CCM Flute Students and Alumni Achieve Clean Sweep at North Carolina Flute Competition

We are thrilled to report that current and former CCM students took all three top prizes at the inaugural Artist Competition held by the Raleigh Area Flute Association (RAFA)! The competition took place on Nov. 14, 2015, during the organization’s annual Flute Fair in Raleigh, North Carolina.

All three winners are current or former students of famed performer and CCM faculty member Randolph Bowman:

  • First Place: Matthew Ross. Ross is a current master of music student at CCM. For winning the competition, he received a $1,000 cash prize and will be invited to perform a full recital during RAFA’s 2016–17 season.
  • Second Place: Lindsay Leach-Sparks. Sparks, who currently resides in Chapel Hill, N.C., is a 2012 graduate of CCM, earning her Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) degree. She was awarded a $500 prize for finishing second.
  • Third Place: Jennifer Gosack. Gosack is currently pursuing her DMA at CCM; she also previously earned a 2011 Artist Diploma (AD) and 2010 MM from the college. For her third-place finish, she won a $250 cash prize.
From left to right, RAFA President Rosene Rohrer, Jennifer M. Gosack (3rd place winner), Matthew Ross (1st place winner), Lindsay Leach-Sparks (2nd place winner), and Artistic Competition Coordinator Catherine LeGrand. Photo by Darryl Kessler/Riverview Photography.

From left to right, RAFA President Rosene Rohrer, Jennifer M. Gosack (3rd place winner), Matthew Ross (1st place winner), Lindsay Leach-Sparks (2nd place winner), and Artistic Competition Coordinator Catherine LeGrand. Photo by Darryl Kessler/Riverview Photography.

About the RAFA
RAFA, formerly the Raleigh Area Flute Association, is a nonprofit corporation founded in 1985. In addition to our extensive family of teachers and students, we have several flute choirs that perform throughout the Raleigh and Greater Triangle Areas. Our parent organization, the Raleigh Flute Choir, is home to some of the best flutists in Raleigh and beyond, but RAFA with its membership roster of over 300 flutists encourages everyone to strive for their best flute playing.

RAFA presents workshops, masterclasses, and competitions all year, but our favorite event is our annual Flute Fair, held in mid-fall, where all our members gather together for presentations, guest artists, recitals, and flute-related vendors all in one! We support activities through membership dues and contributions from both individuals and businesses throughout the area as well as nationwide.

The mission of the Raleigh Area Flute Association is to:

  • promote flute playing in the Raleigh area,
  • promote the enjoyment and appreciation of the flute,
  • assist members in achieving musical excellence, and
  • provide scholarships for worthy students.

Join us in congratulating these current and former students on their achievements!

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Photography by Mark Lyons.

CCM Named ‘Best Musical Theatre College For Broadway Success’

The educational news site Learn U has placed CCM at the very top of its list for Best Musical Theatre Colleges for Broadway Success. The report states:

“In terms of bang for your buck, CCM’s program comes out the winner – it’s the school we gave the #1 ranking to in our list of the best MT programs, and it’s also one of the more affordable options.”

Long lauded as the “gold standard” of BFA musical theatre programs, CCM Musical Theatre is the oldest program of its kind in the country. Establish in 1968 by Helen Laird, with Jack Rouse serving as its first chairman, the program served as the model for the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) and the National Association of Schools of Theatre (NAST) in creating their guidelines for the accreditation of musical theatre programs in the United States.

Photography by Mark Lyons.

CCM’s Mainstage Series production of ‘Carousel.’ Photography by Mark Lyons.

The Learn U report observes, “The thing that really makes CCM stand out is the tremendous success that alumni have had on Broadway. The list of alumni who have gone on to have careers in the entertainment industry is extensive and reads like a who’s who of Broadway stars.” You can learn more about the impressive successes of our alumni by visiting ccm.uc.edu/theatre/musical_theatre/alumni.

You can read Learn U’s full report of top musical theatre programs here.

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'The Merry Widow' photography by Mark Lyons.

Discussing ‘The Merry Widow’ Costumes with Student Designer Greta Stokes

The Merry Widow Costume Designer Greta Stokes recently sat down with CCM Public Information Assistant and DMA student Charlotte Kies to discuss the work that went into this delightful new production of Franz Lehár’s most popular operetta.

Charlotte Kies: Hi Greta! What can you tell me about your inspiration for these costumes?

Juliana Rucker draped and built this charming blue dress for Valencienne. Photography by Steve Shin.

Juliana Rucker draped and built this charming blue dress for Valencienne. Photo by Steve Shin.

Greta Stokes: Although the opera was written right around the turn of the 20th century, we knew we wanted to create a more modern silhouette for the women’s garments, like the same kind of idea behind Dior’s new look of the 1950s.

But when we began working with the text and thinking about how the actors are interacting we kind of let go of the design being so strict. It became more 50s, 60s, 90s, now. It became looser and less of a period piece, because it’s not a stiff opera. It doesn’t need to be historical.

When I first got assigned this show I watched an old production of it, I looked at old stills and I got a feel for what the opera used to be. At this point we had already decided on the 50’s. If you look at my Pinterest board it starts with these beautiful black and white photos. And then you can see how after every conversation I had with [Merry Widow director] Professor Emma Griffin the board gets crazier and crazier, and brighter, and begins to include things that aren’t from the 50’s at all, like these modern fashion collections and this weird art. It started out very demure, with lots of little black dresses. And then it just got wild, and the cast is really into it. It has been a great kind of build up to that and I think that the result is really interesting and different and fun.

Greta Stokes' design concept for Hanna's dress.

Greta Stokes’ design concept for Hanna’s dress.

CK: So the costumes are not specific to one decade?

GS: They’re mid-century flavored. There are a lot of brighter colors, and we took a lot of inspiration from more modern fashion houses. There’s a lot of Prada and Dolce & Gabbana resort lines right now that are very colorful. Our costumes are those two ideas [vintage and modern] married together.

When people come in for a fitting for a period piece and they’re putting high-fitted pleated pants on you, they look great if you’re doing a strictly 50’s show. Even though they look great on stage, you can tell the actors are uncomfortable in them. So to have a modern cut with a vintage feel, I know my performers will go on stage feeling comfortable and good about how they look, and you can really see that in their movements.

CK: Can you tell me about your design process?

GS: We started looking at research in the middle of last semester before it was cast. All of the designers got together to discuss concepts, colors schemes and how we would interact with each other. We built research collages and talked about what inspired us. From there I decided what pieces needed to be built for the performers. Our lead character’s costume is getting built from scratch. We discussed how the characters are in this made-up country at an embassy in Paris and what that might look like. We got to decide what and where that country was. We decided on something eastern European, but I incorporated little bits of different European cultures into a made-up folk costume so you’ll see elements of that. There are two characters that are wearing kilts and one in lederhosen. There are little flavors of recognizable folk traditions scattered among the Petrovenians. It’s off the wall but still a little controlled. When I’m in the costume shop and all around me are flower crowns and lederhosen and kilts and a bunch of tuxedoes, I feel I should be telling people “I swear I’m not crazy, I promise this will make sense!” Fingers crossed!

Maria Lenn built and draped this dashing red and black dress for Jessica Faselt (playing Hanna Glawari on Friday and Sunday) from Greta Stokes’ designs. Lenn is fitting Faselt while Stokes and her assistant, Sarah Red Redden look on as Stokes’ designs come to life. Photography by Steve Shin.

Maria Lenn built and draped this dashing red and black dress for Jessica Faselt (playing Hanna Glawari on Friday and Sunday) from Greta Stokes’ designs. Lenn is fitting Faselt while Stokes and her assistant, Sarah Red Redden look on as Stokes’ designs come to life. Photo by Steve Shin.

CK: Does Hanna have a costume change in the middle of the show?

GS: She kind of does, she has this outer shell made with beautiful pink dupioni. The shell comes off later in the opera as the acts and the parties go on. And there are so many crystals on that black skirt, it’s gonna be on fire.

CK: How are these costumes different from costumes you might see in another version?

GS: In the original versions there are HUGE choruses and they’re all wearing these crazy costumes that are all very expensive and lavish. Older productions were all about the costumes, and the performers just kind of walk around the stage going “lalala, look at my giant hat, lalalalala.”

Ours is a condensed, smaller cast. It’s still a lot of people, but because we have created more modern clothing, it has become really more about their movement. The idea is that they’re drinking, moving from one party to the next. They’re having a really good time.

CK: How much liberty do you have? Do you get to design whatever you want? Do you have any restrictions or guidelines?

In Act II, the party guests reconvene at Hanna Glawari’s house for a garden party. Brian Horton built these hats for the characters, who decide that Hanna’s garden is better suited for their outfits. Photography by Steve Shin.

In Act II, the party guests reconvene at Hanna Glawari’s house for a garden party. Brian Horton built these hats for the characters, who decide that Hanna’s garden is better suited for their outfits. Photo by Steve Shin.

GS: We operate under the guidance of Professor Dean Mogle, head of the Costume Design and Technology program at CCM. I would say we are restricted by what we are able to get. Obviously there are time restrictions, as well. I couldn’t ask them to build every single tuxedo, so we purchased tuxedos. I designed Hanna’s costume to look like a mix between Marilyn Monroe and Anna Nicole Smith.

As for the dancers, I actually found these vintage dresses that we had in stock that were specifically dance dresses. Because we are not doing a traditional can-can we can use these really full, floofy skirts with all these sparkles and stuff. In Act II they’re all at Hanna’s house for a garden party and the women take these flowers off of the set and put them on their hats. They are completely ruining her garden, and she totally does not care.

Professor Griffin is incredible to work with. She is so great at letting designers have liberties, while still reining us in or pushing us forward. It is really nice to have all those liberties, to be able to create this world out of nothing and figure out what exists in it.

CK: Is it the same dress design for the two Hanna’s?

GS: Yes, but they are built to fit each performer. The design will be the same, but the fit will be different just because the bodies are.

CK: How much work are you doing outside of CCM while you’re also a student?

GS: Oh, not a lot, because I’m a little busy! I am working on The Little Prince right now for Cincinnati Chamber Opera as the costume designer/coordinator.

I also work for New Edgecliff Theatre. We just closed Frankie & Johnny in the Clare de Lune and we’ll be back in the spring with The Shape of Things.

CK: Have you enjoyed your time as a student at CCM?

GS: Of course yes! I am from Columbus, so I’m not too far from my family. This school is incredible. I love how hands-on it is and how we’re really working as a professional theatre would. We are learning to interact with each other and not just in our own little worlds.

CK: How did you get into costume design?

GS: I am a non-traditional student, so I ‘m quite a bit older. I did theatre in high school. I worked in the costume shop. I did a little acting, but I wasn’t very good! I stitched. I was friends with all of the theatre kids and I really liked it. My grandmother was a dress designer so I would always go play with her dressmaking tools and pocket a few of them. I continued to work in vintage stores for a long time doing alterations for vintage clothing.

I have always been working with clothing, and this made more sense than fashion. I have always really loved the theatre community and I feel like it has a really good turnover. It’s not like “oh, polka-dots are so in right now.” It’s a constant challenge.

Maria Lenn built and draped this dashing red and black dress for Jessica Faselt (playing Hanna Glawari on Friday and Sunday) from Greta Stokes’ designs. Lenn is fitting Faselt while Stokes and her assistant, Sarah Red Redden look on as Stokes’ designs come to life. Photo by Steve Shin.

Maria Lenn built and draped this dashing red and black dress for Jessica Faselt (playing Hanna Glawari on Friday and Sunday) from Greta Stokes’ designs. Lenn is fitting Faselt while Stokes and her assistant, Sarah Red Redden look on as Stokes’ designs come to life. Photo by Steve Shin.


Franz Lehár’s The Merry Widow runs Nov. 19 – 22 in Patricia Corbett Theater. Tickets are $31-35 for adults, $20-24 for non-UC students and $18-22 UC students with a valid ID. $12-$15 student rush tickets will become available one hour prior to each performance; limit two student rush tickets per valid ID.

Tickets can be purchased in person at the CCM Box Office, over the telephone at 513-556-4183 or online at ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/mainstage/merry-widow.

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Mainstage Season Production Sponsor: Macy’s

Community Partner: ArtsWave

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Introducing the ONECCM Student Giving Campaign

We are very proud to announce the kick-off of a new fundraising campaign organized entirely by CCM’s student population. Through the ONECCM Student Giving Campaign, our students are coming together to invest in the future of the arts and the Cincinnati community!

ONECCM Student Giving campaign logo.

Click here to learn more.

The funds raised by this new campaign will support CCM After School, in collaboration with Whiz Kids. This remarkable partnership provides students at low-income elementary schools with the opportunity to actively participate in the arts. The program allows CCM student leaders to travel directly to these schools, and give disadvantaged students the opportunity to experience instruments, singing, movement, art and spoken word.

You can learn more about this student-led initiative by visiting ccm.uc.edu/support/studentgivingTogether our ones can make a big impact.

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Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra header.

Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra Taps CCM Dean and Alumni for New Leadership Positions

The Board of Trustees of the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra has announced several changes in leadership, as well as the creation of two important artistic positions.

CCM Dean Peter Landgren will be joining the staff in the role of Director of Artistic Planning. He will be responsible for guiding the CCO’s artistic vision and direction of Summermusik 2016. He will work closely with the Artistic Advisor, and staff, board and musicians of the CCO to ensure a successful season.

CCM Dean Peter Landgren.

CCM Dean Peter Landgren.

“I am thrilled that the CCO recognizes CCM’s desire to build collaborative and mutually beneficial relationships between Cincinnati’s arts organizations,” said Landgren. “I had the privilege of performing with the CCO under the leadership of their first music director, Paul Nadler, during my time as a student at CCM. I am honored that the CCO’s leadership feels that my background and perspective will lend a helping hand to this important year as they prepare for the final stages of a search for a new music director.”

Landgren began his tenure as Dean of CCM in September of 2011. During his initial appointment, he secured the internationally acclaimed Ariel Quartet as CCM’s string quartet-in-residence, initiated a number of collaborations with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (including the collaboration with the Cincinnati World Piano Competition and the CSO/CCM Diversity Fellowship program), partnered with faculty search committees to hire over 20 new full-time tenure-track faculty members, participated in the UC Provost’s Cluster-Hire initiative through the Digital Media Collaborative, enhanced the college’s community engagement efforts through key staff hires and grant support, and much more. He also refocused CCM’s vision and mission for the 21st century through the “ONECCM” initiative. In June of 2015, the UC Board of Trustees unanimously approved Landgren’s reappointment to a new seven-year term, extending his tenure at CCM through June 30, 2023.

Prior to his appointment at CCM, Landgren served as Conservatory Director at Baldwin-Wallace College from 2007 – 2011 after having spent the previous twenty-nine years as a musician with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and twenty-six years as a faculty member of the Peabody Conservatory of The Johns Hopkins University. From 2005-2006, Landgren served the Peabody Institute as the Interim Director. He also led Peabody in an institute-wide Change Initiative from 2003-2005 that was responsible for examining the institute in a quest to increase Peabody’s preeminence amongst its peers. In the spring of 2003, Landgren received the Excellence in Teaching award from The Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association. This was the second time Landgren had been awarded this honor as a Peabody faculty member.

Landgren became a member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra when he was 21 years old, before completing his undergraduate training at CCM. Three years later he made his professional solo debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Joseph Silverstein. Landgren has performed with Summit Brass, the Melos Ensemble and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. He has also performed as Principal Horn with the Cincinnati, Houston and Columbus Symphony Orchestras. An alumnus of CCM, Landgren won the college’s concerto competition three times and regularly performed with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Cincinnati Opera and Cincinnati Ballet during his time as a student.

CCM alumnus Isaac Selya has been named as Artistic Advisor for Summermusik 2016. He will work with the Director of Artistic Planning and the CCO staff and musicians to ensure the artistic quality of the highly successful Chamber Crawl festival performances. Isaac will also serve as Associate Conductor, working with the four finalist music director candidates who will be conducting the four Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra concerts at SCPA during Summermusik 2016.

A musician of remarkable versatility, Isaac is a conductor, pianist, vocal coach, cellist and singer. He is the founder and Artistic Director of Queen City Chamber Opera, where he has coached and conducted Walküre Act I and Siegfried Acts I and II from Wagner’s Ring Cycle, Die Entführung aus dem Serail, Der Schauspieldirektor, Bastien und Bastienne, Zaide, Abu Hassan, and L’amore dei tre re. As of March 2015, he has conducted all of Mozart’s German-language operas. He joined Cincinnati Opera in 2014 as a coach/accompanist, and in September of 2014 he was the featured new artist of the month in Musical America. In the summer of 2015, he joined the Glimmerglass Festival as Assistant Conductor.

Equally at home in the symphonic repertoire, Isaac debuted with the National Symphony of Guatemala in September 2014 with two programs focusing on Beethoven Symphonies 5 and 6.

He holds a BA from Yale College, where he studied conducting with Toshiyuki Shimada. He holds a doctorate from CCM.

CCM alumna LeAnne Anklan has been named General Manager of the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra. LeAnne joined the staff of the CCO in 2012 in the position of artistic and orchestra operations manager. She was promoted to acting general manager in July, 2014.

Her professional background includes experience as senior marketing coordinator for FRCH Design Worldwide, public relations manager for the Contemporary Arts Center, and marketing associate for the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. In 2011, she held the position of festival manager for the successful inaugural season of the Constella Festival of Music and Fine Arts. LeAnne serves as vice president of the board of the not-for-profit Cincinnati Contemporary Jazz Orchestra, which she helped to found. She is also a Board member of Cincy Emerging Arts Leaders.

A Cincinnati native, LeAnne holds three degrees from the University of Cincinnati: Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing and International Business, Master of Business Administration, and Master of Arts in Arts Administration. A lifelong musician, she also serves as vice president of the UC Band Alumni Association and plays flute and piccolo regularly with the Alumni and Community Bands at UC.

Wes Needham has been elected by the CCO board to succeed Jennifer Funk as board president and assumes his new role November 15, 2015. Wes has been a board member since 2012, and has served this past year as first vice-president, secretary and chair of the music director search committee. He is the Lead Engineer for Distribution Design with Duke Energy and a resident of Northern Kentucky.

“I am honored and humbled to assume the role of board president with the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra,” said Needham. “Since becoming a part of the CCO board in 2012, I have come to care passionately about the success of this remarkable organization and about chamber music in Cincinnati. This is a time of exciting change for the CCO and I look forward helping the CCO continue its longstanding tradition of musical excellence.”

About the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra
The Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra is an independent ensemble of 32 professional musicians that celebrated its 40th anniversary season in 2014 and launched the critically acclaimed summer music festival Summermusik in August, 2015. The CCO offers a vibrant and fresh musical experience in an intimate and informal setting, for both the seasoned and novice concert patron. The CCO’s size allows for flexibility and creativity in programming, the ideal ensemble for presenting orchestral works ranging from the Baroque and Classical eras to commissioned works by contemporary composers. Collaborations have become a hallmark of the CCO, including ongoing partnerships with VAE: Cincinnati’s Vocal Arts Ensemble and Madcap Puppets.

For additional information on the CCO, visit www.ccocincinnati.org.

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Kenyatta University Cultural Exchange.

Experience the Cultural Exchange: CCM Drama Welcomes Guests from Kenyatta University

On Saturday, Oct. 31, six students and one faculty member from Kenyatta University will make the journey to Cincinnati to take part in CCM’s second-annual 48-Hour Film Festival.

Jean Akinyi, David Babu, Eric Mwangi, Kelvinson Muriithi Mwangi, Christine Njeri, Austin Opata and Professor Zippy Okoth will spend the following week in Cincinnati, attending classes at UC and experiencing the culture of the area, before participating in the film festival from Nov. 6-8.

You can keep up with their experiences by visiting CCM Drama Chair Richard Hess‘ blog at richardinkenya.wordpress.com.

In 2011, Hess brought eight current and former CCM Drama students to Kenya to take part in the Dadaab Theatre Project on World Refugee Day. He returned to Kenya in 2014 as a Fulbright Scholar and spent a semester teaching and conducting research at Kenyatta University’s Department of Theatre Arts and Film Technology.

For the second installment of CCM’s 48-Hour Film Festival, Hess wanted to expose students to these same kinds of life-changing creative experiences. “The integration of our cultures and artistic viewpoints will challenge prejudices and assumptions, enlarging the world-views and possibilities of each participant,” says Hess. “Adding a Kenyan artist to each creative team is a meaningful way to affect every student in the CCM Film Festival.”

The general public is invited to the festival’s screening party at 7 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 8. Films will be screened in UC’s MainStreet Cinema in the Tangeman University Center.

Dates and Times

  • Festival: 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, through 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 8
  • Public Screening: 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 8

Screening Location
MainStreet Cinema, Tangeman University Center
University of Cincinnati

Admissions to Screening
The 48-Hour Film Festival’s screening party is free and open to the general public. Reservations are not required.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the new U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

CCM Season Presenting Sponsor and Musical Theatre Program Sponsor: The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation

Community Partner: ArtsWave

The Kenyatta University 2015 Exchange Program has been made possible by the A.B., Dolly, Ralph and Julia Cohen Family Foundation, and Neil R. Artman and Margaret L. Straub.

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The logo for CET's "arts Bridge" television program.

CET Spotlights Revolutionary New iPad App Developed by CCM and DAAP Faculty Members

Two University of Cincinnati faculty members will appear on local PBS member station CET at 6 p.m. this Saturday, July 18, to discuss a revolutionary new project that could change the world of psychiatry.

The CET program arts Bridge will feature CCM Assistant Professor of Electronic Media John Hebbeler and DAAP Assistant Professor of Design Emily Verba. The duo are developing an iPad application entitled Brain to Screen, which is a visual and auditory interactive tool for patients diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder as well as their psychotherapists.

The proposed app converges cross-disciplinary expertise in design, sound, psychology, neuroscience and software development in order to deliver immersive, interactive experiences. The Brain to Screen app works in conjunction with a biofeedback headset and allows patients complete control of all visuals and sounds on their iPad screen using only their brainwaves.

The two UC professors and co-investigators bring a great deal of professional experience and expertise to this ambitious project. Professor Hebbeler has over a decade of experience in sound, video and web production, and 10 years of teaching experience in a variety of production-based courses. His area of expertise is creating interactive trans-media compositions that integrate a wide range of technological devices. His focus in this project is the sound development of Brain to Screen, as well as its interaction with the biofeedback headset.

Meanwhile, Professor Verba brings several years of experience in the field of graphic design and design education to this empirical research project. Her area of expertise and research focus is data visualization — the simplified depiction of complex content for ease of understanding by the masses. She is spearheading the visualization of biofeedback headset data and the design of an interface for psychotherapists to access and interpret the information collected from the app.

The arts Bridge segment will also bring Hebbeler together with several current and former students from CCM’s Division of Electronic Media and UC Blue Ash’s Department of Electronic Media Communications. Alumnus Don Hancock (BFA Electronic Media, 2006) is producing the story, and Deshon Able (AAS Electronic Media Technology, 2013) acts as the production assistant; furthermore, current E-Media student Ari Kruger is also working at CET as an intern, writer and editor.

arts Bridge is a locally-produced program that is part of a unique public television collaboration. Features about Cincinnati area arts and artists are paired with stories from across the country. In addition, Cincinnati area segments from arts Bridge are made available to public television stations nationally, extending the reach of greater Cincinnati arts well beyond southwest Ohio.

For more information, please make sure to visit www.cetconnect.org/arts-bridge.

The Brain to Screen segment will premiere at 6 p.m. on Saturday, July 18, on CET (Channel 13 or 1013 on Time Warner Cable; Channel 48 on DirectTV). There will also be several repeat airings:

  • 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sunday, July 19 (Channel 16 Time Warner and Direct TV)
  • 8 a.m., 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Monday, July 20 (Channel 987 Time Warner)
  • 10 a.m., 3 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tuesday July 21 (Channel 987 Time Warner)

Learn more about CCM E-Media by visiting ccm.uc.edu/emedia.

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