CCM Music Education students perform in the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris during a study abroad trip.

Summer Throwback: Music Education Students Study Abroad in Europe

As part of the first music education study abroad trip, a group of 20 adventurous CCM students traveled to Europe to study in the countries where Western art music was born last summer.

Associate Professor of Music Education Eva Floyd hopes to organize a second study abroad trip in spring 2018. The first trip led the students to Budapest, Vienna, Salzburg and Paris on the 12-day adventure to deepen their appreciation and understanding of music. Students participated in master classes, performed in historic venues, attended concerts and visited cities in which some of classical music’s greatest composers lived and worked.

“When you see the places where Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven were born, lived or worked, it makes the music seem more human,” Floyd said, adding that half of the students had previously never travelled internationally.

Supported by grants from UC International and the Tangeman Sacred Music Center, this was the first study abroad trip for a CCM music education class, according to Floyd.

Traveling to the cities in which these great composers created masterpieces gave new life to their art and added personal dimension to music beyond what can be taught in a classroom.

Similar to learning a foreign language, music literacy is strengthened through studies as well as experience. The act of engaging with a culture first hand is a crucial step towards fluency. Likewise, studying and experiencing music in the countries of its origin encourages a broader understanding of music and music education.

Program participant Taylor Limbert, a junior in vocal music education, reflected on his experience with the program:

“Actually talking with and learning from and performing for people from other cultures was so enriching and I’m so glad I had that opportunity. I had been to Europe before last summer’s trip but this trip was by far the most important in my personal journey as an educator and a person.”

Students in front of Esterhazy Palace in Austria, home one of Haydn’s most important patrons.

Students in front of Esterhazy Palace in Austria, home one of Haydn’s most important patrons.

Students observed music classes of a variety of grades and levels and participated in workshops at the Kodaly Institute in Hungary and the Orff Institute in Salzburg. They had previously studied the famous “Kodaly approach” to music education“seeing it in person made them realize the full potential of music education,” Floyd said.

As part of the program students were able to walk in the figurative footsteps of classical giants. They visited Esterhazy Palace in Eisenstadt, Austria — home to one of Haydn’s most important patrons. Students also toured Liszt’s and Kodaly’s residences in Budapest, Beethoven’s and Haydn’s residences in Vienna and Mozart’s birth home and family residence in Salzburg. Participants also heard concerts while traveling through these historic cities, including the famous Vienna Boys Choir.

Not only did the students visit cultural landmarks, they also had the opportunity to perform in some of the most historically significant and recognizable venues such as the Kodaly Institute in Hungary, St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, Mondsee Cathedral outside Salzburg and Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

“It is a privilege to see and walk through historic cathedrals,” Floyd said. “To make music in such a space allows you to take a piece of it home in your heart.”

Floyd prepared the group’s choral repertoire and organized a choral conducting master class with Peter Erdei, professor at the Liszt Academy and Kodaly Institute, for both CCM and Kodaly Institute students.

“The interchange between students from all corners of the globe was very exciting and proved to be a rich experience for all,” said Floyd, who studied in Hungary for two years before joining CCM faculty.

“The experience is so much more than just learning content and traveling. It helps you learn about yourself. It is very beneficial to get out of your comfort zone, and to be an outsider with language and culture. This helps you empathize with others and find confidence within yourself.”

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Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

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Janelle Gelfand’s 10 picks to see this Fall at CCM

The arts and e-media school — College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati — offers an embarrassment of riches (the most performances in the state, I’m told) and much of it is free. The season starts Aug. 29. See the whole digital calendar here. (My list is just the tip of the iceberg.)…

via My 10 picks to see this Fall at CCM — janellesnotes

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La Boheme, Wolf Trap Opera Company

Arts Administration Students Reflect on Summer Internships

CCM is partnered with the University of Cincinnati’s nationally ranked Lindner College of Business in one of the few MA/MBA graduate Arts Administration programs in the country. We train future CEOs and senior managers of nonprofit arts institutions by giving our students real world experience at local and national arts organizations.

In the past six years, 100% of arts administration graduates have found jobs in their field. Many go on to leadership positions in small and large organizations, while others launch their own nonprofits. In the summer between the first and second year, students work full time at summer internships in organizations all over the country. Below, you can read reflections from two students who interned over the summer at the Aspen Music Festival in Colorado and Wolf Trap Opera in Virginia.

Claire Jagla | CCM 2nd-year Graduate Student in Arts Administration
Internship: Assistant Program Administrator at Aspen Music Festival and School

Arts Administration student Claire Jagla interned at the Aspend Music Festival and School this summer. Photo provided.

Arts Administration student Claire Jagla interned at the Aspen Music Festival and School this summer. Photo provided.

This summer, I served as the Assistant Program Administrator at the Aspen Opera Center in Aspen, Colorado. My responsibilities included scheduling opera rehearsals and then communicating the schedule and any changes to students and faculty. This sometimes involved coordinating 100 people in 200 to 300 events a week but I felt prepared for the task because of my first-year experience at CCM. I arrived in Aspen ready to put what I had learned into practice.

My job felt like working on the spoke of a wheel: though I could not always see the hub of the wheel while scheduling, every spoke needed to be strong in order for the program to roll. While the faculty and students appreciated sound scheduling, the true reward of the summer was watching the wheel finally spin as students embraced opportunities to perform. Attending an Aspen Opera Center production of La bohème was one of these wheel spinning moments. I had seen the opera before, but this production was particularly vibrant because of the student cast. Singers played characters their own ages, which is not common in opera. Their ages and maturity lent themselves beautifully to the production’s drama. As I sobbed through La bohème’s fourth act, I knew I had contributed to something special.

Working at a prestigious summer festival allowed me to gain insight into how an art organization runs smoothly and efficiently. The Aspen staff and faculty responded to the inevitable challenges and changes of a summer season with grace and calmness, which allowed for seamless performances and exceptional student experiences.

Eventually, I would like to start a non-profit organization that connects people with special needs to opera. In Aspen, I developed opera operations acumen and learned how to better communicate with artists and teachers, both of which will prove to be invaluable in my future as an arts leader. I left Aspen more graceful, more focused, and ready for my second year at CCM.

Rachel Stanton | CCM 2nd-year Graduate Student in Arts Administration
Internship:
Administration & Operations Intern at Wolf Trap Opera

IMG_3272-min

Rachel Stanton. Photo courtesy of Steve Shin.

This summer, I learned why Wolf Trap Opera has a reputation as one of the leading young artist programs the world and personally contributed to the culture that makes it so special. Becoming a part of the Wolf Trap team over the summer meant I was responsible for a variety of tasks including the creation of supertitles, setting up for pre-show talks, and managing a recital at The Phillips Collection in DC.

The organizational culture at Wolf Trap Opera is centered on the concept of creating an environment where singers and artists can feel as comfortable as possible. Because of this, musicians are able to put their best work forward, audiences leave performances completely fulfilled and the administrative staff can leave the offices as if we had performed ourselves. One of the most memorable experiences of the summer was during the intermission of La bohème. When I emerged from the supertitles booth and began to make my way backstage, I passed through the audience of 6,000 and was able to catch snippets of praise about every aspect of the performance.

The internship program within the Wolf Trap Foundation led me to confirm many of the concepts that I’ve learned in the Arts Administration Program at CCM. With weekly seminars showcasing various department heads, I was able to observe how each department functions.

Not only did this help me to get a better sense of nonprofit organizations as a whole, but it also helped me to determine where I would like to see myself in the near future. Now that I’ve begun my second year at CCM, I feel more prepared than ever to take the next step of my career into Operations at an opera company.

La bohéme production photo courtesy of Scott Suchman and Wolf Trap Opera.

CCM News Student Salutes
Rehearsals for CCM's April 2016 production of SWAN LAKE.

E-Media Alumnus Wins Regional Emmy for Collaborative Student Video Series

Behind-the-scenes of CCM's production of 'Swan Lake.' Photos by UC News Writing and Production Class.

Behind-the-scenes of CCM’s production of “Swan Lake.” Photos by UC News Writing and Production Class.

After months of work and hours of filming, University of Cincinnati students produced a video series that recently won an Emmy at the Ohio Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Mark D’Andrea (BFA E-Media, 2016) won the Emmy as director and videographer of Building a Ballet. He worked on the project as a student with classmates enrolled in the Advanced News Writing and Production course, part of UC’s Digital Media Collaborative (DMC) between CCM, the College of Design Architecture, Art and Planning, the McMicken College of Arts & Sciences and UC Libraries.

Taught by Assistant Professor of E-Media Hagit Limor and Journalism Professor Bob Jonason, the class was created under the DMC umbrella in 2015 to build a bridge between colleges, giving students a hands-on learning experience that goes beyond the classroom. It blends technical and production skills  with creative expertise and storytelling.

“They learn to collaborate, they learn from each other, and they learn what it takes to produce professional-quality work,” Jonason said. “We think the class emulates real life. No matter where students land a job, they likely will be working in teams and with colleagues with various skills and from various backgrounds. And they will be held to high standards. This class helps prepare them for that work environment.”

Once completed, student projects are pitched to local media outlets for publication. The “Building a Ballet” videos were featured in Cincinnati Magazine. Previous class projects have been published by WCPO, FOX19 and the Cincinnati Enquirer, according to Limor. Students carry the project from idea to reality setting up interviews, shooting the film and editing it down to the final product. “They are in charge,” she said.

At the beginning of spring semester, students pitched the idea to create a video series focused on CCM’s production of Swan Lake.

Students spent months filming 'Swan Lake' rehearsals and interviewing cast members.

A clip from the “Building a Ballet” videos. Students spent months filming “Swan Lake” rehearsals and interviewing cast members.

How do you build a ballet? What do rehearsals look like?

They answered those questions in four videos composed of cast interviews and raw rehearsal footage.

Visit the class website students created to watch all four videos.

The series was created by students Brevin Couch, Tyler Dunn, Daniel Honerkamp, Ailish Masterston and Andrew Wilkins under D’Andrea’s “amazing eye,” Limor said.

D’Andrea shot and edited hours of footage featuring interviews with Swan Lake cast members Madison Holschuh, Sam Jones, Kianhna Saneshige and Dance Department chair and Swan Lake co-director Jiang Qi. The student director said his biggest challenge was capturing the emotion of the dancers on film.

“Watching the dancers perform was incredibly powerful, and at first, I didn’t feel like I was doing it justice,” D’Andrea said. “So I asked my teachers, and I kept experimenting and trying new things, really watching the dance and seeing where I needed to be to get it right.”

A recent graduate, D’Andrea is currently working as an assignment editor at FOX19 and has applied to several video production jobs. His dream is to one day make music videos or special skits for Saturday Night Live.

The Advanced News Writing and Production class is designed to give students professional work experience so they can build their resumes before they graduate, Limor said. Each project serves to strengthen their skill sets with hands-on experience.

“When you get out of school, potential employers want you to be as well-rounded as possible,” Limor said. “This is an innovative class that is exactly what the future needs to be for this line of work. Experiential learning is everything when training people for a job.”

CCM News Student Salutes
Bearcats at the Ballpark

CCM students and alumni to sing National Anthem at Reds Game

CCM students and alumni will sing The Star-Spangled Banner at the Great American Ball Park Friday night before the Cincinnati Reds play against the Seattle Mariners. The baseball diamond will serve as the singers’ stage as they perform during UC’s annual Bearcats at the Ballpark outing.

Students Nicole Hodgins, Sam Krausz, Grace Newberry, Pedro Arroyo and Chris Albanese will join alumni Danielle Adams (MM Voice 2014), Sarah Folsom (MM Voice 2015) and Stephen Hanna (MM Voice 2016) in singing the National Anthem at the game.

Bearcats at the BallparkThe event features a pre-game celebration at 5:45 p.m. with free giveaways at the Kroger Fan Zone, where UC President Santa Ono will perform the cello before the game. President Ono will also throw the first pitch at 7:10 p.m. Each year, discounted game tickets are offered to UC students, alumni, faculty and staff for Bearcats at the Ballpark:

Field Box: $28 (regularly $36)
Outer Mezzanine: $18 (regularly $20)
View Level: $11 (regularly $15)

To purchase tickets, visit reds.com/bearcats or call (513) 765-7055. Make sure to select CCM as your college in the drop-down menu!

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Heyuan Theatre

CCM Prep’s Starling Chamber Orchestra to tour China

The University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music Preparatory and Community Engagement is proud to announce that the remarkable talents of the Starling Chamber Orchestra are embarking on a tour in southern China this summer. Between June 13 and June 24, 2016, these young artists will perform a total of six concerts in professional venues.

Starling Chamber Orchestra

Starling Chamber Orchestra. Photo by Gary Kessler.

The program features a refreshing variety of composers, classical periods and regional styles. Among the selections are Mozart’s Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, Piazzolla’s Four Seasons of Buenos Aires, Bartok’s Romanian Folkdances and Spring of Xinjiang, a Chinese traditional piece, to name a few.While on tour the Starling Chamber Orchestra will perform in six professional venues: the Hunan Radio and Television Center studio, Shantou Arts Grand Theatre, Shenzhen Poly Theater, Huizhou Poly Culture and Arts Center and Heyuan Theatre.

While on tour the Starling Chamber Orchestra will perform in six professional venues: the Hunan Radio and Television Center studio, Shantou Arts Grand Theatre, Shenzhen Poly Theater, Huizhou Poly Culture and Arts Center and Heyuan Theatre.

The Starling Chamber Orchestra (SCO) is a 25-member string ensemble of young artists from the Cincinnati Starling Project. CCM Violin Professor and Dorothy Richard Starling Chair in Classical Violin, Kurt Sassmannshaus, founded the Starling Project in 1989. It offers unprecedented opportunities for young artists to perform as soloists, tour internationally, and make recordings. These young virtuosi have attracted widespread attention, including feature articles in the Washington Post and the New York Times. Branded as “The World’s Youngest Chamber Orchestra” by the Münchner Merkur, the orchestra has been featured on From the Top, Performance Today and on Robert Sherman’s Young Artists Showcase program in New York. The SCO maintains a busy touring and recording schedule. Since 1992, the orchestra has performed frequently at the Aspen Music Festival and has toured Europe, Korea, Russia, and the People’s Republic of China and at Lincoln and Kennedy Centers. The orchestra also performs an annual series of concerts at CCM.

The members of the Starling Chamber Orchestra also participate in the Cincinnati Starling Project, a specialized educational program for talented young string players. Its mission is to pass on the rich tradition of classical music to the next generation of performers and audiences by training exceptional students. In addition to private lessons, students participate in a comprehensive program that includes chamber music and music theory.

Starling Project students and alumni have won awards such as the International Tchaikovsky Competition, The China International Violin Competition, and the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition.

The Cincinnati Starling Project and Starling Chamber Orchestra are generously funded through a grant from the Dorothy Richard Starling Foundation, as well as a number of generous donors. The program is also supported by the Starling Project Foundation, Inc. and the Preparatory Department of CCM.

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Story by CCM graduate student Charlotte Kies

CCM News Student Salutes
CCM Graduation Convocation and luncheon 2016. Photos by Lisa Britton.

CCM Slideshows: Graduation Convocation 2016

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CCM celebrated the Class of 2016 with a luncheon and Graduation Convocation Ceremony on April 30. The ceremony featured students receiving baccalaureate, masters, doctoral, and artist diploma degrees and recognized this year’s distinguished alumni and service award recipients.

Dean Peter Landgren began the ceremony with a welcome address and recognition awards. Steve Shin (MM Trombone 2013, MA/MBA Arts Administration 2016) received the Distinguished Young Alumnus Award. The Distinguished Alumnus Award went to David Daniels (BM Voice, 1990) and Trish Bryan was recognized with the Distinguished Service Award.

Congratulations to all of the 2016 graduates of the UC College-Conservatory of Music! We can’t wait to see what you accomplish in the years ahead.

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