-granting courses are open to all UC students and cover a wide range of topics including dance, movies and media, music and theatre arts!

Master the hip-hop dance moves seen in current music videos or learn the basics of modern dance and ballet in CCM’s dance classes. Film a digital video or binge-watch classic movies, Disney animated musicals and TV sitcoms in movie and media appreciation classes.

CCM’s music appreciation classes cover the music of Woodstock, The Beatles, Japanese Pop and more, or students can study women’s impact on music and the impact of music on politics. Students can also join UC Choruses or UC Symphony Orchestra, turn their laptops into musical instruments and jam with a virtual band, or learn how to play the piano and guitar in hands-on music performance classes.

In theatre appreciation classes students can study the history of theatre, explore how Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton revolutionized musical theatre, learn the craft of acting or stage design and more!

CCM’s fall 2019 arts elective classes are offered online or in person; view a complete list of class offerings below. Register for classes at https://www.catalyst.uc.edu.

Dance Performance Classes

Advanced Intermediate Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1020-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 2-3:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This course is intended for non-Dance majors with prior training in classical ballet at the advanced/intermediate level. It is repeatable and is offered each semester. The ballet class will consist of a traditional ballet barre followed by center practice and enchainment following the usual progression. A preexisting knowledge of the ballet French terminology is required in addition to the physical mastery and overall knowledge of classical ballet expected at the advanced/intermediate level.
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Beginning Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1015-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
FAM 1015-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 7:30-8:50 p.m.)
FAM 1015-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 2-3:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is an introductory course for any non-major wishing to learn the fundamentals of classical ballet technique. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women/ white T-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men) learning the essentials of a traditional classical ballet class. We will study the French terminology associated with the movement and poses we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form including historical perspective, origin and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.
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Ballet Conditioning for Athletes and Dance Team (3 credits)
FAM 1019-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 8-9:20 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is a beginning level ballet course designed especially for athletes and dance team members. As well as focusing on increasing the skill and artistry level within the parameters of classical ballet, the student will also learn to understand the historical perspectives of the art form and the value it has to the culture of society. Within the framework of the traditional ballet class, students will focus on developing strong core muscles, as well as lengthening and toning the body with additional mat work and conditioning exercises, as part of the conditioning program. Daily proper attire is expected for this class. Exercise bands and mat or towel are also required.
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Beginning Modern Dance I (3 credits)
FAM 1025-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

In this course for non-dance majors, students are introduced to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values.
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Dance Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1095-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

This online course introduces dance as a performing art, focusing on the Western European and American dance forms of Ballet, Modern and Contemporary. The course will trace their development, historical development and cultural characteristics. Additional course topics will include viewing live dance performances.
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Hip Hop Dance (1 credits)
FAM 1030-001 (Monday, 5:30-6:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

A beginning/intermediate level dance course with no experience required. This class is designed to teach the fundamentals of Hip-Hop through choreographed dances. Hip-Hop style similar to that seen on current music videos will be the style taught in class. Individual work, floor work and partner work will be emphasized. Combinations will be performed to Rap and R & B music.
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Intermediate Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1017-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is a ballet course designed for dancers with previous ballet training. It is a repeatable course for the non-major wishing to further pursue the complexities and artistic nuances of classical ballet technique. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women/ white T-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men) learning the essentials of a traditional classical ballet class. We will study the French terminology associated with more complex movement and positions we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form including historical perspective, origin and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.
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Intermediate Modern Dance I (3 credits)
FAM 1027-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:05-10 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

A one semester, repeatable (by audition or permission of instructor) course for non-dance majors, providing a more sophisticated approach to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will also continue to explore and further develop fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the cultivation of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool within our society.
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Legends of Dance – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1094-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This course introduces dance legends of Ballet, Modern and Contemporary Dance, their significant contribution to the world of dance in America, as well as the passion and insight that brought the legends to their height of success. Additional course topics include viewing live dance performances.
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Modern Dance Basics – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1022-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

In this course for non-dance majors, students are introduced to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values. Through interactive online instruction students use recording devices (e.g., smartphones, laptops, and camcorders) to develop their dance technique while building a dance community. To complete assignments students may film the dances with friends and/or family in locations of their choosing. (e.g., dorm room, apartment, basement, backyard, park, and riverside). Students may also utilize the 414 Video Production Room in Langsam Library.
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Movie and Media Appreciation Classes

Art of Recording (3 credits)
FAM 1050-001 (Monday, 4:30-7:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy

Art of Recording focuses on the basic technical musical understanding needed to engage music at progressively deeper levels of understanding. Starting from simple listening experiences you will soon be able to appreciate what it means to be an “expert listener.” A musician learns the function musical scales; a painter, the knowledge paint and brushes; a writer, the craft of words and sentences. The expert listener integrates specific gateways that can reveal the depths of sound possibilities. This course expresses the Art of Recording from basic sound physics, music and brain functions as they pertain to the technology used in producing the popular music we love over the last five decades.
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Digital Audio for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2007-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking KI Knowledge Integration

This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of digital audio theory and practices through the development of basic digital audio production projects. Course topics include general production principles and theory of operation of digital audio workstations with an emphasis placed on internet radio, podcast, and commercial production processes. The student will be introduced to basic audio production techniques through the corresponding laboratory phase of this course. The student will be required to demonstrate knowledge of the principles of audio production and apply those principles in laboratory exercises. Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Have taken the following Courses EMDT1011C min grade D-, or EMED1005 min grade D-, or EMED1015 min grade D-.
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Digital Video for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2002-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas:  CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking KI Knowledge Integration

The medium of digital video has become an increasingly pervasive means of communication in contemporary culture. Digital Video allows students to apply media aesthetic theory, processes and techniques in communicating their ideas to a specified audience via the digital video production process. While taking this course, each student is required to write, produce, shoot, and edit several projects using digital video cameras, working in a digital nonlinear editing environment, and delivering their content through a variety of digital distribution channels to a specified audience. Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Have taken the following Courses EMDT1011C min grade D-, or EMED1006 min grade D-, or EMED1016 min grade D-.
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Disney Animated Musicals (3 credits)
FAM 2090-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:50 p.m.; Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.)
FAM 2090-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.; Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course explores the genre of the animated film musical with a special emphasis on its presumed originator, the Walt Disney Studios. We will consider the unique expressive properties of this form, examining the ways in which both song and the animated medium distort, rearrange, and reflect the world for its audiences. As we trace the genre’s history and evolution from the earliest experiments with sound technology to the latest multi-billion-dollar franchises, we will simultaneously track shifting trends in popular song and film. This history will run alongside discussions of Disney’s complex and often problematic roles as a purveyor of American and global entertainment.
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Foundations of Digital Media (3 credits)
DMC 1000-001 (Monday, 2-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Introduces the field of Digital Media and Cinematic Arts, the faculty who teach it and the professionals who practice it. Faculty members will present their research and relate that topic to the wider field of Digital Media and Cinematic Arts. Professionals will present their work and relevant projects. This course encourages students to clarify their course of study and build connections with faculty, professionals and students with similar interests.
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Going to the Movies: 20th Century Classics (3 Credits)
EMED 1075-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Through lectures and screenings of classic films students will explore the evolution of the motion picture as a unique and significant form of expression. The course includes investigation into film style and structure, distribution and consumption. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination.
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Integrated Media Production 1 for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 1015-001 (Online)
EMED 1015-002 (Monday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: TI Technology and Innovation, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy

Media convergence is a vital component of our new media culture. In new media there is a melding of production, design and message with user-experience. Integrated Media Production I is an introductory course — the first of a two-course sequence within the E-Media major at CCM — that provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation in the intersecting worlds of digital media production, content development and new media design. This course is an overview of concepts and processes in convergent media production.
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Jammin’ with Laptops (3 credits)
FAM 2014-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-noon)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration
This course will explore the potentials of laptop computers for music making. Various technical topics, including analog v. digital sound, audio software, effects, gear, MIDI and audio programming languages will be surveyed. In addition, a survey of the history of computer music will be conducted by way of an investigation into seminal readings and recordings. Both of these inquiries will provide participants.
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Jammin’ with Laptops – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, SR Social Responsibility
In this course, you will play, record, and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session; Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2), and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3 In the Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments, and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the Midterm Exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In the Unit 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In the Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1~2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In the Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2~4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the Final Exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.
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Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime, and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music, and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.
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The Evolution of the Television Comedy (3 credits)
EMED 1050-001 (Wednesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HU Humanities and Literature, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Through lectures and screenings of classic scenes and episodes, students will explore the American television comedy as a significant form of storytelling, as a uniquely elastic form of expression and contemporary critique, and as an exceptionally creative and influential art. The course includes investigation into comedy and sitcom style and structure, as well as historical and societal context and impact. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination. This course is focused in the historical and cultural development of television comedies from their pre-TV origins to their contemporary manifestations. Students will develop the strategies for reading media properly while also investigating the historical, literary, cultural and aesthetic contributions of television to 20th and 21st century art forms.
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Music Appreciation Classes

American Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2006-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking
An online history of music in America c. 1620 to the present. Musical life as we experience it in the USA today is the product of a history that is in many ways unique, but never far from world-wide influences. This course surveys a wide variety of music along with the social, political, and religious movements that have shaped American musical life right up to the present. Examines the contributions of numerous cultural groups, regional developments over four centuries, and the ways music reflects values, aspirations, and problems of the population. Course topics include musical genres, styles, personalities, and trends. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, and videos are all online. No prior experience with music required.
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Experimental Rock ‘60s and ‘70s (3 credits)
FAM 2013-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30-2:50 p.m.)
FAM 2013-002 (Online: 8/26-10/15, 1st half semester)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

This course will provide a detailed overview of the tools, techniques and musical styles which had a tremendous impact on the aesthetic of various genres of Rock Music in the 1960s and 70s, the resonance of which can be observed in many mainstream and non-mainstream musical trends of the last 30 years. It will begin with an examination of multi-tracking tape machines: their development and techniques such as sound on sound, tape-delay and flange, which had become standard practice in studios by the late 1960s. This is followed by a technical overview of electronic instruments, specifically the synthesizer, whose development will be traced from the Theremin. Musical trends such as the 1950s avant-garde and Minimalism will serve as a bridge to examinations of seminal bands such as the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Kraftwerk, Can, Neu:, Brian Eno and the Talking Heads among others; the technical knowledge gained from the initial lectures on tape techniques and electronic instruments will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the music of these artists.
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Hamilton: A Musical Theatre Revolution (3 credits)
FAM 2075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, has been credited as revolutionary and a game changer in the history of the American musical since its off-Broadway opening in 2015. This course explores the revolutionary aspect of this musical, covering song and plot conventions of musical theater as they appear in musicals from the 1920s to the present and investigating how Miranda employs, challenges, and transforms them in Hamilton. We will also consider Hamilton among other “history musicals,” its relationship with popular music (especially hip-hop and socio-political issues of race and ethnicity derived from Miranda’s choice to offer a multi-racial cast to represent the Founding Fathers. We will thus contextualize Hamilton in musical theater history and investigate what aspects of the musical are conventional and which ones are original.
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History of Rock ‘n’ Roll – Online (3 Credits)
FAM 3031-001
FAM 3031-002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Rock and Roll had humble beginnings in the Southeastern United States, but over time it developed into a force, beyond mere entertainment, that has defined youth culture on a global scale. Rock and roll culture is embedded in the fabric of youth identity. Rock and roll music is a commodity that young people use daily, often with an obsessive devotion. Marketing campaigns that target youth are so relentless that young people are under enormous media and social pressure to join the ranks of consumers. The goal of History of Rock and Roll is, therefore, threefold: 1. To provide for students a chronological survey that examines the relationship between the music, its most successful and colorful artists, the associated recording technology, and the impact of the genre on American culture. 2. Through critical listening and reading, the course will provide students with useful, evaluative tools so that they can make historically informed and thoughtful decisions about the music they select and enjoy. 3. Finally, the course will encourage students to seek and appreciate new styles, and perhaps inspire those who seek a career as a pop music artist. No prerequisite.
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Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime, and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music, and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.
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Jazz Appreciation (3 credits)
FAM 2051-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
FAM 2051-002 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

A one-semester overview of America’s true art form: jazz. The course will introduce students to the various styles of jazz, its major performers, its history and origins, and will also involve attending jazz performances at CCM or elsewhere.
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Live at CCM (2-3 credits)
FAM 1060-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

Through this course, students will have the opportunity to experience concerts at CCM in a directed environment. Learn about a broad range of music and style through exposure to a wide variety of instrumental ensembles. Attend orchestral, wind ensemble, choral, jazz and contemporary music programs and more with the chance to discuss and write about them through interaction with knowledgeable graduate assistants and the directors of the respective ensembles themselves.
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Music and Politics (3 credits)
FAM 2018-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 11:15-12:35 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration
This course examines the impact of music on politics during the last 100 years in the contemporary classical realm, as well as folk and popular musical styles. Students will become familiar with prominent politically influenced musicians and composers such as Fela Kuti, Woody Guthrie, Bob Marley, and Frederic Rzewski. Also, this class will cover the impact on music from major political and historical events throughout the century, such as World War II’s influence on jazz, or the life and career of Dmitri Shostakovich under Stalin’s Soviet Union. By studying the biographies and major works of this broad spectrum of musicians, students will be able to outline the diverse characteristics of politically oriented music.
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Music Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2005-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and culture, CM Effective Communication

An online course that introduces students to a wide range of music in the Western World, covering several historical periods, including our own time. Examines musical styles, musical terms, composers, and other aspects of the music listening experience. Considers the historical and cultural context of musical activity and the way it has shaped the musical life from medieval Europe up to the present in our own communities. Students will discuss their own experiences with music and have the opportunity to attend a musical performance of their choice, near where they live, for class credit. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, videos, and film are all online. No prior experience with music required.
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Music of the Beatles (3 credits)
FAM 2061-001 (Online)
FAM 2061-002 (Online)
FAM 2061-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

The Music of the Beatles has made an impact in the whole world both musically and sociologically. The Beatles are considered one of the most influential bands of any era. Their music reflects the cultural and social revolution of the 1960s and serves as a model for understanding all subsequent popular music. This class will chronologically trace the development of the Beatles from their early days through the band’s dissolution. There will be analysis of selected compositions with regard to lyrics, harmony, song structure, instrumentation, and arranging. This class will examine their groundbreaking production techniques, individual writing styles, and the impact of their music on other musicians and social trends.
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Music of Woodstock (3 credits)
FAM 2070-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

The course thoroughly examines the musical artists and the works they performed at history’s most iconic pop music festival, Woodstock (officially the “Woodstock Music and Art Fair”). As many as half a million people or more, descending on a dairy farm in upstate New York in August of 1969 for “three days of peace and music,” were treated to a wildly diverse lineup of musicians and artists hailing from no less than five different continents. The Woodstock Festival is the perfect prism through which to view the 1960s popular scene, when various streams of musical genres converged to forge a new breed of “pop”; the soundtrack of the counterculture and a young, idealistic generation. How did a music festival, let alone pop music in general, become a catalyst for social, political, and artistic change and upheaval? How was the motley assortment of musicians of various stripes, genres, genders, and ethnicities received by the crowd, temporarily the fourth-largest city in New York? How did this crowd co-exist and survive without virtually any of the realities that plague a similar-sized urban center? These are just a few of the many questions posed in this course as we study and—equally as important—savor and experience the musical performances of the 1969 Woodstock Festival.
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Talking about Music (3 credits)
FAM 1102-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 3:35-4:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
This course will explore contemporary musical topics through dialogue and reflection. Themed weeks will investigate the intersection of philosophy, aesthetics, and culture as they pertain to the musical experience. Within these three broad concepts, diverse topics (posed as questions) will range from the existential (What is Music?) to the social (Where do you find music?) to the economic (What is a fair way to pay creators for their music?). All are designed to focus and enrich the musical experience, while broadening student awareness of the music industry and endeavoring to answer questions that don’t fit neatly into traditional music course contexts. Students will journal their reflections on these discussions, culminating in a final project, either written or practical.
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Understanding Music for Non-Majors (3 credits)
FAM 1100-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
The appreciation of music is enhanced by a deeper knowledge of musical materials and structures. This introductory course will focus on reading and writing music in treble, bass, and C-clefs; using rhythms as complicated as triplets in simple and compound meters; recognizing intervals and chords; and understanding basic forms used in popular and classical music. The skills learned in this course will provide the basis for further study and understanding of music of all genres.
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What’s Hot in Popular Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2062-001
FAM 2062-002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: DC Diversity and Culture, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

This online course examines current popular music in its trending styles and genres. Students will critique selected songs from the weekly “Billboard” charts and various other media resources, including You Tube and digital download statistics, and consider both the hottest artists as well as promising up-and-comers. Students will develop skills for evaluating artistic intent with respect to lyrics, some basic literary techniques, melody, harmony, rhythm, song form, and psychology, and with a look at cutting edge production techniques. Students will identify and compare unique composing and performing styles of today’s artists and identify links between the music business and societal trends. Weekly activity will include reading, viewing, and listening to examples online and completing assignments on Canopy. No prerequisite. No textbook.
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Women in Music (3 credits)
FAM 2025-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11:15 a.m.-12:10 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

Women in Music is an historical survey of women’s lives and accomplishments in Western music from the medieval period to the present time. The course includes women of diverse races, classes and cultures, and the historical issues that impacted or limited their work. An examination of women’s roles as composers, performers, and patrons reveals their achievements that have been largely ignored because of their gender. Furthermore, although the cultural and societal values change over time and geographic locations, it is evident that suppression and exploitation are recurring themes with regard to social status, education, economics, politics, religion or racial prejudice.
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Music Performance Classes

Classical Guitar Class (2 credits)
GTAR 1075-001 (U)
GTAR 6075-001 (G)
Tuesday/Thursday 12:20-1:15 p.m.
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking
Applied course in basic guitar skills. Emphasis on playing classical and folk styles. Review of current published methods and materials. Open to non-CCM students. Course repeats each semester. Students provide their own nylon string guitars.
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Group Piano I Non-majors (2 credits)
PIAN 1001-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:05-10:00 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-004 (Tuesday/Thursday, 1:25-2:20 p.m.)
PIAN 1001-005 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

Designed for those with little or no piano experience; teaches the fundamentals of reading music, playing by ear, using chord charts, and improving finger flexibility.
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Jammin’ with Laptops (3 credits)
FAM 2014-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-noon)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration
This course will explore the potentials of laptop computers for music making. Various technical topics, including analog v. digital sound, audio software, effects, gear, MIDI and audio programming languages will be surveyed. In addition, a survey of the history of computer music will be conducted by way of an investigation into seminal readings and recordings. Both of these inquiries will provide participants.
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Jammin’ with Laptops – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, SR Social Responsibility
In this course, you will play, record, and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session; Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2), and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3 In the Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments, and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the Midterm Exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In the Unit 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In the Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1~2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In the Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2~4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the Final Exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.
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Piano Lead Sheet Non-majors (3 credits)
PIAN 1003-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11:15-12:10 p.m.)
PIAN 1003-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Students will learn how to play piano parts of popular idiom piano pieces. They will learn how to realize chord “lead” sheets and also listen to music to pick up piano accompaniment styles. Learning to read music is not part of this course, although you will learn to read rhythm charts. Music will be chosen from artists such as Coldplay, Rihanna, Bruno Mars, as well as earlier works by Chicago, Motley Crue and John Lennon. Choices will be made depending on the type of accompaniment style you are learning.
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UC Cabaret Singers (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1082 (Monday/Wednesday, 6-7:30 p.m.)

The UC Cabaret Singers seeks to enrich the university experience by providing quality musical experiences for UC students within the context of performance of a variety of choral idioms. Members of the UC Choruses work towards excellence in musical performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensemble regularly performs on campus, locally, and on national tours.
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UC Men’s Chorus (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1081 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 4-5:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses seek to enrich the university experience by providing students a wide range of aesthetic experiences, introducing them to a variety of musical styles, helping them gain appreciation for tonal sounds, and making connections between music and their own personal lives. Members of the UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses will work toward excellence in performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensembles regularly perform on campus, locally and on annual national tours.
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UC Symphony Orchestra (0-1 credit)
ENSM 2091 (Tuesday, 8-10 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Symphony Orchestra is specifically for and is designed to provide students with an opportunity to rehearse and perform great orchestral repertoire. Membership in the orchestra is open to instrumentalists who own their own instrument, have a basic technical proficiency, and the ability to read music. Specific seating assignments in the orchestra are determined by informal auditions at the start of each quarter.
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UC Women’s Chorus (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1085 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 4-5:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses seek to enrich the university experience by providing students a wide range of aesthetic experiences, introducing them to a variety of musical styles, helping them gain appreciation for tonal sounds, and making connections between music and their own personal lives. Members of the UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses will work toward excellence in performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensembles regularly perform on campus, locally and on annual national tours.
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Voice Class (1-2 credits)
VOIC 1075-001 (Thursday, 2-2:55 p.m.)
VOIC 1075-002 (Tuesday, 4-4:55 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Voice Class is intended to impart the rudiments of classical vocal technique. Topics addressed include breathing for singing, phonation, anatomy of the breathing process, anatomy of the larynx, posture, vowel formation, and characteristics of consonant sounds. The class will culminate in the student performing a song in English.
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Theatre Appreciation Classes

Acting for Non-Majors (3 credits)
FAM 1001-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 1-2:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-002 (Monday/Wednesday, 6-7:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-003 (Monday/Wednesday, 4-5:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-004 (Monday/Wednesday, 2:30-3:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

An introductory course in the craft of acting designed for University students interested in theatre performance. Students will work on unscripted material in group improvisations and scripted material in the presentation of monologues or scenes. Basic actor vocabulary common to all styles of performance will be taught.
_____

Hamilton: A Musical Theatre Revolution (3 credits)
FAM 2075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, has been credited as revolutionary and a game changer in the history of the American musical since its off-Broadway opening in 2015. This course explores the revolutionary aspect of this musical, covering song and plot conventions of musical theater as they appear in musicals from the 1920s to the present and investigating how Miranda employs, challenges, and transforms them in Hamilton. We will also consider Hamilton among other “history musicals,” its relationship with popular music (especially hip-hop and socio-political issues of race and ethnicity derived from Miranda’s choice to offer a multi-racial cast to represent the Founding Fathers. We will thus contextualize Hamilton in musical theater history and investigate what aspects of the musical are conventional and which ones are original.
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Introduction to Arts Administration for Non-Majors (4 credits)
AADM 5160-001 (U)
AADM 6060-001 (G)
Monday/Wednesday, 9:05-10:45 a.m.
This course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of American not-for-profit arts administration/management. The course opens with an introduction to the not-for-profit profit sector. The not-for-profit arts sector is then examined in this context. The second section of the course consists of an overview of the principles and practice of not-for-profit arts administration/management. The topics of mission, governance and leadership, human resources, strategic and financial management and the development of revenue resources to support mission are covered. Through readings, lectures and class discussions, students will apply those principles to the case study of an actual organization and, time permitting, will model the creation of an organizational plan outline for a small not-for-profit performing arts organization.
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Introduction to Stage Lighting and Sound (3 credits)
THPR 1020C-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

In this course, the student will learn hands on skills with lighting and sound equipment, while discovering the ways in which modern technology can be effectively applied as a key production element in drama, musical theatre, opera and dance. Through experiences both practical and theoretical, each student will gain operational skills, and recognize the importance of teamwork and collaboration in creating art and discovering a personal aesthetic.
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Stage Lighting Lab and Crew for Non-Majors (1-2 credits)
THPR 1018C-001 (Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Practical production undergraduate crew work in the execution of stage lighting designs for major opera, musical theatre, dance and dramatic productions. Each student will practice their understanding in accomplishing the execution of a realized lighting design project(s). Non-typical work session hours required (evening and weekends) for installation and running crews for productions. May be repeated for credit.
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Theatre History for Non-Majors (3 credits)
DRPF 2054 001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11:15-12:10 p.m.)
DRPF 2054 002 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives, CT Critical Thinking

History of Theatre is a chronological look at the rise of Western theatre from ancient times to the Renaissance. The course examines how theatre emerges, its dramatic structure, styles of acting, various visual elements, and different production techniques. The course also explores how theatre artisans built upon the experiences of one another, introduces key figures from theatre history and shows how theatre continues to influence us today.
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Registration Information

UC students can register for classes online at https://www.catalyst.uc.edu.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Slideshows: ‘La Clemenza di Tito’

CCM’s brand-new take on Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito (The Clemency of Titus) opens this Friday, April 12, and continues through Sunday, April 14, 2019 in Corbett Auditorium. A dramatic tale of vengeance and forgiveness, CCM’s production is set during the Cuban Revolution in 1959.

View the slideshow below for your sneak peek at the opera. Mozart’s last opera seria, La Clemenza di Tito displays some of his most memorable and marvelous arias. Caught between his duty and his heart, Emperor Tito must choose whether to rule with mercy or with an iron fist after he narrowly avoids an assassination plot.

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La Clemenza di Tito runs April 12-14, 2019 at CCM’s Corbett Auditorium. Tickets on sale now through the CCM Box Office.

CCM’s production of La Clemenza di Tito will last 2 hours and 20 minutes, including a 15-minute intermission.

____________________

LA CLEMENZA DI TITO
Music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Edited for the Neue Mozart-Ausgabe by Franz Giegling
Used by arrangement with European American Music Distributors Company, US and Canadian agent for Baerenreiter-Verlag, publisher and copyright owner

Creative Team

  • Jiannan Cheng, conductor
  • Robin Guarino, director
  • Josh Cook*, assistant director
  • Rachel C. Boylan*, costume designer
  • Oran Wongpandid*, hair and make-up designer
  • Kathleen Kelly, musical preparation
  • Evan P. Carlson*, lighting designer
  • Sidney Martin*, props master
  • Mark Halpin, scenic designer
  • Hankyu Lee*, sound designer
  • Margo Leist*, production stage manager
  • Kathleen Kelly and Marco Nistico, language coaches
  • Ahyoung Jung*, Yang Lin* and Bin Yu*, rehearsal pianists

* CCM Student

Cast List

  • Salvatore Atti+, Carlos Cardenas^ as Tito Vespasian, Roman Emperor
  • Teresa Perrotta^, Jordan Stadvec+ as Vitellia, daughter of Emperor Vitellio
  • Brenda Iglesias^, Karis Tucker+ as Sesto, young patrician in love with Servilia
  • Grace Kiver^, Michelle La Jeunesse+ as Annio, young patrician in love with Servilia
  • Victoria Okafor+, Yewon Yoon^ as Servilia, sister of Sesto in love with Annio
  • Antonio Cruz^, John Siarris+ as Publio, commander of the Praetorian Guard
  • Chorus: Elana Bell, Justin Burgess, Victor Cardamone, Victoria Ellington, Anyeé Farrar, Christina Hazen, Ella Joyner Horn, Georgia Jacobson, Nicholas Kelliher, Jordan Krack, Brittany Logan, Jordan Loyd, Raven McMillon, Tayte Mitchell, Miguel Pedroza Gonzalez, Deborah Rivera, Turner Staton, Lindsay Webber, Ryan Wolfe

^ Friday, April 12 and Sunday, April 14

+ Saturday, April 13

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Friday, April 12
  • 8 p.m. Saturday, April 13
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, April 14

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati 

Purchasing Tickets
Ticket prices start at $32. Discounts are available for UC and non-UC students. Service changes may apply for online orders.

Student rush tickets will be available one hour before each performance to non-UC students, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid Bearcat ID, based on availability.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online through CCM’s e-Box Office.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____________________

Mainstage Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Opera Department Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Rosenthal

Opera Production Sponsor: Genevieve Smith

CCM News CCM Slideshows Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Opera Presents Mozart’s ‘La Clemenza di Tito’

A revolutionary tale of vengeance and forgiveness, this brand-new take on one of Mozart’s final operas displays some of his most memorable and marvelous arias performed by CCM’s stars of tomorrow.

CCM’s Mainstage Series production of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito (The Clemency of Titus) opens on Friday, April 12 and continues through Sunday, April 14, 2019, at CCM’s Corbett Auditorium. Jiannan Cheng conducts the production, with stage direction by Robin Guarino, the J. Ralph Corbett Distinguished Chair in Opera.

CCM’s production of the opera is set during the Cuban Revolution in 1959. The story focuses on Emperor Tito who must choose a wife, but is unable to find a suitable match. In his search for an empress, Tito narrowly avoids an assassination plot instigated by his protégé Sesto and the former emperor’s daughter, Vitellia, who wants the throne for herself. Caught between his duty and his heart, Tito must choose whether to rule with mercy or with an iron fist.

An esteemed director, Guarino’s work has been seen on stages across the country including the Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera, the Glimmerglass Festival and Cincinnati Opera, among others. She recently directed The Coronation of Poppea at the Florentine Opera Company in Milwaukee. A Milwaukee arts critic praised her staging of the opera, writing that “her choices are not just intelligent, but entertaining.”

Experience CCM’s brand-new take on Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito from Friday, April 12 through Sunday, April 14, 2019. Tickets on sale now through the CCM Box Office.

CCM’s production of La Clemenza di Tito will last 2 hours and 20 minutes, including a 15-minute intermission.

­­­____________________

LA CLEMENZA DI TITO
Music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Edited for the Neue Mozart-Ausgabe by Franz Giegling
Used by arrangement with European American Music Distributors Company, US and Canadian agent for Baerenreiter-Verlag, publisher and copyright owner

Creative Team

  • Jiannan Cheng, conductor
  • Robin Guarino, director
  • Josh Cook*, assistant director
  • Rachel C. Boylan*, costume designer
  • Oran Wongpandid*, hair and make-up designer
  • Kathleen Kelly, musical preparation
  • Evan P. Carlson*, lighting designer
  • Sidney Martin*, props master
  • Mark Halpin, scenic designer
  • Hankyu Lee*, sound designer
  • Margo Leist*, production stage manager
  • Kathleen Kelly and Marco Nistico, language coaches
  • Ahyoung Jung*, Yang Lin* and Bin Yu*, rehearsal pianists

* CCM Student

Cast List

  • Salvatore Atti+, Carlos Cardenas^ as Tito Vespasian, Roman Emperor
  • Teresa Perrotta^, Jordan Stadvec+ as Vitellia, daughter of Emperor Vitellio
  • Brenda Iglesias^, Karis Tucker+ as Sesto, young patrician in love with Servilia
  • Grace Kiver^, Michelle La Jeunesse+ as Annio, young patrician in love with Servilia
  • Victoria Okafor+, Yewon Yoon^ as Servilia, sister of Sesto in love with Annio
  • Antonio Cruz^, John Siarris+ as Publio, commander of the Praetorian Guard
  • Chorus: Elana Bell, Justin Burgess, Victor Cardamone, Victoria Ellington, Anyeé Farrar, Christina Hazen, Ella Joyner Horn, Georgia Jacobson, Nicholas Kelliher, Jordan Krack, Brittany Logan, Jordan Loyd, Raven McMillon, Tayte Mitchell, Miguel Pedroza Gonzalez, Deborah Rivera, Turner Staton, Lindsay Webber, Ryan Wolfe

^ Friday, April 12 and Sunday, April 14

+ Saturday, April 13

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Friday, April 12
  • 8 p.m. Saturday, April 13
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, April 14

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati 

Purchasing Tickets
Ticket prices start at $32. Discounts are available for UC and non-UC students. Service changes may apply for online orders.

Student rush tickets will be available one hour before each performance to non-UC students, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid Bearcat ID, based on availability.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online through CCM’s e-Box Office.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
____________________

Mainstage Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Opera Department Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Rosenthal

Opera Production Sponsor: Genevieve Smith

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Studio Musical Theatre Series Presents ‘Yeast Nation’

CCM’s 2018-19 Studio Series continues with Yeast Nationa musical comedy by Tony Award-winning Urinetown creators Mark Hollmann and Greg Kotis. Directed and choreographed by Vince DeGeorge with musical direction by Henry Lewers, the musical runs Thursday, April 4, through Saturday, April 6, 2019, at CCM’s Cohen Family Studio Theater.

Yeast Nation is an epic tale of evolution and revolution set in 3,000,458,000 B.C. at the bottom of the primordial sea. The musical centers on a society of salt-eating Yeast, the world’s very first life form. “As we are thrown into the deep end of this most epic of underwater tales, we discover a kingdom in turmoil, whose inhabitants long for the comfort of stasis all the while grappling with a new, hitherto-unknown, force of nature that will change their lives forever: love,” DeGeorge says.

The music is a hybrid of pop, rock and musical theatre with a definite groovy ’70s vibe, DeGeorge adds. He has been in contact with Hollmann and Kotis for the past year as CCM prepared for its production of Yeast Nation. During CCM’s rehearsal process there were changes to the script and score — both Hollmann and Kotis are dedicated theater artists who are very interested in the continued development of the musical, DeGeorge says. Hollmann and Kotis are coming to CCM on April 5 to see the show and to talk with musical theatre students about the production.

“This entire process has been a wonderful labor of love,” DeGeorge says. “Greg Kotis and Mark Hollman have been incredibly generous with their time and talents. The student designers, technicians, stage managers and performers have all risen to the challenges presented by this unique piece of ‘bio-historical musical theatre.’ ”

“The cast, stage management team and I have had a blast in the rehearsal room as we dive into the ridiculousness of the musical and discover its depth,” he adds. “This piece is a weird and wonderful combination of absurdity and pathos — like nothing I have ever worked on before.”

Admission to CCM’s production of Yeast Nation is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, April 1. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.
____________________

Yeast Nation
Music by Mark Hollmann
Lyrics by Mark Hollmann and Greg Kotis
Book by Greg Kotis

Cast List

  • Anya Axel as Jan-the-Unnamed
  • Eli Goykhman as Jan-the-Elder
  • Erich Schleck as Jan-the-Wise
  • John Collins as Jan-the-Second-Oldest
  • Bailee Endebrock as Jan-the-Sweet
  • Delaney Guyer as Jan-the-Sly
  • Jamie Goodson as Jan-the-Famished
  • Kurtis Brown as Jan-the-Wretched
  • Elijah King as Jan-the-Youngest
  • Veronica Stern as The New One
  • The Yeast: Olivia Buss, Nick Berninger, Carlee Coulehan, David Littlefield, Haley Holcomb, Quinn Surdez, Victoria Popritkin, Jake Waford, Jordyn Walker

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Thursday, April 4
  • 8 p.m. Friday, April 5
  • 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, April 6

Location
Cohen Family Studio Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati 

Admission
Admission is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, April 1. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two per order.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Acting Presents Annual Senior Showcase on March 29

Enjoy the talents of the CCM Acting Class of 2019 in its exciting senior showcase in Cincinnati prior to its professional debut in New York and Los Angeles.

Graduating students from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music’s Acting program present the annual Senior Showcase at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. this Friday, March 29, 2019, in CCM’s Robert J. Werner Recital Hall.

CCM Acting’s Class of 2019 will also present the showcase at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. on April 2, 2019, at New York’s Griffin Theatre at the Pershing Square Signature Center. The showcase will also be performed at 1 p.m., 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. on April 16, 2019 at Los Angeles’ Garry Marshall Theatre.

The showcase performance features a variety of scenes by CCM Acting’s Class of 2019, demonstrating the depth and breadth of the acting skills they have honed during their undergraduate training at CCM.

The evening performance in Cincinnati will be followed by the annual DOLLY awards recognizing excellence by students in CCM Acting, as well as a reception in the CCM Baur Room. Event details are below.

Meet CCM Acting’s Class of 2019

Jacqueline Daaleman is a graduate of the BFA Acting program at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). Born and raised in northern New Jersey, no, she still does not know how to pump gas. At CCM, she played Phoebe in Gracie Gardner’s world premiere of Very Dumb Kids, Voltaire in Candide with CCM Opera and Dabby Bryant in Our Country’s Good. Other favorite credits include: Launce in The Two Gentleman of Verona with RADA (London, UK), Linda in Charlie’s Girls at the Boulder Fringe Festival and Pearl Bryan in Pearl Bryan with InBocca Performance (KY). Film credits and voice over credits include: “Poetry Girl” (Amazon), “CRAIG” and “A Model Friendship”. In addition to theatre, Jacqueline loves to sing, make people laugh, travel around the world and foster puppies. Learn more at jacquelinedaaleman.com.


Gabriella DiVincenzo is a Massachusetts native and is filled with joy to be graduating with a BFA in Acting from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). She was seen on the CCM stage in Hamlet as Horatio and The Government Inspector as Anna Andreyevna. She made her professional debut at the Know Theatre of Cincinnati as Amanda in Darkest Night at the Gnarly Stump. Her favorite film experience in was “You’ve Met Your Match when she played a feisty femme fatale. She is wildly passionate about theatre and has worked as a director/producer on many of her own projects, including LUNGS and Men on Boats at the Liberty Exhibition Hall in Cincinnati. Gabriella is also an accomplished voice over artist. Learn more at gabrielladivincenzo.com.


Sarah Durham is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) with a BFA in Acting, and minor in Directing and Filmmaking. She has acted in many film festival winning shorts, and acts, writes, directs and produces for film and theatre. She is certified in Rapier and Dagger, Single Sword, Broadsword and Recommended in Unarmed Combat by the SAFD. Some of her favorite roles include Men on Boats (William Dunn), Di and Viv and Rose (Diane), and Shakespeare’s Fine Wit (Hermia). When she’s not busy with theatre and film, she loves running ultra-marathons, painting, reading comic books, playing tennis and basketball, paddle-boarding, kayaking and cuddling her adorable cat, Robin (named after Batman’s Tim Drake). Learn more at sarahdurhamactor.com.


James Egbert earned his BFA in Acting from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). Originally from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, James has always enjoyed Shakespeare and the classics. Some of his favorite roles on stage include the Lead in the one man show Every Brilliant Thing, Friar Lawrence in Romeo and Juliet and the Father in Sarah Ruhl’s Eurydice. Some of his favorite film credits include his hero in the award winning Casper (produced by HighSock Productions), and his comedic relief in the horror film House of Hell (Directed by Jacob Berry). He is accomplished in Stage Combat, and specializes in Rapier and Dagger, Unarmed, Single Sword and Broadsword. In addition to acting, James loves playing chess, writing and all things Star Wars. Learn more at jamesfrancisegbert.com.


Ella Eggold is a young artist who is passionate about using theater as a way to bring light and connection to places that do not have enough of either. Ella has earned a BFA in Acting from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) and is also a classically trained vocalist. Favorite credits include Helena in A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Purdue University), Gertrude in Hamlet (CCM), Lanie in God’s Ear (Purdue University), Rose in Di and Viv and Rose (Whoville Theater) and Bottom in Shakespeare’s Fine Wit (CCM). Although the majority of Ella’s training has been in acting, she has experience in producing, stage managing, set design/set building and lighting. When Ella is not doing theater, she enjoys making (and eating) ice cream, reading books and watching movies. Learn more at ellaeggold.com.


Carter LaCava is an actor, writer, producer and painter with a BFA in acting from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory (CCM). Some of his favorite credits from CCM include: The Ghost/Gravedigger in Hamlet, Ivan Alexandrovich Hlestakov in The Government Inspector and Robert Sideway in Our Country’s Good. Some credits outside CCM include: Notwet in the New Stroke Ensemble’s Twothousandelever, Even in The Aliens at Rohs Street Café, and he performed in a reinterpretation of John Cage’s Theatre Piece No. 1 with the SITI company in Saratoga Springs, NY. In 2017 he trained at Skidmore College for the month-long SITI summer theatre workshop, and has since continued his individual physical theatre practice. He is also an actor-combatant with the SAFD, with a certificate in Rapier and Dagger and in Unarmed. Outside of the theater he enjoys long walks in the local park, playing RuneScape and painting. Learn more at carterlacava.com.


Madeleine Page-Schmit is thrilled to have earned her BFA in Acting from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). Her favorite CCM credits include: Our Country’s Good (Mary Brenham), Di and Viv and Rose (Viv), Con Amore: A Romeo and Juliet Selection (Juliet) and Eurydice (Little Stone). Madeleine wrote, produced and performed an original one-woman show, Casquette Girl, which premiered at the Clifton Performance Theatre in Cincinnati. Casquette Girl is based on the life of her 18th century French ancestor and is charged with forgotten history and themes of female disempowerment and immigrant resilience. Madeleine has studied global health and Buddhism in Thailand, visited the Chinese village where her grandmother was raised, lived with a host family in rural Senegal and written and performed at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. She is passionate about building relationships cross-culturally, and also about cheese. A Denver native, Madeleine adores spending time in the mountains hiking and rock climbing. Learn more at madeleinepageschmit.com.


R. Graham Rogers is an actor, writer, director and producer who recently earned his BFA in Acting from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). Some of Graham’s CCM highlights include: The Mayor in The Government Inspector, Various Men (eight!) in the world premiere of The Earth is Flat and Landscaper/Attendant/Man on Date in Middletown by Will Eno. Graham’s film highlights include: the Joker in You’ve Met Your Match, a Batman gay fanfic; College Boys and HighSock Productions’ The Update. Graham loves being a part of and creating new works. He’s been a part of at least eight theatrical world premieres to date, plus more than 20 student films, thanks, in large part, to three years as co-Artistic Director of a small production company he and his roommate ran while in school. In addition to art Graham enjoys meditation and dad jokes. Nothing else! If you haven’t heard Graham laugh, you’re missing out. Learn more at rgrahamrogers.com.


New York Acting Showcase

Students from CCM and Otterbein University present their showcases to industry professionals. Visit ohioactorshowcase.com to reserve seats.

Performance Times
1 p.m. and 3 p.m., Tuesday, April 2

Location
The Alice Griffin Jewel Box theatre at the Pershing Square Signature Center
480 West 42nd Street, New York, New York 10036

Los Angeles Acting Showcase

Students from CCM and Missouri State University present their showcases to industry professionals. Visit theatreanddance.missouristate.edu/showcases/LA.htm to reserve seats.

Performance Times
1 p.m., 4 p.m. and 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 16

Location
Garry Marshall Theatre
4252 Riverside Drive, Los Angeles, California 91505

Cincinnati Acting Showcase

Performance Times
2 p.m. and 7 p.m., Friday, March 29

Location
Robert J. Werner Recital Hall, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Admission to the CCM Acting Senior Showcase on March 29 is FREE; reservations are not required.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Announces 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition Winners

Artist Diploma candidate Yi Li with Mark Gibson and the CCM Philharmonia.

Six students won awards in CCM’s 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition, which was held on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Corbett Auditorium.

Since its inauguration in 1976, the annual competition welcomes current and incoming CCM voice students to compete for scholarships and cash prizes, and a panel of judges composed of opera industry professionals selects each year’s class of prizewinners.

The 2019 CCM Opera Scholarship Competition winners are:

Victor Cardamone, first-year Master of Music student
From Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Studying at CCM with Tom Baresel
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Corbett Award ($15,000)
The Corbett Award is supported by the Corbett Foundation in cooperation with CCM.

Carlos Cardenas, first-year Artist Diploma student
From Bogota, Columbia; Studying at CCM with Daniel Weeks
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Italo Tajo Memorial Award ($15,000)
This award is supported by the Italo Tajo Memorial Scholarship Fund (established by Mr. Tajo’s wife Inelda Tajo) in cooperation with CCM.

Samuel Kid, incoming Master of Music student from the University of Michigan
From Ann Arbor, Michigan
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Andrew White Memorial Award ($12,500)
This award is supported by the Andrew White Memorial Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Teresa Perrotta, second-year Master of Music student
From Orlando, Florida; Studying at CCM with Gwen Detwiler
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Seybold-Russell Award ($10,000)
This award is supported by the Seybold-Russell Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Amanda Olea, second-year Master of Music student
From Mexico City, Mexico; Studying at CCM with Gwen Detwiler
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the John Alexander Memorial Award ($10,000)
This award is supported by the John Alexander Memorial Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Maria Miller, first-year Master of Music student
From Paducah, Kentucky; Studying at CCM with Amy Johnson
Prize: Norman Treigle Award ($3000)
This award is supported by the Norman Treigle Opera Scholarship Competition Award Fund in cooperation with CCM.

The judges panel for CCM’s 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition included:

  • Thomas Bankston, Artistic Director of Dayton Opera
  • Lawrence Edelson, Founder and Producing Artistic Director of American Lyric Theater in New York, where he oversees the Composer Librettist Development Program.
  • Neal Goren, Founder and Artistic Director of Catapult Opera, a new touring company premiering in fall 2020 with a new Robert Wilson production of Menotti’s Amahl and the Night Visitors.

About CCM Opera
The Department of Opera at CCM boasts one of the most comprehensive training programs for opera singers, coaches and directors in the United States. Students at CCM work with some of the most renowned teachers and artists active in opera today.

CCM students and alumni frequently advance to the final rounds of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. In 2017, four CCM alumni competed in the semi-finals: Jessica Faselt, soprano (MM Voice, 2016); Summer Hassan, soprano (MM Voice, 2014); Andrew Manea, baritone (MM Voice, 2016); and Cody Quattlebaum, bass-baritone (BM Voice, 2015) — who was chosen as a finalist in the national competition. In 2018, former CCM Artist Diploma in Opera Performance student Brandon Scott Russell (MM Voice, 2018; AD Vocal Performance, 2018) took first place at the Met’s National Council Auditions Southeast Regional Competition and went on to compete in the semi-final round. This year, three CCM alumni and students will advance to the Met’s National Council Semi-Finals: Joshua Wheeker, tenor (CCM Voice 2007-2012); Murrella Parton (MM Voice, 2017); and Elena Villalón, soprano, currently studying at CCM with William McGraw. The semi-finals take place in New York on March 24, 2019. Learn more at metopera.org/about/auditions/national-council-auditions/.

In addition, CCM’s Mainstage Opera and Studio Opera Series have received some of the National Opera Association Production Competition’s highest honors throughout the years, taking home six of the 18 non-professional prizes awarded in 2010 and four prizes in 2011.

CCM Opera graduates have performed on the stages of the world’s greatest opera companies, including Cincinnati Opera, Metropolitan Opera (New York), Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Royal Opera (London), La Scala (Italy) and more.

CCM’s 2018-19 Mainstage Opera season concludes with W.A. Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito (The Clemency of Titus), conducted by Jiannan Cheng with stage direction by Robin Guarino. The opera runs April 12-14, 2019 at CCM’s Corbett Auditorium. Learn more about the production at uc.edu/news/articles/2018/09/n201495.html

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Register now for CCM Prep Summer Arts Experiences for Youth, Teens and Adults

Arts enthusiasts of all ages and abilities are invited to register now for summer 2019 music, dance and theatre arts programs offered through CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement.

CCM Prep provides enjoyable and accessible arts opportunities within a highly creative environment that educate and inspire the whole student. Courses are taught by CCM Prep and collegiate faculty members and guest artists.

Summer programs include “Animal Crackers” or “Join the Circus” theatre arts and music workshops for young performers in preschool and elementary school. Middle and high school students can start summer on a high note by joining the “Summer Band Experience,” hone their skills in dance classes or become a “triple threat” musical theatre star at “Camp Bravo.”

Adults can also enjoy summer arts experiences in the New Horizons Orchestra or by participating in CCM Prep’s first intergenerational residential camp. “CCM Grand” is open to students and their grandparents who want to share and make new memories while experiencing dorm life at UC’s Marian Spencer Hall.

For more information, view the complete course offerings listed by age group below. Register for courses and view CCM Prep’s summer 2019 course offerings in the links below and at https://register.asapconnected.com/default.aspx?org=1185.

Please contact CCM Prep at 513-556-2595 or ccmprep@uc.edu for more information.

Preschool and Elementary | Ages 3-12

Animal Crackers | Ages 3-6
9 a.m.-noon July 8-12, 2019
Tuition: $160
Amy Dennison, instructor

Stories about the circus inspire creative play, songs, movements and games for our youngest performers. Circus skills like juggling and walking on stilts are adapted for this age!
Register online.

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Join the Circus! | Ages 7-9
9 a.m.-3 p.m. July 15-19, 2019
Tuition: $315
Amy Dennison, instructor

Whether you join the circus or act on the stage, acting, singing, dancing and drumming are waiting for you at this jam-packed week of circus fun! At the end of the week, dazzle your family with a performance showcasing your new skills.
Register online.

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Suzuki Strings Summer Camp | Grades K-6
9 a.m.-4 p.m. July 29-August 2, 2019
Tuition: $260
Joyce Chan Grabell, instructor

Practice your instrument, gain new friends and have fun learning and reviewing skills and songs while improving your technique! CCM Preparatory faculty are planning a full week of classes, rehearsals, enrichment and games for Suzuki string students from pre-twinkle through Book 4 (students will be placed in age appropriate groups). Previous Suzuki experience is required.
Register online.
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Elementary and Middle School | Ages 9-14

Summer Band Experience | Grades 6-8
9 a.m.-noon June 3-7, 2019
Tuition: $160
Rick Canter, instructor

Start your summer on a high note by playing in our band! Spend each day learning new music, through band and small group instruction and developing your musical skills while practicing in a great environment! The band will be featured in concert at the end of the week. Open to all woodwind, brass and percussion players who have completed fifth through eighth grade and have been playing their instrument for at least one year.  
Register online.
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Camp Bravo at CCM | Ages 9-14
9 a.m.-4 p.m. June 3-7, 2019; 9 a.m.-noon June 8
Tuition: $315
Becky Childs, instructor

Prepare to wow family and friends at the end of this popular musical theatre camp. Learn valuable stage skills, tips and repertoire by our seasoned faculty while preparing for an exciting performance starring you! The camp culminates with a performance at 10 a.m. on June 8! No audition for entrance; audition for parts will happen at the beginning of the week. Please note: this camp is designed for students with previous experience and training in musical theatre.  
Register online.

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Camp Bravo at St. Thomas | Ages 9-14
9 p.m.-4 p.m. June 10-14, 2019
Tuition: $315
Karie-Lee Sutherland, instructor

Prepare yourself for applause, cheers and rave reviews with our musical theatre camp. Begin your journey to becoming a triple threat with acting, dance and voice classes taught by the professional teaching artists of the CCM Preparatory faculty. Take a bow at the concluding performance! Please note: this camp is designed for students with little experience or are new to musical theatre.
Register online.
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Middle and High School

Drop-In or Punch Card Ballet Classes
For students in levels 5 through adult
June 3-August 3, 2019
6:15-7:45 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays
11 a.m.-noon on Saturdays

Current CCM Preparatory students in these levels do not need to audition. New students should contact Jonnie Lynn Jacobs-Percer at 513-556-3214 or by e-mail at jacobsji@uc.edu for further information. Punch cards may be purchased at CCM for $60 for 6 classes. Summer ballet punch card classes, typically $17 each, are subsidized by the support of a generous donor. There will not be classes the week of July 1-6.
Register online.

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Back to Ballet Bootcamp
For intermediate and advanced students in levels 5-7
5:15-6:45 p.m. August 26-29, 2019
Tuition: $120

CCM Preparatory’s Back to Ballet Bootcamp is designed for dancers currently in levels 5-7 and offers comprehensive training for young men and women in ballet technique in our state-of-the-art facility.
Register online.
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Looking for more high school summer arts offerings? Students can also study piano, jazz, ballet, musical theatre and more in CCM Prep’s High School Arts Immersion programs. Learn more.

Intergenerational and Adult

New Horizons Orchestra and Chamber Music | Ages 50 and up
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. July 8, 10, 12, 15, 17 and 19
Tuition: $130

Betty Anne Gottlieb, instructor
Join us for two weeks of music making in July. Open to amateur adult string players at any level, we meet in the mornings 3 days each week for sectionals, large ensemble rehearsals and special topic sessions. The two weeks culminate in an informal performance. For those interested in additional music making, chamber music may be offered in the afternoon for an additional fee.
Register online.

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CCM Grand | Ages 8-13 and their grandparents
July 24-26, 2019
Tuition: $350 per person (with dorm) or $300 per person (without dorm)
Amy Dennison, instructor

Remember, share and make new memories here at CCM this summer at CCM Grand, our first intergenerational summer program. Grandparents along with their grandchildren ages 8-13 are invited to our first residential camp of this kind. Families will actively participate in courses taught by preparatory and college faculty that will inspire all ages and create memories for a lifetime! Experience dorm life circa 2019, and see CCM and UC with new eyes. We ask that an existing or previous relationship with CCM (college or preparatory) be established within the family. The dorm for this experience is Marian Spencer Hall.
Earlybird discount: $325 per person. Lock in this rate by registering before March 15!
Register online.
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Looking for more summer arts opportunities for collegiate students and adults? Study instrumental music, playwriting, opera, music education and more in CCM’s Summer Programs. Learn more.

Registration

Register and find more details for each program in the registration links included in the listings above.

You can also register and find more information online. Find courses in the “A to Z” index or in the “Summer for All Ages” links included in the menu on the left on CCM Prep’s online registration website.

Questions?

For more information, please contact CCM Prep at 513-556-2595 or ccmprep@uc.edu.

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"The Hunchback of Notre Dame" runs March 8-10, 2019 at CCM's Corbett Auditorium.

CCM Slideshows: ‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame’

Come one, come all! CCM is getting “topsy turvy” in its Mainstage production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, which continues tonight, March 8, and runs through Sunday, March 10, 2019, in Corbett Auditorium.

View the slideshow below for your sneak peek at CCM’s lush retelling of the musical. Based on the Victor Hugo novel and songs from the Disney animated feature, The Hunchback of Notre Dame features the film’s Academy Award-nominated score, as well as new songs by Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz. Peter Parnell’s book features verbatim passages from Hugo’s gothic novel. Parental discretion is advised.

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Don’t miss your opportunity to see CCM’s stars in the college’s epic production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame on March 8-10, 2019. Tickets on sale now through the CCM Box Office.

CCM’s production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame will last 2 hours and 45 minutes, including a 15-minute intermission.

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THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME
Music by Alan Menken
Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz
Book by Peter Parnell
Based on the Victor Hugo novel and songs from the Disney film
Originally developed by Disney Theatrical Productions

Creative Team

  • Aubrey Berg, director
  • Stephen Goers, musical director
  • Katie Johannigman, choreographer
  • Erin Magner*, production stage manager
  • Dean Mogle, costume designer
  • Oliver Tidwell-Littleton*, lighting designer
  • Matthew Tibbs, sound designer
  • Aria Braswell*, assistant director
  • Kelly Yurko, hair and make-up designer
  • Lindsey Purvis*, scenic designer
  • Hankyu Lee*, associate sound designer
  • Jenny Jones, fight choreographer

* CCM Student

Cast List

  • Andrew Alstat asLieutenant Frederic Charlus
  • Bryce Baxter as Claude Frollo
  • Jack Brewer as Father Dupin
  • Kevin Chlapecka as Clopin Trouillefou
  • Matt Copley as Jehan Frollo
  • Dylan Dougal as Saint Aphrodisius
  • Madison Hagler as King Louis Xi
  • Kendall McCarthy as Florika
  • Jenny Mollet as Esmeralda
  • Sam Pickart as Tribunal
  • Alex Stone as Quasimodo
  • Frankie Thams as Captain Phoebus de Martin
  • Madelaine Vandenberg as Madam
  • Jordan Alexander, Michael Canu, Madison Deadman, Sofie Flores, Kylie Goldstein, Zoe Grolnick, Chip Hawver, Joshua Johnson, Camila Paquet, Bryn Purvis, Mikayla Renfrow, Aaron Richert, Hank Von Kolnitz, Ethan Zeph as Multiple Roles
  • Leo Carmody, Samuel Cohen, Britta Cowan, Christian Feliciano, Carina Florio, Ashton Francis, Colton Harksen, Kai Horvit, Jack Johnson, Christian Kidd, Anna Chase Lanier, Tyler J. Martin, Cassandra Lyn Maurer, Drew Minard, Chesney Mitchell, Stone Mountain, Eli Owens, Ben Pimental, Brandon Schumacker, Matthew Skrovan, Eleanor Zambarano as The Voices of Notre Dame
  • Dance Captains: Joshua Johnson, Bryn Purvis
  • Vocal Warm-Ups: Ben Pimental

Understudies:

  • Quasimodo – Aaron Richert
  • Esmeralda – Camila Paquet
  • Male Cover – Ben Pimental
  • Swings – Tori Heinlein, Sammy Schechter

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Thursday, March 7
  • 8 p.m. Friday, March 8
  • 2 p.m. Saturday, March 9
  • 8 p.m. Saturday, March 9
  • 2 p.m. Sunday, March 10

Location
Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Purchasing Tickets
Ticket prices start at $32. Discounts are available for UC and non-UC students. Service changes may apply for online orders.

Student rush tickets will be available one hour before each performance to non-UC students, based on availability. UC students can receive one free student rush ticket with a valid Bearcat ID, based on availability.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online through CCM’s e-Box Office.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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Mainstage Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Musical Theatre Production Sponsor: Dr. & Mrs. Carl G. Fischer

Musical Theatre Performance Sponsor: Graeter’s Ice Cream

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI, 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Tel: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

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Header image for LINKS program.

CCM Holds Lonely Instruments for Needy Kids (LINKS) Collection Drive This Weekend

Do you have a musical instrument collecting dust? Your gift could provide the missing link for a promising young musician! Through the Lonely Instruments for Needy Kids (LINKS) program at CCM, you can donate your used instrument to a promising young musician who cannot afford to rent or purchase their own.

CCM holds its annual LINKS Collection Days this Saturday, March 9, and Sunday, March 10, 2019, at the Joseph-Beth Booksellers in the Rookwood Pavilion. The hours for the collection drive are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday and noon-5 p.m. on Sunday.

A project of CCMpower in partnership with Buddy Roger’s Music, Joseph-Beth Booksellers and WGUC 90.9 FM, LINKS began in 1993 as the brainchild of CCM alumnus Bill Harvey (BM Music Education, 1971). The Vice President of Buddy Roger’s Music, Harvey wanted to fill the need for students whose parents were unable to buy, rent or borrow an instrument. The solution was somewhat simple: a “recycling program” for musical instruments.

LINKS accepts donations of new and used instruments from the Greater Cincinnati community, then places them with students in local elementary, middle and high school bands and orchestras, as well as with students in CCM Preparatory and Community Engagement programs. Students are qualified by the recommendation of their music teacher, and a LINKS scholarship application is submitted in the student’s name.

Since its inception, LINKS has placed over 3,000 instruments into the hands of children. Even if the instrument is not in perfect condition, donations are gladly accepted. Buddy Roger’s Music generously contributes the time to carefully clean, restore and tune each instrument.

Entertainment during the collection will be provided by local music students of all ages.

If you do not have an instrument, you can still assist young musicians who need a helping hand by making a contribution to the LINKS fund at ccm.weshareonline.org/LINKS.

In addition to the March 9 and 10 collection days, instruments are accepted year-round at Buddy Roger’s Music. Call 513-729-1950 for information on store hours and locations.

For more information on LINKS or to make a monetary donation, call the CCM External Relations Office at 513-556-2100.

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Story by CCM Graduate Student Jonathan Dellinger

 

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